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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Bharat
    Posts
    21

    Tips for not getting blacklisted

    Hi

    We will shortly moving from our Shared to Dedicated hosting (First time). The main reason being the outgoing mails..

    We need to send around 60k emails to our members/week (newsletter).
    Our hosting company allowed only 200 mails per hour.. thus getting sick of this .. we decided to get our own server.

    Now i have read many threads saying that they get blacklisted and their account being suspended..

    How do i ensure that i don't land up being BLACKLISTED ??? any tips.

    Please Note : Mails i m talking here are really genuine and should not be treated like SPAM
    Suraj Jain (ASP - Developer)
    ==========================================
    On Error Resume Next
    ==========================================

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    320
    1 - Require SPF and Domain Key records to make sure you are "legitimizing" the origin of your emails - particularly important if you are sending much to the majors like Yahoo, etc

    2 - insure that each domain you send from has valid spam@, webmaster@ and abuse@ email addresses.

    3 - respond to any complains extremely promptly - definitely within 24 hours, but preferably within 4 hours during the day.

    4 - Make certain that any message you send is CAN-Spam compliant.

    5 - Close your system to unauthorized email senders so that someone else can't blacken your email eye.

    6 - Monitor the blacklists religiously and immediately communicate with them if your IP's ever show up. (does very little good, but when combined with the above most will get to know you are serious about protecting the internet from spam).

    7 - Make sure your server is set up for detailed logging so you can track any abuse complaints accurately.

    What am I missing?

    Good luck,
    Joe
    https://ServersAndHosting.com
    Dedicated Servers | Guaranteed Hosting

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Agios Dimitrios,Attiki,GR
    Posts
    113

    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by domainworldaccess View Post
    1 - Require SPF and Domain Key records to make sure you are "legitimizing" the origin of your emails - particularly important if you are sending much to the majors like Yahoo, etc

    2 - insure that each domain you send from has valid spam@, webmaster@ and abuse@ email addresses.

    3 - respond to any complains extremely promptly - definitely within 24 hours, but preferably within 4 hours during the day.

    4 - Make certain that any message you send is CAN-Spam compliant.

    5 - Close your system to unauthorized email senders so that someone else can't blacken your email eye.

    6 - Monitor the blacklists religiously and immediately communicate with them if your IP's ever show up. (does very little good, but when combined with the above most will get to know you are serious about protecting the internet from spam).

    7 - Make sure your server is set up for detailed logging so you can track any abuse complaints accurately.

    What am I missing?

    Good luck,
    Joe
    Very good advices thanks

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    1,277
    I didn't see double opt-in mentioned there. Having double opt-in is a really good way to go. That might be part of the whole can-spam thing, not that it matters show me anything can-spam has done that was good for anyone.

    Your always going to fight with the spam lists, alot of isps maintain their own and you would basically need someone just to monitor and make sure you aren't being blacklisted 24/7. Larger isps and service providers have struck a deal with several governmental agencies so that they cannot have their ip space blacklisted (without legal repercussion). You might be better off outsourcing your e-mails to a company that is known in the industry for being able to deliver without issue. Otherwise I think your in for headaches. Even if you operate a 100% legitimate operation you would still run the chance of running into the 'paid' spam lists where spam is reported based on what you "donate". We all know how it works, the bigger companies that do this for a living are probably a little more expensive but it would benefit you in the long run!
    James Paul Woods
    Operations Manager
    HostKitty Internet Services

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Ahh' UnderPants
    Posts
    1,012
    yahoo is more prone to blacklist you without attempting to check what your stuff is, but you can contact their blacklisting team in advance to not let it happen.



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