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  1. #1

    Question Great Interview Questions To Ask On Web Hosting Job Application

    Hi,

    What are some general questions you would ask on a hiring form for support ticket system staff?

    Like I know it depends on your personal preferences of your company's outlook determines what type of staff you need, but what are the "general" questions you would ask?

    Pretty sure a lot of people would like to chip in on this


  2. #2
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    Probably the 1st -

    Do u have past expiriance in customer-service & specificly tech-support? ... as bad service can cost u more clients then a professional tech-stuff can win over!
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  3. #3
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    Also don't forget to test their patience. Not many people have that.
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  4. #4
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    1. Give me a list of your past employers
    2. Why are you no longer working for them
    3. Do you have any problem with me contacting them

    That's really all you need to know.

    --Tina
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by amritrr View Post
    Also don't forget to test their patience. Not many people have that.
    That is a very good point. Some customers don't know a icon from a menu and so they wont understand something the first time around. (depending on client base) So, having to repeat something differently, the key is finding that different terminology, is important. It takes patience to walk someone through something, especially on the phone. They might not be so important in live chat or tickets, but still patience is needed.
    -Steven | u2-web, LLC - Clustered Shared Hosting
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  6. #6
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    I have many years past experience doing phone support and I have seen everything from the customer not knowing how to double click or where the start button was all the way to an older woman not knowing why her computer wouldn't work.... All she had was a monitor... /sigh Patience is a BIG thing.
    Chris Reed
    Revogate Inc.
    Revolutionizing Business Technology
    Web Hosting, XenServer Virtualization, and IT Consulting

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by RN-Chris View Post
    I have many years past experience doing phone support and I have seen everything from the customer not knowing how to double click or where the start button was all the way to an older woman not knowing why her computer wouldn't work.... All she had was a monitor... /sigh Patience is a BIG thing.
    there is also the opposite side of the coin ... you have a tech savvy client and you treat them like a N00b. That has happened to me with my ISP... makes me want to strangle them.
    Dana aka Laci My Alter Ego
    Former WHT Moderator

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Laci View Post
    there is also the opposite side of the coin ... you have a tech savvy client and you treat them like a N00b. That has happened to me with my ISP... makes me want to strangle them.
    An experienced tech will pick up on this and adapt as the need arises.
    Chris Reed
    Revogate Inc.
    Revolutionizing Business Technology
    Web Hosting, XenServer Virtualization, and IT Consulting

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by AH-Tina View Post
    1. Give me a list of your past employers
    2. Why are you no longer working for them
    3. Do you have any problem with me contacting them

    That's really all you need to know.

    --Tina
    K.I.S.S - Great Advice Tina!

  10. #10
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    I generally probe to see if someone can exhibit passion about something they've been involved with in the past. I like to know that spark is in there and that it can grow for what our team is doing as they feel like more of a part of it. That's contagious, and customers sense the enthusiasm.

    Beyond that, it's tough to find some general questions that will give you insight about different kinds of people (in support, or anywhere else). I'm usually most comfortable if I can tell they had an interest in our market before the interview.

    YMMV if you're just trying to fill seats.
    Jeff Standen, Chief of R&D, WebGroup Media LLC. - LinkedIn
    Cerb is a fast and flexible web-based platform for business collaboration and automation. http://www.cerbweb.com/

  11. #11
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    I always like to ask, where do you see yourself in two years time, always an interesting one to ask as well as what’s your strongest and weakest points
    Jon Black

  12. #12
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    Apr 2008
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    I tend to like to ask them "How much do you expect to get paid from this job?"

  13. #13
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    "Whats your greatest weak point?"

    Most people think the answer is "I don't have any" but what you really need is someone to say their weak point and how they plan on improving it.

  14. #14
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    Provide them with a technical issue that may come up more than occasionally (in various forms) and ask them to solve it, with a step-by-step verbal explanation. Even if the first step is to break out a Google search.

    Find out what the word "ethical" means to the person you're interviewing. I would much rather hire an ethical person who requires more training than the next guy if the next guy is likely to be a jerk or untrustworthy.

    Toss some larger than necessary words into the interview and see how the person you're interviewing reacts upon hearing them. This may be a sign that his or her communication skills could be not up to par. This person may be the front-line of your company's public image. The last thing you would want is someone who cannot speak well and does not know how to effectively listen.
    Bill - Support Analyst - Liveblock Auctions International
    http://www.LiveGlobalBid.com

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