Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1

    Why is my URL going to 2 different places?

    Hello,
    I'm having an odd problem.

    On my home computer if I ping mysite.com I get 207.210.88.88 which is the correct site pointing to my site at http://207.210.88.88/~username/

    However, on other computers at different locations I sometimes get 216.180.231.76 which is my OLD server

    Last summer I moved servers and since then I have noticed that sometimes I get the old site, sometimes the new one. My site was moved last summer within the same hosting company

    I have updated the DNS servers at my registrar (namecheap) to my latest assigned nameserver ns120a.genericdns.com and ns120b.genericdns.com (as assigned) and that did not seem to help! I also tried switching my DNS back to the old server for 12 hours, then switching back to the new ones (above) but I'm still getting the old site sometimes.


    Why are there 2 versions of my site on the web, and how can I get them all to ping to the right place?
    Is there a DNS setting somewhere that needs to be changed with my host? Or is this some kind of DNS/routing error?

    THANKS

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    1,429
    Hi

    If you use some tools like DNSstuff then it should become apparent, if there is an issue with the DNS, it does sounds like one has one setting and the other has the old setting, so they probably aren't getting synced.

    Hope that helps.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    531
    This sounds very much like you've got a dangling nameserver. Which is to say, you think you've got ns120a and ns120b.genericdns.com set for your domain but, in fact, there are one or more additional nameservers tied to the domain.

    Don't set 'em to your old values. That's counterproductive.

    But when you do a WHOIS, does it only show the two nameservers that you think it should? Or are there others, too?

  4. #4
    According to domain tools:

    ICANN Registrar: ENOM, INC.
    Created: 2002-07-30
    Expires: 2008-07-30
    Registrar Status: ok
    Name Server: NS120A.GENERICDNS.COM (has 2,845 domains)
    Name Server: NS120B.GENERICDNS.COM
    Whois Server: whois.enom.com

    As far as I know only these 2 nameservers...

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Houston, Texas, USA
    Posts
    2,955
    Try tracing the DNS response. Do a "dig yourdomain.net +trace" from the computer where you're getting the stale IP and post the output here.

    GL
    UNIXy - Fully Managed Servers and Clusters - Established in 2006
    [ cPanel Varnish Nginx Plugin ] - Enhance LiteSpeed and Apache Performance
    www.unixy.net - Los Angeles | Houston | Atlanta | Rotterdam
    Love to help pro bono (time permitting). joe > unixy.net

  6. #6
    Ok, thanks I'll have to wait until tomorrow when I'm back at that computer...

    Do I do this thru Windows "Run" and "CMD" where I did the ping?

    Oh, and are there other WHOIS tools that I can use that might show the other results? (the stale IP)

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Houston, Texas, USA
    Posts
    2,955
    Quote Originally Posted by kenfused View Post
    Ok, thanks I'll have to wait until tomorrow when I'm back at that computer...

    Do I do this thru Windows "Run" and "CMD" where I did the ping?

    Oh, and are there other WHOIS tools that I can use that might show the other results? (the stale IP)
    Download the tool (dig) from here: http://members.shaw.ca/nicholas.fong/dig/

    Once installed as in the tutorial, you should be able to run the command from CMD. Post both the stale and correct output here.
    UNIXy - Fully Managed Servers and Clusters - Established in 2006
    [ cPanel Varnish Nginx Plugin ] - Enhance LiteSpeed and Apache Performance
    www.unixy.net - Los Angeles | Houston | Atlanta | Rotterdam
    Love to help pro bono (time permitting). joe > unixy.net

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    5,842
    Ah, a Windows binary of dig - that's handy!

    kenfused, what you describe is nearly always caused by having the old nameservers set as NS records on your new hosting account. You can check this using dig (downloaded as above) with:
    Code:
    dig -t NS @NS120A.GENERICDNS.COM yourdomain.com
    Or go to a dns test site like dnsreport.com or intodns.com and run their report, where you'll see the old nameservers popping up as "stealth nameservers".

    If you have access to edit dns records through your control panel you can fix this yourself, but more likely you'll have to ask your host.
    Chris

    "Some problems are so complex that you have to be highly intelligent and well informed just to be undecided about them." - Laurence J. Peter

  9. #9
    OK, I ran the report.

    INteresting, no stealth DNS, however, should there be 207.210.88.89 and 207.210.88.88

    My site is only on the IP ending in .88, not .89, is this a problem?
    WHat are the recursive queries?

    (sorry so long, this is from intoDNS)
    NS records from your nameservers NS records got from your nameservers listed at the parent NS are:

    ns120b.genericdns.com ['207.210.88.89'] [TTL=14400]
    ns120a.genericdns.com ['207.210.88.88'] [TTL=14400]

    Recursive Queries I could use the nameservers listed below to performe recursive queries. It may be that I am wrong but the chances of that are low. You should not have nameservers that allow recursive queries as this will allow almost anyone to use your nameservers and can cause problems. Problem record(s) are:
    207.210.88.89
    207.210.88.88
    Same Glue The A records (the GLUE) got from the parent zone check are the same as the ones got from your nameservers. You have to make sure your parent server has the same NS records for your zone as you do according to the RFC. This tests only nameservers that are common at the parent and at your nameservers. If there are any missing or stealth nameservers you should see them below!
    Glue for NS records INFO: GLUE was not sent when I asked your nameservers for your NS records.This is ok but you should know that in this case an extra A record lookup is required in order to get the IPs of your NS records. The nameservers without glue are:
    207.210.88.89
    207.210.88.88
    You can fix this for example by adding A records to your nameservers for the zones listed above.
    Mismatched NS records OK. The NS records at all your nameservers are identical.
    DNS servers responded Good. All nameservers listed at the parent server responded.
    Name of nameservers are valid OK. All of the NS records that your nameservers report seem valid.
    Multiple Nameservers Good. You have multiple nameservers. According to RFC2182 section 5 you must have at least 3 nameservers, and no more than 7. Having 2 nameservers is also ok by me.
    Nameservers are lame OK. All the nameservers listed at the parent servers answer authoritatively for your domain.
    Missing nameservers reported by parent OK. All NS records are the same at the parent and at your nameservers.
    Missing nameservers reported by your nameservers OK. All nameservers returned by the parent server a.gtld-servers.net are the same as the ones reported by your nameservers.
    Domain CNAMEs OK. RFC1912 2.4 and RFC2181 10.3 state that there should be no CNAMEs if an NS (or any other) record is present.
    NSs CNAME check OK. RFC1912 2.4 and RFC2181 10.3 state that there should be no CNAMEs if an NS (or any other) record is present.
    Different subnets WARNING: Not all of your nameservers are in different subnets
    IPs of nameservers are public Ok. Looks like the IP addresses of your nameservers are public. This is a good thing because it will prevent DNS delays and other problems like
    DNS servers allow TCP connection OK. Seems all your DNS servers allow TCP connections. This is a good thing and usefull even if UDP connections are used by default.
    Different autonomous systems WARNING: Single point of failure
    Stealth NS records sent Ok. No stealth ns records are sent
    OK, I ran the report

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    5,842
    The .88 and .89 IP addresses aren't a problem - those are your 2 nameservers. Recursive queries aren't a problem for you (although it's a bad setup and might possibly become a problem for other people). No glue - most likely your domain isn't a .com or a .net? If so that's normal. And no stealth nameservers, which is good.

    In short, there's nothing there to account for your problem...
    Chris

    "Some problems are so complex that you have to be highly intelligent and well informed just to be undecided about them." - Laurence J. Peter

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    322
    Have you ever setup a hard-coded IP address for the site in the Windows equivalent of /etc/hosts (can't remember the full path in Windows - search for "hosts" to find it). That might be causing that one machine to see the wrong address because it's bypassing DNS entirely.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Greece
    Posts
    390
    Quote Originally Posted by Panopta View Post
    Have you ever setup a hard-coded IP address for the site in the Windows equivalent of /etc/hosts (can't remember the full path in Windows - search for "hosts" to find it). That might be causing that one machine to see the wrong address because it's bypassing DNS entirely.
    the path is %systemroot%\system32\drivers\etc\hosts
    NOT a webhost!helping here just for the fun of it!
    G(r)eek inside.

  13. #13
    Did you decommission your old name servers?

    Or at least get the zone removed from the old name servers?

    If not, then you need to do it.

    I won't explain why because it involves me bashing a piece of dns software.
    edgedirector.com
    managed dns global failover and load balance (gslb)
    exactstate.com
    uptime report for webhostingtalk.com

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    531
    Quote Originally Posted by plumsauce View Post
    Did you decommission your old name servers?

    Or at least get the zone removed from the old name servers?

    If not, then you need to do it.

    I won't explain why because it involves me bashing a piece of dns software.
    If the old name servers are no longer listed as authoritative, why bother? There won't be any queries to them....

    I'd like to know why you say that. And what software do you want to not bash? BIND? If so, too late! It's been being bashed for years.... (Did the OP identify the old name servers? How do you know what they're running if not?)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •