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  #1  
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Google DNS for Forward Lookups from server?


The colo facility I am considering doesn't operate DNS servers for forward lookups. I guess this is common..? Anyway they are suggesting that I use Google DNS for forward DNS lookups from my server.

Is that a good suggestion? Not sure what to think, but it seems harmless though. Thanks.



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  #2  
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Not too common, but not uncommon either. use 8.8.8.8, 8.8.4.4, 4.2.2.1, 4.2.2.2, opendns resolvers etc etc, i'm sure others will have more suggestions.

Google also have phone support
http://code.google.com/speed/public-dns/docs/using.html

  #3  
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It's easier to recommend it when you are nearby to a Google peering exchange, and you don't have the time or resources to keep resolver servers running. Or simply don't want to take the blame when the resolver goes down. Sometimes it's faster than using the uplink servers (i.e., in my case, the Google resolvers are local in Miami via peering, the carrier servers are one in NY and one in LAX). The IPs for Google and Level3 servers are easier to remember also...

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Quote:
Originally Posted by iptelligent View Post
It's easier to recommend it when you are nearby to a Google peering exchange, and you don't have the time or resources to keep resolver servers running. Or simply don't want to take the blame when the resolver goes down. Sometimes it's faster than using the uplink servers (i.e., in my case, the Google resolvers are local in Miami via peering, the carrier servers are one in NY and one in LAX). The IPs for Google and Level3 servers are easier to remember also...
Thanks. How do I check if the facility is close to a Google peering exchange?

  #5  
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ping 8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4 and see how many milliseconds it takes to reply.

  #6  
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About 25ms to the Google DNS...

The 4.2.2.1 and 4.2.2.2 ones ping at 17ms - who owns those?

Is this going to be too slow, or is that okay?

  #7  
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4.0.0.0/8 is owned by Level3.
They were old GTE public DNS servers.

The speed of light in fiber is 200 x 10^6 m/s (200k km/s). That means the latency of an optical signal traveling in a fiber-optic cable is 5 microsec per kilometer. Plus the overhead for signaling, encapsulation and hardware speeds on each end.

At those ranges, they are nowhere close to your location, but, if you don't have local public resolvers, the 4.2.2.12 resolvers would be better...

  #8  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iptelligent View Post
4.0.0.0/8 is owned by Level3.
They were old GTE public DNS servers.

The speed of light in fiber is 200 x 10^6 m/s (200k km/s). That means the latency of an optical signal traveling in a fiber-optic cable is 5 microsec per kilometer. Plus the overhead for signaling, encapsulation and hardware speeds on each end.

At those ranges, they are nowhere close to your location, but, if you don't have local public resolvers, the 4.2.2.12 resolvers would be better...
Ok thanks. Last question, kinda noobish, but what do these resolvers actually impact on the server? Obviously I'm not using my server for web browsing websites, so I would imagine this will impact some applications on the servers ability to resolve DNS queries. It's not a "huge" deal, am I right? Or way off?

  #9  
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If your server is a mail server, it wont be able to deliver emails. It wont be able to use its auto-update functions (being your package manager in *nix or Windows Update on windows). It wont be able to resolve reverse DNS queries for people who connect at it (if you set some kind of filter on the webserver based on the hostname of the machine that is connecting to you).

  #10  
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You could run your own DNS server and make sure it's only accessible to you since it's doing open recursion. I haven't had much trouble with 4.2.2.2 personally.

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  #11  
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Open DNS is a good one too...

208.67.222.222
208.67.220.220

  #12  
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Google's DNS servers are multicast, so they should always give you good latency. I've had no problem using them ever.

The guy above is right about reverse DNS though, all providers should provide this.

  #13  
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Google works great for me

  #14  
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ehm, you have your own server? Install DNS server software on it (like Bind) and use your localhost 127.0.0.1 as resolver!

  #15  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Atlas Global View Post
Open DNS is a good one too...
OpenDNS also has the benefit of allowing you to do an immediate cache update instead of having to wait for the TTL to expire.

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