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  1. #1
    Join Date
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    redhat vs freebsd...

    is it just me or is freebsd a LOT faster than redhat? i dunno whats going on... i am comparing the performance between a celeron 1.7ghz box (unitedcolo, $99/month offer) with half a gig of ram vs a 1ghz duron box (fdc servers) with half a gig of ram...

    and this duron box is serving a few million hits/day... and i can tar and gunzip and stuff MUCH faster on it than on the redhat box which was just setup (and has no sites on it/etc)...

    i don't get it... i would imagine there be a performance difference and freebsd would be a bit better... but not this much...

    am i missing something here?

    also... unitedcolo... obviously not experienced admins... their HD partition scheme (absolute default of redhat i think)... its bullsh*t... its plain out stupid... no space for mysql databases, larger partition for applications than data... simply idiotic... its about as impressive as their uptime calculations and guarantee...

    my 12 year old brother could configure a box better... ! and their PHP/etc... all old versions... its kinda a pain... i'd rather not have any of this stuff installed than having to go thru all of it and removing it and having to reinstall... plus... they said they installed webmin... well... big surprise... it wasn't here... so my friend was thinking he was doing something wrong cuz he couldn't access webmin... when it wasn't installed in the first place...

    i hate amateurs (unitedcolo)...

  2. #2
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    FreeBSD is amazing, it makes Linux look like a toy.

    I've converted over 3 medium/large Linux friendly clients and all of them have been happier with FreeBSD.

    Constant patching not required, increased reliability, a ports and packages system that a couple of Linux disties try to immitate.

    In my book, FreeBSD is a winner. Its just unfortunate that Linux received more attention, it personally feel it shouldn't have a place in the server market since BSD has been around longer and is more reliable. But things are changing
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  3. #3
    How much different, or difficult, is FreeBSD to learn and implement over Linux? I am putting together a server and looked at FreeBSD because it appears that people say it is very good. I was going to put Linux on the server but I am wondering if I should change...
    Richard
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  4. #4
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    Well if you're competent at Linux then BSD doesn't prove much of a learning curve at all.

    Some things are in different places, but the freebsd handbook (available online at www.freebsd.org) is a great introduction/reference material that'll help you.

    The most annoying thing for web hosts is that not enough control panels support it. Plesk supports FreeBSD, CPanel only have beta support, Ensim is Linux only.

    Best thing to do is set it up at home on a cheap box and play with it for a bit, you'll soon love it

    Oh, and the BSD mailing list is full of knowledgeable people who're always quick to help.

    Thinking about it, the biggest reason I love FreeBSD is because everything is centralised - the development team, mailing lists and documentation is all available on freebsd.org and all BSD teams (OpenBSD, NetBSD, and FreeBSD) are always helping each other. <it should be obvious by now that I love BSD>
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  5. #5
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    Aug 2002
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    FreeBSD > RedHat (or any other Linux)

  6. #6
    What is the current stable version of FreeBSD? I was a little confused with the new release schedule on freebsd.org . . . is the newest stable 4.6.2 or 4.7?
    Richard
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  7. #7
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    The latest -RELEASE is 4.6.2, and most would suggest you use that for production machines. The -RELEASE branch contains code which has been tested.

    the -STABLE branch consists of code which is working but not completely tested. I believe the latest is 4.7

    and the -CURRENT branch contains all the development code, use this only if you're crazy I think the latest in this branch is 5.0

    For more information please check the Release engineering page at http://www.freebsd.org/releng/index.html

  8. #8
    Thanks ice.
    Richard
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  9. #9
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    *

    I LOVE freebsd
    Nick Twaddell
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  10. #10
    FreeBSD makes a lot of things easier compared to Linux, and upgrading to newer releases is cakewalk(no need to reinstall or install from cd) FreeBSD can also be compatible with linux binaries so you wont be missing anything. Learning FreeBSD is easy and if you need any help, you can find all your answers at http://www.freebsd.org/handbook

  11. #11
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    Not to mention the TCP/IP stack increased in performance by around 25% for 4.6* - when it already outperformed *nix anyway

  12. #12
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    it all depends ... they both outperform each other in certain areas. now, i'm not too familiar with either, but i recall reading that linux handles directories w/ huge quantities of files in them far better than bsd (well, openbsd specifically). openbsd doesn't support multi-processors, where freebsd does. however, maybe linux outperforms freebsd when it comes to SMP. point being, do some research and test both out. i wouldn't make a decision on a "freebsd is better!" comment.

    later!
    Last edited by lotuslnd; 10-05-2002 at 06:59 PM.

  13. #13
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    freebsd seems more reliable
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  14. #14
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    ^^^ in what sense?

  15. #15
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    from mysql.com:

    <snip>

    Based on the preceding criteria, the best platforms for running MySQL at this point are x86 with SuSE Linux 7.1, 2.4 kernel, and ReiserFS (or any similar Linux distribution) and SPARC with Solaris 2.7 or 2.8. FreeBSD comes third, but we really hope it will join the top club once the thread library is improved.

    </snip>

    so if you're working with databases (MySQL specifically), you might want to look into linux.

  16. #16
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    Originally posted by lotuslnd
    so if you're working with databases (MySQL specifically), you might want to look into linux.
    Until version 5.0, of course. Linux outperforms FreeBSD on pretty much anything threaded (SMP, mysql, java, etc). Linux does the threading at the kernel level; FreeBSD does it at the user level.

    This is why on Linux you'll see multiple "processes" running for mysqld and java, even though only one true process exists.

    FreeBSD 5.0 is supposed to fix all of that. We shall see!
    Alex Llera
    Professional Server Management
    FreeBSD|Linux|HSphere|Cpanel|Plesk

  17. #17
    Join Date
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    I think that FreeBSD is great,....

    ahh, I got too lazy to finish my reply -- good night!
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  18. #18
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    Some other people have found that Linux doesn't enable disk DMA on the United.Colo boxes. It looks like the chipset isn't fully supported. This obviously kills disk performance.

    I have one on order (with Linux) and when I get it I'll do some more investigation. I turned up some info on Google that looks like it might help.

    I tried to install FreeBSD 4.5 on a spare box recently and it puked. Linux installed fine. The FreeBSD installer isn't too great either.

    Which is a pity, because there's a lot to like about FreeBSD.

    But there's no magic in either FreeBSD or Linux - if you're getting radically different performance between the two then one of them is set up wrong.

  19. #19
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    Anyone seen FreeBSD's login classes? We've used a patch to automatically kill any cgi-bin scripts that use too much cputime or memory - and I know others use this setup too.

    Can Linux do this? I don't think so

    Also, to address the installer question: the installer freebsd may not be the greatest thing around, and can be confusing if you haven't read the handbook on how to use it, but I found it actually works. I used RH and SuSE before and found the installers to be not good at doing the things I selected.

    The biggest reason I and possibly any other BSD admin prefer it over Linux is probably to do with the kernel. There's no 'patching' required, recompilation and customisation is one of the simplest things I've encountered on FreeBSD. On SuSE I tried recompiling it using some supplied GUI configuration tool at my system failed to boot with the new kernel... couldn't figure out why :/

    Anyway, I agree that the two have their own places and after tuning the two might be closer together in terms of performance... but I find BSD more admin friendly

  20. #20
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    Sure. As I say, there's a lot to like about FreeBSD, even if Linux does get all the press

    In another thread VS-Lap found what's probably the answer to netdude's problem:

    WOOHOO got it working now! The author sent me an updated via82cxxx.c file then I recompiled the kernel. VOILA!

    http://au.vansign.net/via82cxxx.c

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