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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Posts
    252

    Coldfusion or Unix/Linux?

    Im wondering whats the better of the two? Hmm the question might be too general. All i know is colfusion is still emerging.

    And would windows be good aswell?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Edmonton, Canada
    Posts
    978
    Cold fusion is an application software, not an operating system. You require cold fusion to run .CFM scripts which had their day over 2 years ago.

    If you haven't decided on a scripting language for interactive components of your site I'd sincerely suggest looking into PHP (http://www.php.net). You'll find it's much more widely supported by hosts and works on multiple platforms (windows, linux, eunuchs, etc.).

    As for Linux vs. Windows: most Linux zealots would say the penguin is more stable. A well-configured Windows server will operate just as long and work just as hard. What you'll want to do is find out if the host has taken necessary steps to secure and stabilize either of these platforms.

    Sincerely,

    -Matt

  3. #3
    Coldfusion is a programming language such as ASP or PHP. Comparing coldfusion with *nix is not possible.
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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Posts
    3,729
    I'd advise against going with windows unless you've already come to rely on ASP or MSSQL or some other proprietary MS stuff. A *nix environment is much more friendly and more cost effective in the long run.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    1,152
    Originally posted by lightnin
    I'd advise against going with windows unless you've already come to rely on ASP or MSSQL or some other proprietary MS stuff. A *nix environment is much more friendly and more cost effective in the long run.
    depends on what you consider cost effective, there is no equal to MSSQL in a heavy demand envionment when compaired to mysql or postgre ( both are cloese but the benchmarks still go to mssql )

    until unix has a great GUI windows will always have the larger install base. once the gui is perfected we will see percentage changes in the market towards the unix platform ( we are seeing it already but critical mass is not thier yet )

    mike
    I am Mike From ADEHOST.Com, Multidomain Windows hosting with Cold Fusion and ASP and Dot.NET Also offering multi-domain Unix hosting. silently, each one should ask, Have I done my daily task. Have I kept my honor bright, can I sleep without guilt tonight. Have I done and have I did, everything, to be prepared. - our motto to maintain services.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Posts
    3,729
    Originally posted by ADEhost


    depends on what you consider cost effective, there is no equal to MSSQL in a heavy demand envionment when compaired to mysql or postgre ( both are cloese but the benchmarks still go to mssql )

    until unix has a great GUI windows will always have the larger install base. once the gui is perfected we will see percentage changes in the market towards the unix platform ( we are seeing it already but critical mass is not thier yet )

    mike

    True about MSSQL...but I don't think that's a bit beyond the scope of what's being considered here.

    KDE is a pretty nice GUI, but it definately needs more time before it's going to really rival Windows. That's the desktop market though. Apples and oranges.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Location
    Tacoma, Washington
    Posts
    9,576
    I think for choice it'd be better to stick with Linux, at least at an affordable rate. Windows hosting usually costs more, due to the price of implimentation. Cold Fusion is a pretty expensive piece of software, and those costs need to be passed onto the customer to make it viable. Linux/MySQL/PHP are all cheap to free, which allows companies to lower pricing per account.

    Greg Moore
    Former Webhost... now, just a guy.

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