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  1. #1
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    Question for who has a 10mbps unmetered server

    Hello,

    I know that there are a lot of threads talking about 10mbps unmetered lines, but I didn't want to go into other peoples threads with a different question:

    What is your download speed on your 10mbps unmetered server?

    We have a server that we can download this file:

    http://download.microsoft.com/downlo...dotnetfx35.exe

    with far less then 500kb/s, when I asked the DC for support about this I gott this answer:

    - You're on a 10Mbps network so you won't get over 1MB/s speeds.

    weird, as I have a 10mbps unmetered VPS in another location that can download that file at 6.5mb/s.

    When I asked again with another question, I got a new answer which was:

    6MBytes/s = 48Mbps
    So you can't be on a 10Mbps network.
    1 Bytes/s = 8 bit/s

    So my question is:

    What speed do you have? is this informations correct?

  2. #2
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    1MB/s = ~10Mbps
    10MB/s = ~100Mbps
    100MB/s = ~1000Mbps

  3. #3
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    10Mbit = 1.25MBit.

    Bits is the number of zeros/ones sent over the wire.
    A byte is an octet of bits, usually representing a character.

    Pretty much all carriers advertise in bits. Your computer displayed download speed in bytes.

  4. #4
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    Yeah but there's overhead, network conditions, etc

    Your 6.5MB/s is probably on a 100mbit port, shared, and you have about 3TB bandwidth per month to use.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by quantumphysics View Post

    Your 6.5MB/s is probably on a 100mbit port, shared, and you have about 3TB bandwidth per month to use.
    yeah, could be that!

    so this result in a 10mbps is ok:

    Connecting to download.microsoft.com|68.142.110.42|:80... connected.
    HTTP request sent, awaiting response... 200 OK
    Length: 242743296 (231M) [application/octet-stream]
    Saving to: `dotnetfx35.exe.1'

    2% [=> ] 6,587,514 402K/s eta 12m 54s^

  6. #6
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    Yes thats about 8.5 Mbit. Add the overhead quantumphysics mentioned, and that makes sense.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by quantumphysics View Post
    1MB/s = ~10Mbps
    10MB/s = ~100Mbps
    100MB/s = ~1000Mbps
    Wrong.
    1MB/s = 8Mbps
    10MB/s = 80Mbps
    100MB/s = 1000Mbps

    1 byte(B) is always exactly equal to 8 bits (b). There is absolutely no approximation involved.

    Quote Originally Posted by BostonGuru View Post
    10Mbit = 1.25MBit.
    I think you meant to say 10Mbit = 1.25MBytes.


    Quote Originally Posted by winger View Post
    so this result in a 10mbps is ok:

    2% [=> ] 6,587,514 402K/s eta 12m 54s^
    402KB/s = 3.216Mb/s, which is perfectly reasonable.

    Firstly, it is very unusual to see line speed with a single TCP data transfer. To truly benchmark your capacity, you should try using a network diagnostic tool like iperf, netperf, etc. rather than http/ftp. Even so, this only tells you what the capacity is between two particular locations, it will not tell you what either end is capable of.

    Secondly, transfer rates are strongly dependent on latency (RTT). 3.216Mb/s is lousy if transferring within the same data centre, but excellent when transferring between London and Beijing.
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by hhw View Post
    Wrong.
    1MB/s = 8Mbps
    10MB/s = 80Mbps
    100MB/s = 1000Mbps

    1 byte(B) is always exactly equal to 8 bits (b). There is absolutely no approximation involved.

    I think what he meant is the relation between the line speed, and what you will see downloading a file. I believe most file transfer statuses just take the difference of bytes for the file received over the time. It doesn't include packet headers, checksums, bad packets that failed the checksum and had to be resent, etc...

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by BostonGuru View Post
    I think what he meant is the relation between the line speed, and what you will see downloading a file. I believe most file transfer statuses just take the difference of bytes for the file received over the time. It doesn't include packet headers, checksums, bad packets that failed the checksum and had to be resent, etc...
    Hrrm... in that case, the converse would make a bit more sense
    i.e.
    10Mbps =~ 1MBps
    100Mbps =~ 10MBps
    1000Mbps =~ 100MBps

    so that you have a deflating, instead of an inflating effect.

    Or maybe I'm just overly pedantic >_< I'll blame it as an occupational hazard
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by hhw View Post
    Hrrm... in that case, the converse would make a bit more sense
    i.e.
    10Mbps =~ 1MBps
    100Mbps =~ 10MBps
    1000Mbps =~ 100MBps

    I think thats the same thing he wrote except you swapped sides of the equations.

    Regardless, I think the OP's question has been answered thoroughly enough.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by winger View Post
    When I asked again with another question, I got a new answer which was:

    6MBytes/s = 48Mbps
    So you can't be on a 10Mbps network.
    1 Bytes/s = 8 bit/s
    That's the result of confusion, which sometimes arises when you do not spell out bits and bytes.

    By the way, I was getting 1.3 million bytes a second downloading that file.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by tim2718281 View Post
    That's the result of confusion, which sometimes arises when you do not spell out bits and bytes.
    Yup.. some people don't know the difference of mb/s and mB/s.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by BostonGuru View Post
    I think thats the same thing he wrote except you swapped sides of the equations.
    The converse of a statement has a different logical inference.

    http://www.math.jhu.edu/~swang/logic.htm

    /pedantism
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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by BostonGuru View Post
    10Mbit = 1.25MBit.

    Bits is the number of zeros/ones sent over the wire.
    A byte is an octet of bits, usually representing a character.

    Pretty much all carriers advertise in bits. Your computer displayed download speed in bytes.
    You mean 10Mbit = 1.25MByte?

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by winger View Post
    Hello,

    I know that there are a lot of threads talking about 10mbps unmetered lines, but I didn't want to go into other peoples threads with a different question:

    What is your download speed on your 10mbps unmetered server?

    We have a server that we can download this file:

    http://download.microsoft.com/downlo...dotnetfx35.exe

    with far less then 500kb/s, when I asked the DC for support about this I gott this answer:

    - You're on a 10Mbps network so you won't get over 1MB/s speeds.

    weird, as I have a 10mbps unmetered VPS in another location that can download that file at 6.5mb/s.

    When I asked again with another question, I got a new answer which was:

    6MBytes/s = 48Mbps
    So you can't be on a 10Mbps network.
    1 Bytes/s = 8 bit/s

    So my question is:

    What speed do you have? is this informations correct?
    Your server that can do 6.5MBps is on a 100Mbps port.

    http://www.ibeast.com/content/tools/band-calc.asp

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by cheaptraffic
    You mean 10Mbit = 1.25MByte?
    Yes.

    Quote Originally Posted by hhw View Post
    The converse of a statement has a different logical inference.

    http://www.math.jhu.edu/~swang/logic.htm

    /pedantism

  17. #17
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    Argh. Again this talk about Mbps and MB/s ...

    Bandwidth is a RATE -> bits per second.

    Data transfer is an amount.

    Your server network port and the switch port don't know what is a BYTE. They move BITS.

    Network protocols don't know what is a byte. A sequence of 8 bits is called an octet, not a byte.

    Protocols use control bits, adding overhead for the payload transmitted in each packet.

    Eventually there are additional overhead due protocol acknowledgements, timeouts, retransmits, etc.

    It is wrong to say data transfer = bandwidth / 8

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