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  1. #1

    How to change SOA Serial

    Hi,

    I've just got a vps with centos5.3 using webmin and virtualmin. I'm just a beginner. Have setup bind with 4 nameservers.

    When I do DNS test via intodns.com

    I get the following error:

    Looks like your nameservers do not agree on the SOA serial. Ths SOA records as reported by your nameservers:
    69.10.134.195 -> 1245290320
    76.74.236.21 -> 1245290320
    98.142.208.120 -> 1245220342

    How to change the SOA seial either in Bind or zoneedit.com.

    Thanks!
    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    In bind, just increment the serial. It must increment to pick up the change.
    A good method to use it YYYYMMDDXX where XX is some double integer you can increment for multiple changes in the same day.
    Example -
    2009061710
    - then, if you need to correct and reload, you can change the 10 to 20. You can also use 01,02, etc, it just has to increase for bind to recognize the zone has changed and should be reloaded, otherwise it is skipped.

    Where is the serial? right where is says ;serial. make your dns change, increment the serial, reload bind (service named restart or rndc reload)

    Code:
    @     IN     SOA    dns1.example.com.     hostmaster.example.com. (
                        2001062501 ; serial
                        21600      ; refresh after 6 hours
                        3600       ; retry after 1 hour
                        604800     ; expire after 1 week
                        86400 )    ; minimum TTL of 1 day
    For zoneedit, don't use it, but most web based DNS services auto-increment when you make zone changes. If you are using multiple servers, make sure one is master, and the others are pulling zones from it (secondary servers).
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  3. #3
    How can I make zoneedit as secondary?

    Quote Originally Posted by mugo View Post
    In bind, just increment the serial. It must increment to pick up the change.
    A good method to use it YYYYMMDDXX where XX is some double integer you can increment for multiple changes in the same day.
    Example -
    2009061710
    - then, if you need to correct and reload, you can change the 10 to 20. You can also use 01,02, etc, it just has to increase for bind to recognize the zone has changed and should be reloaded, otherwise it is skipped.

    Where is the serial? right where is says ;serial. make your dns change, increment the serial, reload bind (service named restart or rndc reload)

    Code:
    @     IN     SOA    dns1.example.com.     hostmaster.example.com. (
                        2001062501 ; serial
                        21600      ; refresh after 6 hours
                        3600       ; retry after 1 hour
                        604800     ; expire after 1 week
                        86400 )    ; minimum TTL of 1 day
    For zoneedit, don't use it, but most web based DNS services auto-increment when you make zone changes. If you are using multiple servers, make sure one is master, and the others are pulling zones from it (secondary servers).

  4. #4
    What is the name and location of this file. Excuse my ignorance.

    Quote Originally Posted by mugo View Post
    In bind, just increment the serial. It must increment to pick up the change.
    A good method to use it YYYYMMDDXX where XX is some double integer you can increment for multiple changes in the same day.
    Example -
    2009061710
    - then, if you need to correct and reload, you can change the 10 to 20. You can also use 01,02, etc, it just has to increase for bind to recognize the zone has changed and should be reloaded, otherwise it is skipped.

    Where is the serial? right where is says ;serial. make your dns change, increment the serial, reload bind (service named restart or rndc reload)

    Code:
    @     IN     SOA    dns1.example.com.     hostmaster.example.com. (
                        2001062501 ; serial
                        21600      ; refresh after 6 hours
                        3600       ; retry after 1 hour
                        604800     ; expire after 1 week
                        86400 )    ; minimum TTL of 1 day
    For zoneedit, don't use it, but most web based DNS services auto-increment when you make zone changes. If you are using multiple servers, make sure one is master, and the others are pulling zones from it (secondary servers).

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by slamdunk View Post
    How can I make zoneedit as secondary?
    I'm not sure you can, without paying.
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  6. #6
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by slamdunk View Post
    What is the name and location of this file. Excuse my ignorance.
    In bind, depending on if you are using chroot version, it will be in either

    /var/named/ or /var/named/chroot/var/named

    The location is actually set in your named.conf, which itself can be a couple of different palaces. Just do a "locate named.conf" and you'll find it.
    Usually located in /etc/named.conf

    Each zone is actually a file, there are standards to the name of the file, but it really doesn't matter what the file is named. I use "db.domain.com.db". This file contains your actual zone record.
    Then, in named.conf, you load is as a master record.

    I would suggest you read up on named.conf and how to load zones, either as master or secondary. It's a bit hard to describe, but a quick read would do you wonders. Very basically, you create your zone file with your records, then load it by telling the path and type in named.conf.

    To make zoneedit a secondary, you'll have to add the IP address in your bind's named.conf to the "allow-transfer" directive. This gives zoneedit's IP the authority to ask and receive a copy of the zone. On the zone edit side, it should be a simple matter of creating a zone as a seondary, it should ask you for the IP of the master, and optionally what to call the file.
    You can also go the other way...use zoneedit as master, and your bind as secondary, then you don't have to mess with creating zone files in bind. They will be created for you when transfered from the master.

    DNS, although not rocket science, does have some "need to knows".
    This will get you started - http://www.freeos.com/articles/3956/
    It's just a matter of getting your head around how it works.

    Note - I've never used zoneedit, so maybe someone who has can give you specifics. I primarily just use bind, or DNSME for failover on my HA clients.
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  7. #7
    Thanks! How do I make bind secondary using webmin ?

  8. #8
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    Location
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    Quote Originally Posted by slamdunk View Post
    Thanks! How do I make bind secondary using webmin ?
    You would need to give the IP of your machine running bind to zoneedit, allowing it to pull secondaries from zone edit. Should be under "Allow Transfers" or something very similar.

    Then, in bind's named.conf, instead naming a zone master and giving the location of the zone file, you name it as secondary and give the IP of zoneedit's DNS server you are using. Bind will contact the IP and ask for the zones you have named in your named.conf.

    Example entry in named.conf to pull secondary from 199.227.55.3 (just an example IP):

    Code:
    zone "mydomain.com" {type slave; file "slaves/db.mydomain.com.slave"; masters { 199.227.55.3; };};
    Translated, "for zone mydomain.com, i want to pull a zone file, save it in slaves/db.mydomain.com.db and pull it from the master at 199.227.55.3

    Of course, substitute your own actual zone(s) and master dns IP.

    You'll need one for each zone you want to pull over. You do not create the slave/db.* files, this is just where they are stored after successful transfer to your secondary. If the transfer is successful, you'll see 'em come pouring into the dir.
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