Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    /dev/null
    Posts
    275

    Need advice: i7 too hot!

    Hi,

    I've just moved to my new house, and my computer room is smaller than what is was.

    I've got a i7 (cheapest one) at normal clock speed with original fan & heatsink. CPU Temperature is normal ~50C, but leaving the computer on for 3-4 hours warms the room enough to be uncomfortable.

    Any suggestions?
    I tried downclocking the CPU to 1.6 ghz, but it still warms the room.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    WebHostingTalk
    Posts
    16,960
    I am using it at my room and it is fine. I have an air con in my room though so probably didn't notice it.
    Specially 4 You
    .
    JoneSolutions.Com ( Jones.Solutions ) is on the net 24/7 providing stable and reliable web hosting solutions and services since 2001

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Toronto, Canada
    Posts
    2,570
    Perhaps try getting more air circulation by opening the windows/doors in your room or a better fan and heatsink for the CPU.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Las Vegas, NV
    Posts
    89
    I second the better fan/heatsink combination. If you are not willing to go that far, I'd at least pull the stock heatsink off, clean it well with alcohol, and re-seat it using Arctic Silver thermal paste. Great stuff.

    I am not sure how comfortable you would be with doing this, but the process known as 'lapping' will do you some good as well.

    'Lapping' is a process in which you use various grits of sandpaper to refine the surfaces of the heatsink and processor heat shield. The result is a mirror-smooth surface where optimum heat transfer is obtained.

    Hope this helps. Good luck!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Goleta, CA
    Posts
    5,550
    Just buy a nice fan to blow the hot air outside.
    Last edited by cywkevin; 07-31-2009 at 06:37 PM.
    Patron: I'd like my free lunch please.
    Cafe Manager: Free lunch? Did you read the fine print stating it was an April Fool's joke.
    Patron: I read the same way I listen, I ignore the parts I don't agree with. I'm suing you for false advertising.
    Cafe Owner: Is our lawyer still working pro bono?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    55
    Keep the door to your computer room open. Given the advances in thermal management, an i7 with no load will sometimes run close to ambient temp. Are you running something like seti @ home? Does your case have sufficient airflow?
    AS46176SavvisAbovenetnLayerMzimaOneringLevel3CogentTelia Fully Route Optimized
    DC#1 55 Marietta St. Atlanta GA | DC#2 34 Peachtree St. Atlanta GA | DC#3 PhoenixNAP Phoenix AZ
    Follow us on twitter @SoutheastWeb or visit our website

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    paradise
    Posts
    6,201
    Better fan /heatsink / lapping will not reduce heat in the room.

    Use a exhaust fan to remove the warm air out of the room.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Rocky Face, GA
    Posts
    196
    I'd look into getting a higher-grade/better heatsink. The ones shipped standard with CPU's today are really for normal/average CPU use. A decent heatsink will run between $30-$70 depending on what brand you purchase. It may seem a little expensive, but it's better than high-heat build-up, excessive heat inside the case and a burnt-out CPU.

    That said, I'd also look into a variable setting exhaust fan which will allow you to adjust the RPM's so that it's not a noise-nuisance.

    One thing to keep in mind is that even with a heatsink & exhaust fan, how you place the fans inside your case will really make a difference as to the heat displacement.

    I've never been a fan of loading up a case with fans in the first place. A stock custom build for me consists of a high-grade CPU Heatsink, an exhaust fan in the back of the case and 2 additional fans. One of these fans blows over the hard drives, one near the GPU. As these fans take in air, it moves over the hardware and out the exhaust fan.
    Michael T. @ Resellr.Net - CEO
    The Premier Reseller Hosting Solution
    Visit Us @ Resellr.Net | Follow Resellr.Net on Twitter

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Las Vegas, NV
    Posts
    89
    Quote Originally Posted by Michael-DAS View Post
    I'd look into getting a higher-grade/better heatsink. The ones shipped standard with CPU's today are really for normal/average CPU use. A decent heatsink will run between $30-$70 depending on what brand you purchase. It may seem a little expensive, but it's better than high-heat build-up, excessive heat inside the case and a burnt-out CPU.

    That said, I'd also look into a variable setting exhaust fan which will allow you to adjust the RPM's so that it's not a noise-nuisance.

    One thing to keep in mind is that even with a heatsink & exhaust fan, how you place the fans inside your case will really make a difference as to the heat displacement.

    I've never been a fan of loading up a case with fans in the first place. A stock custom build for me consists of a high-grade CPU Heatsink, an exhaust fan in the back of the case and 2 additional fans. One of these fans blows over the hard drives, one near the GPU. As these fans take in air, it moves over the hardware and out the exhaust fan.
    Well said Michael. Fan placement and orientation are very important when trying to get the best heat dissipation from an air-cooled setup. There should be some diagrams floating around the net regarding this.

    When I plan my builds, I usually have 1-2 intake fans on the lower front of the case, blowing over the HDD's. As for the Exhaust, it's usually 2-3 fans on the top or top-rear. I am a huge fan of cases with fan openings on top. That's the best way to get the hot air out of there ^_^

    A general rule is to have more CFM(airflow) for exhausting heat than intake, if not equal amounts.

    Another route that you may consider.... Water-cooling. Before undertaking that however, do A LOT of research. It can be dangerous if you're not careful, but when done correctly, will yield great results.

    Good luck!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    756
    Wouldn't a better heatsink and fan make the room more hot? The better it is at dissipating heat from the CPU, the higher the temperature your room will be.

    If you do not have an A/C available, I suggest you have a double window fan to circulate the air around. One fan for intake, one for exhaust.

    First result from Google:
    http://www.amazon.com/Bionaire-BW230.../dp/B000065DKJ
    Otto Yiu
    Rsync Palace ● Providing offsite backups since 2007.
    Backomatic ● Hassle-free Automated cPanel/WHM, DirectAdmin, FTP, and MySQL backups.

Similar Threads

  1. In search of advice on Bay Area Colocation ... advice please
    By dumbluck in forum Colocation and Data Centers
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 04-02-2007, 05:04 AM
  2. Tell me your advice please
    By tedxuyuan in forum Web Hosting
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 11-01-2006, 02:53 AM
  3. Transit advice wanted, as well as advice on colocation space.
    By swiftway in forum Colocation and Data Centers
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 09-27-2005, 04:28 PM
  4. Replies: 9
    Last Post: 08-02-2004, 09:13 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •