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A records vs. Nameservers

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  #1  
Old 08-24-2010, 02:21 AM
woojin0391 woojin0391 is offline
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A records vs. Nameservers


Is there a difference on using A records or Nameservers in pointing a domain to a server?

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  #2  
Old 08-24-2010, 05:44 AM
ghost3 ghost3 is offline
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They do two different things:

An A record will point to an IP.

A nameserver entry will point to some nameservers (where you will still have to setup an A record to point the domain to an IP).

Many registrars let you set up Host records right on their nameservers. If you don't care which nameservers you use, then setting up an A record right on the registrar's nameservers should work just fine for you.

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  #3  
Old 08-24-2010, 05:52 AM
ibee ibee is offline
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A record means pointing it to an IP address

Nameserver means a record something like ns1.dnsgem.com which in turn will have A record to point to an IP address

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  #4  
Old 08-24-2010, 08:14 AM
woojin0391 woojin0391 is offline
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but how about speed or any other factors that affects it?

  #5  
Old 08-24-2010, 08:45 AM
lynxus lynxus is offline
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What do you mean by "speed"

Evidently the speed of the nameserver will change the "speed" that a site gets resolved and then loads?

A name server is the DNS server that holds the A records, MX records etc..

So when you browse to lets say, Google.com

Your browser searches for the Nameserver on google.
It then queries the nameserver for the A record of the domain google.com
Your browser then connects to the IP in the A record.

Nameserver = yellow pages.
A record = a telephone number for a business inside the yellow pages..

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  #6  
Old 08-24-2010, 08:56 AM
woojin0391 woojin0391 is offline
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i mean, will it affect how fast the domain will redirect/point (i'm not sure of what term to use) to the proper server?

  #7  
Old 08-24-2010, 08:58 AM
lynxus lynxus is offline
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Yeah, If the nameserver is slow to respond then yes, it will take longer for the browser to get the correct IP and load the page.

Normally this isnt a problem and DNS records / DNS servers answer fairly quickly.

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  #8  
Old 08-24-2010, 09:07 AM
woojin0391 woojin0391 is offline
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so do you think using A records is better than Nameservers?

  #9  
Old 08-24-2010, 09:12 AM
lynxus lynxus is offline
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I think your probably a little confused.

You will require both for your domain to work.

Nameservers HOLD the A records.

So your domain zone file will have lets say 2 NS ( nameserve records )
You then have A records MX etc .
The nameservers hold the A records..

So your NS records will point to the DNS server that holds the A record.
The A record will point to your server IP address.

I hope this helps?

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  #10  
Old 08-24-2010, 12:33 PM
Host4Geeks Host4Geeks is offline
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A name server is like a Table and A records are like data in the table.

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  #11  
Old 08-25-2010, 09:24 AM
shawn_99 shawn_99 is offline
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An A record is part of the zone file. It is used to divert the traffic to an IP address.

For example, if you want marketing.yourdomain.com to go to IP address 222.111.444.4, you can set an A record for marketing.yourdomain.com to point to 222.111.444.4.

A records are mostly used for setting up Mail Exchangers.

Hope this helps!

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