Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 40 of 47
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    517

    The FreeBSD vs. Cent OS Debate

    I am about to buy a server to lease... and I was wondering FreeBSD or Cent OS?

    I wanted to go with FreeBSD because it is known for the best uptime; but, are there drawbacks?
    TWC, LLC - USA based w/ three teams behind us!
    We will beat any web development or design quote

    http://totalwebcentral.com/

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    877
    Quote Originally Posted by WHC - Travis View Post
    I wanted to go with FreeBSD because it is known for the best uptime; but, are there drawbacks?
    Can't imagine many, other than driver support. But, if the provider offers to install FBSD, than driver support shouldn't be an issue.

    Some major COTS software may not work on FreeBSD or at least be harder to get to work. Everything else probably has a port or can be compiled.

    Many people consider xBSD (FreeBSD, OpenBSD, and otherwise) to have a superior development model and release process vs. most Linux distributions. Stability itself and robustness seems to me less of a factor, though perhaps 5+ years ago you could have said that.

    I won't get into the religious side of the debate (kernel, filesystem, and ports superiority, etc.). FreeBSD is a fine operating system and I don't think you'd do yourself wrong using it.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    8,910
    Drawbacks?

    I suppose you could get bored without having to patch your kernel every other week and all the time you'll save from having to dick around with RPM's and stale dependencies!

    Let the debate begin!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    5,627
    Quote Originally Posted by Pat H View Post
    Drawbacks?

    I suppose you could get bored without having to patch your kernel every other week and all the time you'll save from having to dick around with RPM's and stale dependencies!

    Let the debate begin!
    Or you could deal with an OS that has sketchy hardware support at best for new hardware

    But you'd be more secure, thats for sure.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    8,910
    Quote Originally Posted by RyanD View Post
    Or you could deal with an OS that has sketchy hardware support at best for new hardware

    But you'd be more secure, thats for sure.
    What new hardware would that be?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    L.A., CA
    Posts
    3,706

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    California USA
    Posts
    13,294
    Quote Originally Posted by Pat H View Post
    What new hardware would that be?
    I dont have the specific models handy right now but there are a few new raid cards that have issues on FBSD.
    Steven Ciaburri | Industry's Best Server Management - Rack911.com
    Software Auditing - 400+ Vulnerabilities Found - Quote @ https://www.RACK911Labs.com
    Fully Managed Dedicated Servers (Las Vegas, New York City, & Amsterdam) (AS62710)
    FreeBSD & Linux Server Management, Security Auditing, Server Optimization, PCI Compliance

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Vancouver, B.C.
    Posts
    2,656
    Quote Originally Posted by Steven View Post
    I dont have the specific models handy right now but there are a few new raid cards that have issues on FBSD.
    The RAID cards that you would want to run, run fine on FreeBSD (3ware, Areca, etc...).

    It's the RAID cards you don't want to run that tend to have problems. Mostly, because they are unwilling to release documentation, as it exposes all the horrific hardware bugs that they're riddled with, and thus stick to binary blobs *cough, cough, Adaptec*

    Besides, once drivers hit FreeBSD-STABLE, you at least know they are complete and will work properly. There are way too many half-baked drivers that make it into production releases in the Linux world.
    ASTUTE HOSTING: Advanced, customized, and scalable solutions with AS54527 Premium Canadian Optimized Network (Level3, PEER1, Shaw, Tinet)
    MicroServers.io: Enterprise Dedicated Hardware with IPMI at VPS-like Prices using AS63213 Affordable Bandwidth (Cogent, HE, Tinet)
    Dedicated Hosting, Colo, Bandwidth, and Fiber out of Vancouver, Seattle, LA, Toronto, NYC, and Miami

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    88
    Quote Originally Posted by hhw View Post
    The RAID cards that you would want to run, run fine on FreeBSD (3ware, Areca, etc...).
    I would caution you to check compatibility on specific cards before assuming they will work with FreeBSD.

    For example, we found that the 3Ware 9550 is well supported under FreeBSD but the newer 9650 card was not supported or was bleeding edge (this info was from a few months ago).
    rootbsd.net :: BSD based hosting for smart people
    FreeBSD VPS :: FreeBSD and OpenBSD Hosting Powered By Xen
    IRC: #rootbsd on freenode
    twitter: @rootbsd

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by WHC - Travis View Post
    I am about to buy a server to lease... and I was wondering FreeBSD or Cent OS?

    I wanted to go with FreeBSD because it is known for the best uptime; but, are there drawbacks?
    The only real drawback for most people is they are not familiar enough with FreeBSD. If you are comfortable with FreeBSD and research issues before you install software you will find it is a nice system to use and admin.

  11. #11
    Do you plan on running any software or services that are platform dependent? If you plan on running cPanel forget about BSD.

    Each OS has a learning curve, but there are many more factors for server uptime beyond the OS. In addition to the OS choice, I would focus on making the system more redundant. I.E. raid mirror, ECC ram, solid network, etc..
    Fast SSD Dedicated Servers || 24/7 365 Support || Money-Back Guarantee
    Dedicated Servers || Colocation || IP Transit
    Need to get in touch? Drop us an email at info[at]quadix.co

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    8,910
    Quote Originally Posted by volumedrive View Post
    If you plan on running cPanel forget about BSD.
    What?!

    cPanel and FreeBSD work beautifully together!

  13. #13
    Just stating that it seems that cPanel and RHEL are the defacto standard in the industry, and therefore has a much more abundant community support. Nothing against BSD ; )

    Another thing to consider would be ports vs. yum..
    Fast SSD Dedicated Servers || 24/7 365 Support || Money-Back Guarantee
    Dedicated Servers || Colocation || IP Transit
    Need to get in touch? Drop us an email at info[at]quadix.co

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    8,910
    Quote Originally Posted by volumedrive View Post
    Just stating that it seems that cPanel and RHEL are the defacto standard in the industry, and therefore has a much more abundant community support. Nothing against BSD ; )

    Another thing to consider would be ports vs. yum..
    cPanel and Linux are the defacto standards in this industry because they are "easier" to use for most people and more known, which doesn't necessarily make them better. I started out with Linux (Slackware) many, many years ago and made the switch to FreeBSD and haven't looked back in regards to ease of use, reliability and security.

    I think if more people were aware of FreeBSD or at least gave it a shot while "learning the ropes" of all things *NIX, they would probably find FreeBSD has a much lower learning curve with better results in the end.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    32
    I have dealt with FreeBSD, CentOS and Fedora Core in my various internet hosting ventures over the years. If you are comfortable doing your own admin, or have other sources you can get the information you need from, then FreeBSD is an excellent way to go. It is incredibly stable, and decent to secure. cPanel runs JUST fine on it. The ports system was easy enough to learn. File locations are a bit different, but if one has learned CentOS, then it is a fairly easy move over to FreeBSD.

    Currently I am on a CentOS 5 server and it runs just fine with no downtime yet. I was just as happy on a FreeBSD 6.2 server. If you prefer FreeBSD, I don't see any reason not to use it.

  16. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Pat H View Post
    cPanel and Linux are the defacto standards in this industry because they are "easier" to use for most people and more known, which doesn't necessarily make them better. I started out with Linux (Slackware) many, many years ago and made the switch to FreeBSD and haven't looked back in regards to ease of use, reliability and security.

    I think if more people were aware of FreeBSD or at least gave it a shot while "learning the ropes" of all things *NIX, they would probably find FreeBSD has a much lower learning curve with better results in the end.


    Good point. If you take the time to master anything it becomes more clear and understood. So to each his own. At the end of the day, I'm still a Debian fan : p
    Fast SSD Dedicated Servers || 24/7 365 Support || Money-Back Guarantee
    Dedicated Servers || Colocation || IP Transit
    Need to get in touch? Drop us an email at info[at]quadix.co

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    517
    Quote Originally Posted by AFerrier View Post
    Will you be the person managing the machine?
    Not likely, why would that be a factor?
    TWC, LLC - USA based w/ three teams behind us!
    We will beat any web development or design quote

    http://totalwebcentral.com/

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    517
    Quote Originally Posted by Mystikk View Post
    I have dealt with FreeBSD, CentOS and Fedora Core in my various internet hosting ventures over the years. If you are comfortable doing your own admin, or have other sources you can get the information you need from, then FreeBSD is an excellent way to go. It is incredibly stable, and decent to secure. cPanel runs JUST fine on it. The ports system was easy enough to learn. File locations are a bit different, but if one has learned CentOS, then it is a fairly easy move over to FreeBSD.

    Currently I am on a CentOS 5 server and it runs just fine with no downtime yet. I was just as happy on a FreeBSD 6.2 server. If you prefer FreeBSD, I don't see any reason not to use it.
    I am very familiar with Cent OS because I trust it. I would be running cPanel. I have plenty of resources since I have been in IT since I was born... so if your question is about adminstration only then I guess the answer is: no problem.

    Where the issue lies is remote administration. Is it harder to add new software / new applications to a BSD environment vs. a linux environment?
    TWC, LLC - USA based w/ three teams behind us!
    We will beat any web development or design quote

    http://totalwebcentral.com/

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    8,910
    Quote Originally Posted by WHC - Travis View Post
    Where the issue lies is remote administration. Is it harder to add new software / new applications to a BSD environment vs. a linux environment?
    I personally believe adding new software to a FreeBSD server is much easier, but again that's just my opinion. When you add software to a FreeBSD server you have 3 common options, 2 of which are incredibly easy.

    Just for demonstration purposes, I'm going to pretend we're going to install the wget software:

    Using the package system which is the easiest method of adding new software. If you wanted to add wget, it would be as simple as typing pkg_add -r wget and FreeBSD will download the latest package along with any required dependencies then install them.
    Using the ports system which requires a single command line (but can also be split up into several commands) and the requirement that you know exactly where the port is located on the system.

    cd /usr/ports/ftp/wget/ && make install clean

    or

    cd /usr/ports/ftp/wget/
    make install clean
    With any *NIX OS, you always have the option of manually downloading the source code, configuring it, compiling it and then running a make install. This method offers more flexibility for configuration options, but it is the least user-friendly.
    If you take a look at the FreeBSD handbook they explain the package and ports system in more depth, along with other configuration options and where you can go to browse the ports system.

    FreeBSD Handbook:
    http://www.freebsd.org/doc/en_US.ISO...ooks/handbook/

    FreeBSD Handbook (Applications & Ports):
    http://www.freebsd.org/doc/en_US.ISO...ook/ports.html
    Last edited by Patrick; 02-27-2008 at 08:44 AM.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Greece
    Posts
    2,123
    I manage a lot of linux servers during 1998-2006 (redhat, slackware, debian). Now I transfer everything to freebsd. It's the easiest OS for server I work with so far. Some of the things I like:

    1) Powerful ports system
    2) Easier to patch server
    3) Easier to configure firewall
    4) Good documentation

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    517
    Thanks guys! FreeBSD it is. I did some research last year but I wanted to check with some admin experts before I bought a server.

    Also a few other questions:
    How to setup a good spam filtering system?
    Best way to protect root password?

    Again, I will be doing all monitoring remotely from my desktop PC which will likely be running Cent OS and will be behind multiple hardware and software firewalls.
    TWC, LLC - USA based w/ three teams behind us!
    We will beat any web development or design quote

    http://totalwebcentral.com/

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    6,889
    Quote Originally Posted by hhw View Post
    Besides, once drivers hit FreeBSD-STABLE, you at least know they are complete and will work properly. There are way too many half-baked drivers that make it into production releases in the Linux world.
    I would say that something working, even if it doesn't have a full feature set, is better than something not working... FreeBSD's USB support is still terrible, can't boot it off a USB CD-ROM on most boxes, taking YEARS to support USB CD-ROMs and USB keyboards in general, etc. As I said, working is better than not, and you can NEVER count on FreeBSD supporting newer hardware anytime soon.

    Overall, if you're managing the box and you're more comfortable with Linux definitely go with Linux. If you're more comfortable with FreeBSD go with FreeBSD. It all comes down to the administrator, if you can't properly run and secure a FreeBSD box it is going to be worse than a CentOS/Linux box.
    Karl Zimmerman - Steadfast: Managed Dedicated Servers and Premium Colocation
    karl @ steadfast.net - Sales/Support: 312-602-2689
    Cloud Hosting, Managed Dedicated Servers, Chicago Colocation, and New Jersey Colocation
    Now Open in New Jersey! - Contact us for New Jersey colocation or dedicated servers

  23. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by WHC - Travis View Post
    Thanks guys! FreeBSD it is. I did some research last year but I wanted to check with some admin experts before I bought a server.

    Also a few other questions:
    How to setup a good spam filtering system?
    Best way to protect root password?

    Again, I will be doing all monitoring remotely from my desktop PC which will likely be running Cent OS and will be behind multiple hardware and software firewalls.
    The best way to setup spam filter is using your firewall to block blacklisted IP's along with services built into your control panel.
    The best way to protect your root password is to change it often and keep it different from any other password you use. If you are going to login via ssh as root use ssh keys or create an account and su to root and disallow root logins in the sshd_config.

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    6,889
    Quote Originally Posted by Pat H View Post
    I personally believe adding new software to a FreeBSD server is much easier, but again that's just my opinion. When you add software to a FreeBSD server you have 3 common options, 2 of which are incredibly easy.
    And to install software on a CentOS box you run "yum install softwarepackage" So how is FreeBSD easier than running one single command? Then updating all the packages, "yum update"...
    Karl Zimmerman - Steadfast: Managed Dedicated Servers and Premium Colocation
    karl @ steadfast.net - Sales/Support: 312-602-2689
    Cloud Hosting, Managed Dedicated Servers, Chicago Colocation, and New Jersey Colocation
    Now Open in New Jersey! - Contact us for New Jersey colocation or dedicated servers

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Ashburn VA, San Diego CA
    Posts
    4,571
    The current release (6.2) works fine with USB KVM (our KVM/IP's are USB based). You might want to enable "Legacy USB" in your bios for older releases to see if that helps.

    Booting from USB CD-ROM, I would not consider important for everyone if it is indeed true what you say.

    Example, we boot/install from PXE network and have no need for CD/Floppy drives at all, and FreeBSD is perfectly happy with this.
    Fast Serv Networks, LLC | AS29889 | Fully Managed Cloud, Streaming, Dedicated Servers, Colo by-the-U
    Since 2003 - Ashburn VA + San Diego CA Datacenters

  26. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by KarlZimmer View Post
    I would say that something working, even if it doesn't have a full feature set, is better than something not working... FreeBSD's USB support is still terrible, can't boot it off a USB CD-ROM on most boxes, taking YEARS to support USB CD-ROMs and USB keyboards in general, etc. As I said, working is better than not, and you can NEVER count on FreeBSD supporting newer hardware anytime soon.

    Overall, if you're managing the box and you're more comfortable with Linux definitely go with Linux. If you're more comfortable with FreeBSD go with FreeBSD. It all comes down to the administrator, if you can't properly run and secure a FreeBSD box it is going to be worse than a CentOS/Linux box.
    I just installed freebsd via KVM over IP and a usb cdrom drive last weekend. Also I must mention that the cdrom had corrupt files on it and I was still able to access the install files via the ftp option for install in sysinstall and complete my remote installation. I use both freebsd and centos for my server cluster and I am really starting to prefer freebsd over linux. especially when it comes to packet filtering and recompiling your kernel.

  27. #27
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    8,910
    Quote Originally Posted by KarlZimmer View Post
    How is FreeBSD easier than running one single command? Then updating all the packages, "yum update"...
    One command to install:
    pkg_add -r softwarepackage

    One command to update all ports:
    portupgrade -ra

    There's also portaudit that will tell you what ports have known security flaws... but I'm sure a similar command exists with Linux?

  28. #28
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    8,910
    Quote Originally Posted by KarlZimmer View Post
    It all comes down to the administrator, if you can't properly run and secure a FreeBSD box it is going to be worse than a CentOS/Linux box.
    I'm confused by this comment... are you suggesting that CentOS is more secure out of the box compared to FreeBSD? I sure hope I just misread that comment!

  29. #29
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Greece
    Posts
    2,123
    A minimal freebsd installation is more secure out of the box compared to linux distros because you install everything you need later instead of disabling services/programs that you don't need like linux. But a good admin can secure linux as good as freebsd if he knows what he is doing.

  30. #30
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    32
    Quote Originally Posted by WHC - Travis View Post
    I am very familiar with Cent OS because I trust it. I would be running cPanel. I have plenty of resources since I have been in IT since I was born... so if your question is about adminstration only then I guess the answer is: no problem.

    Where the issue lies is remote administration. Is it harder to add new software / new applications to a BSD environment vs. a linux environment?
    I haven't had any difficulty adding new software to FreeBSD systems. The ports system is well documented and easy enough to use. While it is not quite the same as using yum install blah, it is simple and powerful. When I got my first FreeBSD dedi, I had no experience other than with an FC VPS, so I had to learn a bit, but my background with linux carried over quite well, and the available documentation for FreeBSD was enough to learn what I couldn't quickly figure out on my own.

    I have had 2 FreeBSD servers, and both were rock solid steady. Mind you, I have had zero issues with CentOS 5.x on my current server as well, so I really can't complain about that.

  31. #31
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    6,889
    Quote Originally Posted by Pat H View Post
    One command to install:
    pkg_add -r softwarepackage

    One command to update all ports:
    portupgrade -ra

    There's also portaudit that will tell you what ports have known security flaws... but I'm sure a similar command exists with Linux?
    Yes, so it is the same, not easier. That was my point.
    Karl Zimmerman - Steadfast: Managed Dedicated Servers and Premium Colocation
    karl @ steadfast.net - Sales/Support: 312-602-2689
    Cloud Hosting, Managed Dedicated Servers, Chicago Colocation, and New Jersey Colocation
    Now Open in New Jersey! - Contact us for New Jersey colocation or dedicated servers

  32. #32
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    6,889
    Quote Originally Posted by Pat H View Post
    I'm confused by this comment... are you suggesting that CentOS is more secure out of the box compared to FreeBSD? I sure hope I just misread that comment!
    Yes, it seems you have a reading comprehension issue. What proper administrator is going to run a simple "out of the box" configuration??
    Karl Zimmerman - Steadfast: Managed Dedicated Servers and Premium Colocation
    karl @ steadfast.net - Sales/Support: 312-602-2689
    Cloud Hosting, Managed Dedicated Servers, Chicago Colocation, and New Jersey Colocation
    Now Open in New Jersey! - Contact us for New Jersey colocation or dedicated servers

  33. #33
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    6,889
    Quote Originally Posted by hsphereclub View Post
    I just installed freebsd via KVM over IP and a usb cdrom drive last weekend. Also I must mention that the cdrom had corrupt files on it and I was still able to access the install files via the ftp option for install in sysinstall and complete my remote installation. I use both freebsd and centos for my server cluster and I am really starting to prefer freebsd over linux. especially when it comes to packet filtering and recompiling your kernel.
    Ah, yes, it works with one hardware configuration so it must work on everything, right?

    First of all, the USB keyboard thing was fixed awhile ago, in one of the later 5.x releases I believe. My point was, USB keyboards had been a standard for like 5+ years before they had proper support for it, to me, that is ridiculous.

    We have noticed the booting off a CD-ROM issue with all the Intel based Supermicro boards we have and various other systems using Intel chipsets.
    Karl Zimmerman - Steadfast: Managed Dedicated Servers and Premium Colocation
    karl @ steadfast.net - Sales/Support: 312-602-2689
    Cloud Hosting, Managed Dedicated Servers, Chicago Colocation, and New Jersey Colocation
    Now Open in New Jersey! - Contact us for New Jersey colocation or dedicated servers

  34. #34

    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by KarlZimmer View Post
    Ah, yes, it works with one hardware configuration so it must work on everything, right?

    First of all, the USB keyboard thing was fixed awhile ago, in one of the later 5.x releases I believe. My point was, USB keyboards had been a standard for like 5+ years before they had proper support for it, to me, that is ridiculous.

    We have noticed the booting off a CD-ROM issue with all the Intel based Supermicro boards we have and various other systems using Intel chipsets.
    Ahhh I see now. You were being a little broad with your original statement.

  35. #35
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    New York, NY
    Posts
    10,574
    Quote Originally Posted by CretaForce View Post
    A minimal freebsd installation is more secure out of the box compared to linux distros because you install everything you need later instead of disabling services/programs that you don't need like linux. But a good admin can secure linux as good as freebsd if he knows what he is doing.
    Have you ever heard of a minimal install (CentOS)?

  36. #36
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    8,910
    Quote Originally Posted by KarlZimmer View Post
    What proper administrator is going to run a simple "out of the box" configuration??
    Proper administrator? Non.

    It doesn't matter though, many so called "administrators" are going to go with the default "out of the box" settings and this is why so many Linux servers are compromised. The same can be said for any OS given time, but the fact is that Linux "out of the box" is not nearly as secure as FreeBSD.

    If you take two servers, one FreeBSD & one Linux, install a control panel on both and leave the default settings in place, then put 100 random web hosting clients on each server and let it sit around for a few months... take a guess as to what server is going to get compromised first?

    I know what you're thinking, who the hell would do such a thing and neglect securing a server from the very start and/or fail to maintain the security and stay current with the latest threats? Just browse the WHT technical section on any given day... it's frightening.

  37. #37
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    8,910
    Quote Originally Posted by layer0 View Post
    Have you ever heard of a minimal install (CentOS)?
    A minimal install is still not going to protect someone from a local kernel exploit.

    I can't remember the last time FreeBSD has had a flaw in the default kernel that allowed someone to gain root, but it seems Linux has that problem every couple of years?

    Please correct me if I'm wrong, as I do admit I am somewhat ignorant with all things Linux in the last several years.

  38. #38
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    6,889
    Quote Originally Posted by Pat H View Post
    Proper administrator? Non.

    It doesn't matter though, many so called "administrators" are going to go with the default "out of the box" settings and this is why so many Linux servers are compromised. The same can be said for any OS given time, but the fact is that Linux "out of the box" is not nearly as secure as FreeBSD.

    If you take two servers, one FreeBSD & one Linux, install a control panel on both and leave the default settings in place, then put 100 random web hosting clients on each server and let it sit around for a few months... take a guess as to what server is going to get compromised first?

    I know what you're thinking, who the hell would do such a thing and neglect securing a server from the very start and/or fail to maintain the security and stay current with the latest threats? Just browse the WHT technical section on any given day... it's frightening.
    OK, so we're agreed, the primary difference is the administrator, not the OS. From my experience, CentOS can be as secure and reliable as FreeBSD and because it is what I and my staff are most comfortable with, that is what we use.

    Also, if you do nothing to the server they'll both get compromised, as one of those customers is bound to have a PHP exploit, and the box will be sending DDoS's to congest the bandwidth in no time with a base config on either.
    Karl Zimmerman - Steadfast: Managed Dedicated Servers and Premium Colocation
    karl @ steadfast.net - Sales/Support: 312-602-2689
    Cloud Hosting, Managed Dedicated Servers, Chicago Colocation, and New Jersey Colocation
    Now Open in New Jersey! - Contact us for New Jersey colocation or dedicated servers

  39. #39
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    New York, NY
    Posts
    10,574
    Quote Originally Posted by Pat H View Post
    A minimal install is still not going to protect someone from a local kernel exploit.
    And when did I claim that it would?

    My post was in regards to disabling services.

  40. #40
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Vancouver, B.C.
    Posts
    2,656
    Quote Originally Posted by KarlZimmer View Post
    I would say that something working, even if it doesn't have a full feature set, is better than something not working...
    That may be true for a desktop environment, but I would definitely refute that for a production server. I'd much rather have something not work at all, then work in a substandard fashion. The last thing you need is to find out that there's a data corruption bug in the drivers for your RAID card. If you really want the latest driver support, you can find it in the -CURRENT branch.

    And Linux doesn't always have support for hardware first. I had an old P1 as a wireless AP running PicoBSD purely configured through /etc/rc.conf long before there were any proper wireless drivers in Linux mainline.

    Linux does binary packages well, but it handless source packages very poorly. FreeBSD does a good job of both. The beauty of ports is that it's completely orthagonal to compiling source yourself, except the package management is built-in. Perhaps you have to code enough C to truly appreciate the beauty of that, but give me make over yum or apt-get any day.
    ASTUTE HOSTING: Advanced, customized, and scalable solutions with AS54527 Premium Canadian Optimized Network (Level3, PEER1, Shaw, Tinet)
    MicroServers.io: Enterprise Dedicated Hardware with IPMI at VPS-like Prices using AS63213 Affordable Bandwidth (Cogent, HE, Tinet)
    Dedicated Hosting, Colo, Bandwidth, and Fiber out of Vancouver, Seattle, LA, Toronto, NYC, and Miami

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •