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  1. #1

    Thinking of starting a new Data Center

    I am thinking of starting a new data center in Irvine, CA. Now before you guy's go bashing, I am not thinking of starting something with 4-5 racks for my hosting company in the closet in a 400 sqft office, I am thinking of starting a full blown data center. Heres the cost's I've factored in already, what I am looking for is people to let me know if a) They think that there is a market for this (I have done research, most data centers in Orange County are over priced, I plan on offering the services at an affordable rate.)

    What's needed:
    Warehouse/Office Space(all in one): $4,000 monthly
    2x 1GBPS connection's: $46,000 Monthly (Yes this is not much for a data center, but we figure we should use what we can afford before trying to get more, no sense paying for 2x10gbps connections if you don't need them yet!)
    Racks: $1,000 each
    Improvements to the Office/Warehouse: $10,000 (I'm also a contractor so I can cut cost's that way)
    Dedicated Servers: $1000-3,500 each(Yes, I plan on offering dedicated servers as well.)
    Switches, and other hardware: $10,000
    Security: $5,000 (installing a camera system, bigger locks with fingerprint access, plexy glass windows, etc.)
    Other Office Equipment: $10,000 (computer's, phone system, etc.)
    Total Startup Fee: $65,000x20%=78,000(this includes 20 full lockable racks, 15-20 servers with backup parts on hand, and 20% extra for any extra things that come up.
    Total monthly cost:$51,000 + Staff salary's (I plan on having a small staff at first, 1 tech per shift.)

    Total Startup funds: $200,000. (running cost's for the first few months included + extra money to get more racks etc. as we get more customers)

    What do you think? Is there anything major I left out here? I plan on hiring a network engineer to help me set everything up.

    Also, do you think that something like this would even be profitable in the long run? I mean that is the reason we go into business isn't it?

    Just looking for your $0.02..

  2. #2
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    Off the top of my head I don't see anything there about cooling, backup power, UPS for switching over to the backup power, ore fire suppression.

    I am also far from an expert, but I would imagine $10,000 for switches and routing gear is probably pretty low.
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  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by dollar View Post
    Off the top of my head I don't see anything there about cooling, backup power, UPS for switching over to the backup power, ore fire suppression.
    That's part of the $10,000 for the improvements to the office, my father is a contractor and I have also worked in the field, so I can get a 20ton AC unit for a pretty decent price, and the ducting is already installed in the office, as for the backup power, believe it or not the property already has a backup generator installed and it is included in the lease.

  4. #4
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    I think about switches and other hardware you have a low budget... you will need to get routers, etc.. this is not cheap as low as $10,000. Also the control of temperature on the room and humidity is very important, electricity provider has to do big changes on installation, batteries or diesel engines to sustent your DC in case of emergency, etc...


    You need to add more numbers there...

    Also an option can be to setup your small datacenter inside a bigger one.. they will give you all this done.. just put your staff, cabinets, routers and switches and forget all the security measures.

  5. #5
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    So how long will you take to make a profit? Who are you going to host? What's your marketing plan?
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  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by sinohosting View Post
    So how long will you take to make a profit? Who are you going to host? What's your marketing plan?
    If you are interested in a detailed business plan / marketing plan, feel free to email me and I will send it your way, would rather not post it on the forums


    And you are right, I will have to do more research as for the prices of hardware.

  7. #7
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    I assumed the $10k for the improvements was to cover all the cabling, raised floor (or dropped ceiling, whatever folks are doing these days) etc...

    I would take a look into that backup generator that's included as I wouldn't be too sure that it could handle a datacenter's requirements should power go out. Don't forget the big UPS system to help switch everything over as the generator fires up.

    I would say it would most likely be profitable eventually to build your own facility, but when that will be is hard to say.
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  8. #8
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    Have you any idea how much power is available from the local substation?
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  9. #9
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    $200k? Not a chance, unless it is only for 10-15 racks. I'd say your budget for switches + routers is far too low, your budget for security is too low. There's nothing in there for UPS, aircon, fire suppression, electrical works. Standard office aircon ducting isn't going to cut it in a DC environment.
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  10. #10
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    We just built datacenter of our own and it is not cheap. The most expenses will probably be in the power plant. You may want to budget the wiring, breakers, panel, TVSS, MDPE, PDU, conduit, whips etc for at least $300K (not kidding). On top of this, you will need to add budget for your generator and UPS. Also, make sure that you have the proper generator emission level since you're in CA. This is probably what you want to research first as well as the CRAC (Computer Room Air Con.) unit, PDU, all the large and heavy items due to lead time and availability. Some may take months to get.

    The security, surveillance, proximity reader and so on will probably end up minimum about $30K if you want to do it right. Door controls and their accessories are expensive.

    Network gear will definitely cost you more than $10K if you want to do it properly. Check on the line of cards that will support good infrastructure capacity. Replacing it in the middle while you're operational may cost more businesses than installing the right one in the first place. I would not cut corner here.

    It's best for you to work with the fire marshal and building planning before you buy things. Be very patience and detail. If this is your first data center project, I'd highly recommend hiring an engineering company that has done it. Interview some of them and have them bid on the project. Take your time in planning. We've planned this for at least 6 months in advance and yet we still missed a few things here and there (minor things). If you spend more time and resources in planning, you will spend less in fixing later on.

    Hope this helps.
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by dazmanultra View Post
    Have you any idea how much power is available from the local substation?
    I am going to ask this too. The cost for cooling will easily kill you if you don't count it to your monthly fee

  12. #12
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    I have no experience but interview people first. That's what I'm doing.

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  13. #13
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    From a business standpoint, you should plan 12-24 months of funding without any revenue. A few months is just careless.



    Regards,

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  15. #15
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    SwivelHost:

    Please accept my comments in the spirit that they are intended.

    1. If you are only "thinking of" then there is a good chance that you don't have the capital to kick-start this
    venture.

    2. If you are planning to raise this money by getting loans then most of the answers to your questions will come when you start the business
    planning process.

    3. If you "researched" the competition then you should have also researched the costs of providing the service. Which would have made it
    unnecessary to post in a forum asking for advice or second opinions about things for which you should have the answers to. (While I know that people like
    to answer these types of posts most of the answers are going to be irrelevant to your individual situation.)

    4. Building a data center is more than just about the nuts-and-bolts. There has to be some "purpose" or "reason" that the cost of building is justified vs.
    buying space in an existing facility. This is the recommended course of action and will only cost you a fraction of the cost to accomplish the same end result.

    5. Most people that have the money or who are serious about doing this, just do it. They don't waste time asking people for advise (opinions) which may be irrelevant.

    6. If I've learned anything from years of technical consulting it is that technical problems are easy to solve. It's the non-technical aspects of a project "politics" that will determine ultimate
    success or failure.

    7. Therefore, if you have 200K to spend and your primary objective is to make money (which is the reason most of us go into business) then you can save yourself a lot of trouble and lost money buy simply investing that 200K in to CDs and you
    will make 8K or more per year with virtually no risk of losing the money you invested.


    Hope this helps.

  16. #16
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    How big is the warehouse?
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  17. #17
    How large is the space? You can plan on ~$500/sq ft to build out a datacenter with proper cooling, fire suppression, environmental monitoring, redundant power, and security. For example, a 5000 sq. ft. warehouse space would probably cost in the range of 2.5MM to build out. That's just for the space. Once you have that, THEN you can add on for network equipment, transit, transport, colo fees wherever you're going to pick up your providers, power, servers, staff, insurance, maintenance on the entire infrastructure, etc etc etc etc.

    For a basic facility like described above, you'll probably spend 100k+/mo in operating costs. You then need 12-24 months revenue when starting out to reach your breakeven, so that's another 2+MM you need before you start.

    Unless you have access to a really nice banker or a rich uncle, I wouldn't suggest even THINKING about starting your own datacenter. If you are only starting with a few servers, then why not just rent some space in a colo facility and wait until you have 50-100 cabs full of revenue-generating customers before you jump to a project like this?
    Derek Raines
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  18. #18
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    Wow... So many reasons why it can't be done. I always love how people who don't operate data centers and have never built one think thier experts.

    If the building is there and it has a generator already (assuming the building is sound and the generator works) then you have a good start.

    There are many many many ways that it can be done. I could write a book on how you CAN do it. While I think some of your numbers are low, others I see are high. You need more research and might need to hire a consultant... one with real DC building experience.
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  19. #19
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    Agreed. Hire a consultant and go ahead.

  20. #20
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    Also what is the kWh rate in Irvine, CA?
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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by SwivelHost View Post
    That's part of the $10,000 for the improvements to the office, my father is a contractor and I have also worked in the field, so I can get a 20ton AC unit for a pretty decent price, and the ducting is already installed in the office, as for the backup power, believe it or not the property already has a backup generator installed and it is included in the lease.
    How about a UPS though? You're not going to want the dirty power from a generator going right into the servers... Also, what about overall power capacity? Most buildings don't have the capacity from the utility to power a full data center, same with the size of the generator. You may be fine now, but what are the long-term plans?

    Also, something small, but a major potential issue, is the roof. The roof will be able to support all the chillers you'll end up needing for a full DC? As any water in the DC would be bad, you're certain the roof is completely protected against leaks?

    Overall, I have a very strong feeling you'll run into more than $10,000 to get the facility "up-to-code" unless your plan is only to support the 15-20 servers. Here in Chicago, I know just installing the outlets for the 20 cabinets you list would cost significantly more than $10,000. Then add in UPS, transfer switches, CRAC, chiller, fire supression, etc., etc.
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  22. #22
    Other than your startup costs, which are incredibly low, you have not discussed as your offering differentiator. This is a mature market segment with a wide variety of offerings and thus there may be certain basic assumptions by prospective customers from day one.

    Do you currently have a sufficient customer base from which you can provide references to prospects ?

    What is your succession planning ? What happens if there is an urgent facilities , network or personnel problem to be fixed and you have a serious illness or called out on jury duty or cannot attend to the problem for whatever reason (life happens) ?

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spudstr View Post
    Good luck getting a generator, from what I hear they are on backorder for a year or so. Unless your a big name like dupont Fabros etc.

    200k wont even cover the cost for the generator + installation + transfer switches.
    There's actually a substantial used market for generators, and since they'er used for backup and tend to be maintained under service contract they're not a super risky thing to buy used.

    I used to know a broker who specialized in this...Might be able to dig up his phone number if anyone's seriously interested.

    Switching gear's much harder to handle used because it tends to be more custom per site.
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  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by WII-Aaron View Post
    Wow... So many reasons why it can't be done. I always love how people who don't operate data centers and have never built one think thier experts.

    If the building is there and it has a generator already (assuming the building is sound and the generator works) then you have a good start.

    There are many many many ways that it can be done. I could write a book on how you CAN do it. While I think some of your numbers are low, others I see are high. You need more research and might need to hire a consultant... one with real DC building experience.
    Amen to this.
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  25. #25
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    this is a horrible time to do it.

    used equipment is dried up and expensive as a result

    new equipment is on shortage still from orders that have been on currently building datacenters

    raw materials prices are through the roof

    power and gas is going up

    economy is slowing.

    these are all parts of the recipe for a disaster

    if you are not already done or simply adding to an existing facility to meet a signed contract for a very good client - dont start now.

    wait till next year to see how things are - probably will be used equipment available from the orders that dont get paid for this year because of downturns and prices will moderate as well.

    keep your powder dry for a bit.
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  26. #26
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    Put simply, your budget is way out of whack. Typical costs to build out data center space are several hundred dollars per square foot.
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  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Suds View Post
    Put simply, your budget is way out of whack. Typical costs to build out data center space are several hundred dollars per square foot.
    very true also - and that is if you really manage the buildout well. I know people who have 800 in them.......
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  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by SwivelHost View Post
    I am thinking of starting a new data center in Irvine, CA. Now before you guy's go bashing, I am not thinking of starting something with 4-5 racks for my hosting company in the closet in a 400 sqft office, I am thinking of starting a full blown data center. Heres the cost's I've factored in already, what I am looking for is people to let me know if a) They think that there is a market for this (I have done research, most data centers in Orange County are over priced, I plan on offering the services at an affordable rate.)

    What's needed:
    Warehouse/Office Space(all in one): $4,000 monthly
    2x 1GBPS connection's: $46,000 Monthly (Yes this is not much for a data center, but we figure we should use what we can afford before trying to get more, no sense paying for 2x10gbps connections if you don't need them yet!)
    Racks: $1,000 each
    Improvements to the Office/Warehouse: $10,000 (I'm also a contractor so I can cut cost's that way)
    Dedicated Servers: $1000-3,500 each(Yes, I plan on offering dedicated servers as well.)
    Switches, and other hardware: $10,000
    Security: $5,000 (installing a camera system, bigger locks with fingerprint access, plexy glass windows, etc.)
    Other Office Equipment: $10,000 (computer's, phone system, etc.)
    Total Startup Fee: $65,000x20%=78,000(this includes 20 full lockable racks, 15-20 servers with backup parts on hand, and 20% extra for any extra things that come up.
    Total monthly cost:$51,000 + Staff salary's (I plan on having a small staff at first, 1 tech per shift.)

    Total Startup funds: $200,000. (running cost's for the first few months included + extra money to get more racks etc. as we get more customers)

    What do you think? Is there anything major I left out here? I plan on hiring a network engineer to help me set everything up.

    Also, do you think that something like this would even be profitable in the long run? I mean that is the reason we go into business isn't it?

    Just looking for your $0.02..
    A few things I would change: find less expensive space without windows. You should not be paying that much monthly off the bat. Start smaller than you aare... maybe 10-15 racks. Find a warehouse building that has multiple tenants and two sections that are right next to each other. Ask the landlord to put new tenants in other areas besides the one next to yours and if they are unwilling, offer to put a hold fee down. Your network infrastructure will cost significantly more; again, start small. You can always move most of the equipment in use to internal networking once you expand and replace it.

  29. #29
    Best of luck with it Swivelhost.

    Not wanting to hijack your post but I'm currently evaluating a building for a possible colocation/data center set up. The company I work for has purchased a huge building on the East Coast for possible redevelopment of office space or a data center/colocation facility.

    I'm doing a report for management going over the pros and cons of redevloping a site like this and here are some of my thoughts/observations which I would appreciate ANYBODYS input.

    The building would likely handle over (from a layout perspective) 10,000 42U racks which could be in a combination of cages, rows and water chilled racks.

    My thoughts from a business plan point of view would be to start as both a Colocation and data center facility with sections ranging from Tier 1 - 4.

    Obviously from a colocation point of view their would not be much needed to change the building. To be a Data Center would not really require much via building changes but obviously alot with regards to hardware and skill set. Seen as its not really a facility worth putting anything less than 1,000+ racks it becomes a massive project requiring and an even larger budget.

    I troll the Internet and look at everything from racks from $1000 through to the IBM eXchange Heat water cooling racks at $4,500 and look at 1U and 2U servers both NEW and USED ( ANY VIEWS ON PURCHASING USED SERVERS UNDER WARRANTY FROM HP OR IBM) and see that a rack full of 42 x 1U servers including the rack will cost between $42,000 and $90,000 per rack. So 1,000 racks full of gear would range between $40m and $90m for new gear and between $20m and $40m for used.

    A colocation on the other hand would probably be about $2m in cages and $2m in racks plus roughly another $2m in networking, etc.

    Revenue and expense projections I can do, but anyones views on the market needs and industry directions would be appreciated. I see alot of finace firms have delayed building/upgrading there own DC as a result of subprime losses. Is this an opportunity?

    Appreciate your time and thoughts!


    Here are the building specs:

    The building is over 500,000 square feet
    with 250,000 sqf raised flooring.
    2 stories.

    Here are the power specs:

    Served by two (2) 115KV transmissions lines
    Electrical distribution system is rated 50 Megawatts first contigency.
    25 electrical substations/25,000 KVA capacity (Back up generator)


    Cooling capacity:
    10,500-ton chilled water capacity

    Telecommunications:

    Both fiber optic and copper
    10 T-3 lines on Fiber, 75 T-1 lines on Fiber, 100 T-1 lines on Copper, 6000 POTS lines

    Fiber is lit at OC-192 (10 Gig) and OC-48 (2.4gig).

  30. #30
    Never underestimate the need of proper cooling. That is something you'll certainly have to investigate.

  31. #31
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    200k is rather optimistic. We just extended our DC with a suite of 52 racks in 2,500 sq. ft.

    Bear in mind the generators, substations, MV switch plant and networking were all already in place, all we needed was raised floor, cooling, power distribution and local networking.

    We spent €1.1M (roughly US$1.65M)
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  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by optimaview View Post
    Best of luck with it Swivelhost.

    Not wanting to hijack your post but I'm currently evaluating a building for a possible colocation/data center set up. The company I work for has purchased a huge building on the East Coast for possible redevelopment of office space or a data center/colocation facility.

    I'm doing a report for management going over the pros and cons of redevloping a site like this and here are some of my thoughts/observations which I would appreciate ANYBODYS input.

    The building would likely handle over (from a layout perspective) 10,000 42U racks which could be in a combination of cages, rows and water chilled racks.

    My thoughts from a business plan point of view would be to start as both a Colocation and data center facility with sections ranging from Tier 1 - 4.

    Obviously from a colocation point of view their would not be much needed to change the building. To be a Data Center would not really require much via building changes but obviously alot with regards to hardware and skill set. Seen as its not really a facility worth putting anything less than 1,000+ racks it becomes a massive project requiring and an even larger budget.

    I troll the Internet and look at everything from racks from $1000 through to the IBM eXchange Heat water cooling racks at $4,500 and look at 1U and 2U servers both NEW and USED ( ANY VIEWS ON PURCHASING USED SERVERS UNDER WARRANTY FROM HP OR IBM) and see that a rack full of 42 x 1U servers including the rack will cost between $42,000 and $90,000 per rack. So 1,000 racks full of gear would range between $40m and $90m for new gear and between $20m and $40m for used.

    A colocation on the other hand would probably be about $2m in cages and $2m in racks plus roughly another $2m in networking, etc.

    Revenue and expense projections I can do, but anyones views on the market needs and industry directions would be appreciated. I see alot of finace firms have delayed building/upgrading there own DC as a result of subprime losses. Is this an opportunity?

    Appreciate your time and thoughts!


    Here are the building specs:

    The building is over 500,000 square feet
    with 250,000 sqf raised flooring.
    2 stories.

    Here are the power specs:

    Served by two (2) 115KV transmissions lines
    Electrical distribution system is rated 50 Megawatts first contigency.
    25 electrical substations/25,000 KVA capacity (Back up generator)


    Cooling capacity:
    10,500-ton chilled water capacity

    Telecommunications:

    Both fiber optic and copper
    10 T-3 lines on Fiber, 75 T-1 lines on Fiber, 100 T-1 lines on Copper, 6000 POTS lines

    Fiber is lit at OC-192 (10 Gig) and OC-48 (2.4gig).
    There are a lot of factors that you're kicking around here, and you could have something going. Things to think about are that outside of NYC/Boston, owning the physical building is a small part of the total cost of building a data center. In many cities there's a lot of excess warehouse space, so that's not really where the barrier to entry is.

    Consider where your company's core competencies are, and if they're outside of the managed services/IT sectors, you may be better off with an acquisition. I don't have any nonpublic information in this respect, but with the economic uncertainties lately I expect that there are probably some complete datacenters or data-based companies that would seriously consider a merger.

    Just for the feasibility decision you should consider hiring a consultant who has serious knowledge in this area. It wouldn't be at all unreasonable to spend in the $10K range to get some talent in who can answer your questions about what is feasible and what isn't. Also, don't be afraid to contact vendors or have a technical person contact them on your behalf. Ask them what sorts of discounts you can expect on the scales of purchase you're talking about, and what things you may be missing. They need to develop relationships early, so talking to you is definitely in their interest. Just be honest that it's still in a feasibility study phase and find out who is helpful soon.

    Things to consider at this scale of data center:

    Cooling. Keep in mind redundancy and airflow in the building, not just total capacity.

    Power/UPS/power quality. Keep in mind that depending upon what city you're in, your actual power capacity may be much lower than the size of your feed, because switching power supplies are notoriously tough on power quality. Chicago and Buffalo tend to have good power (Chicago because of the nuclear facilities in the downstate, and Buffalo because of Niagara Falls, and because both have experienced slower more measured growth than other places).

    Get a power quality consultant into the building as soon as you can. If you develop the building as a datacenter, the information will be critical, and if you develop it as an office it'll still end up quite useful. Remember that total megawatts is just scratching the surface when you're looking at electical consumption at this scale.

    (An aside, but I tend to think that Buffalo is way under-built when it comes to IT infrastrucure. It has reasonably inexpensive bandwidth, cheap power, a lower than average cost of living, and yet there's very little datacenter activity there.)

    Also, if you go going with standardized hardware (as opposed to customer-supplied hardware) have a look at DC power. It's still emerging in the IT industries, but you gain cooling, efficiency, and power quality benefits. See this eweek article for a summary.

    You'll need to do your own cost accounting to decide, but I would go with standard rather than water-cooled racks, and instead look at your power density. The water cooled racks are generally designed for when you need to add extra density to a datacenter already at full capacity.

    Raised floors or not raised floors? I won't go over the arguments because it gets kinda religious, but investigate both options.

    Wiring. Somehow the larger the datacenter the more expensive it is per rack, not the other way around.

    Engineering/Support Infrastructure. At this size of a facility, the choices you make with regards to the workflow of your support, provisioning, engineering, etc. will have a huge impact on your total success. Make sure a lot of thought goes into it. What level of support do you plan to provide to your customers? Is consulting going to be a value added service for you? There's a huge gradient here between service providers.

    Dedicated servers: Don't look at the cost of populating the entire facility with 1U servers unless you have customers solidly lined up before buildout. Instead, build out the infrastructure ahead of time, and develop a relationship with vendor(s) for just-in-time delivery of server hardware. This way you're not sitting on depreciating hardware. Network hardware and physical infrastructure tend to depreciate at a much slower rate than server hardware, and network hardware takes longer to provision. So, have the router ports, a documented standard procedeure, and populate each rack one at a time. Probably the same goes for edge switches.

    Out of band management: I have a serial console and a remote power switch on every piece of hardware I use. I'd suggest you do the same, as the cost isn't that high, and it can save a lot of staff time. If you design the authentication schemes correctly so your customers have access this can also be an extra selling point.

    Virtualization, blades, and centralized storage. Beyond the scope of a small post, but plan for these.

    Bandwidth: At this scale of usage, seriously consider local transit to the telco hotel in whatever city you're in. This way you can negotiate your bandwidth with many providers rather than whomever happened to run fiber to your building. Also, this allows you to support connections to customer's private Metro-Area-Networks, a must for banking and biotech customers who don't trust the public internet.

    Hope I gave you some things to think about. Sounds like a really interesting project and feel free to PM with more questions.

    Regards,
    Erek Dyskant
    Last edited by dysk; 02-23-2008 at 12:29 PM. Reason: Added out-of-band management piece.
    System administration, application development, and project management.
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  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by optimaview View Post
    The building would likely handle over (from a layout perspective) 10,000 42U racks which could be in a combination of cages, rows and water chilled racks.
    From a structural perspective does the building support the combined weight of 10,000 racks fully loaded, UPS gear, battery cabinets, etc? Did you consider the problem of moving heavy equipment into and out? Was the building purpose-built to be a datacenter with a substantially reinforced floor?

  34. #34
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    First of all, i reply without knowledge of the US market and pricing at all, please bear in mind that all figures i give are in EURO and dimensions are in meters (not ft) power useage is in KW but our voltages are 400 and 230 volts as opposed to 110 volt in USA.
    My first language is not English, so please excuse me formy many spelling mistakes.


    We finished some smaller rooms of 40 to 150m2 each with a density of 3KW per m2 and now move to a bigger challenge of building a 500 m2 space with expansion options to 2200 m2 with a power and cooling density of 4KW per m2

    We use the raised floor / cold corridor principal before, where we secured the cold aisle completely from the hot aisles with separate doors and dividers. We use a VESDA sysem for smoke detection and Argonite for fire suppresion.

    Using Argonite presents its own unique challenges, the VESDA system is linked to the building management system (you need this in a DC as well) that turns off the airconditioners if smoke is detected. Then if there is no manual override, the argonite will spread trough the room within 30 seconds after smoke detection suppressing the fire.

    - Some things you did not consider in your start topic is an Argonite system and VESDA (or anything similar) that will cost you about 50 000 euro per 100 m2
    - Another issue you did not tackle was the building management system / software. This can cost you a pretty penny...

    Because of the fire suppression system, we had to make adjustments to the 'false walls' of the room, since the pressure could actually blow them out of their sockets. Also we had to make sure that all the 'false walls' where fire delaying themself, this added to the cost of putting them in. We also installed a secure metal grid between the false walls to keep intruders out of the room (else they would saw a hole in the wall and they are in the Data room).

    - You did not tell us how big your space is, but i doubt $10000 would be enough to even cover the security of walls, fire delaying walls and walls strong enough to withstand the fire suppression gas pressure.

    Raised floor was fairly inexpensive, about 12000 euro / 100 m2 including installation. Make sure that all cabling, wiring, cable trays, cooling piping etc are done before the floor is put in, since if you have to remove a lot of tiles later, you have to let the people straighten the floor again for you (balance it out), this adds to the cost.

    If you have a concrete floor below your raised floor, i advise to let them put a coating to prevent concrete dust to come away from the floor into the airstream later.

    Racks / cabinets are available on the used market in Europe in large quantities and should not cost you more then 300 euro (60x100cm) or 200 euro (60x80cm) each.

    For the power system, we used in the smaller rooms a modular setup much like this system http://www.enextro.com/ we are investiagting now if it would be more cost effective to use this in the bigger sized rooms or if it would be better to put in all cabling and power outlets (PDU) in one go.

    Increasing the power to the building was not neccesary, so i skip this part here. This can however be extremely expensive (easy into the xx xxx euro) if the power capacity is not adequate in the building. You will want to have at least 2 independant powerfeeds to the building.

    I will not cover the main powerplant (internal) UPS and Generator here but your budget seems to be not adequate for it. we used about 500 euro per KW capacity in this traject. for a 100m2 room with 3KW density per m2 this figures roughly to 150 000 euro

    Last item i will cover (this will not cover all issues, like perimeter defense, security, storage rooms, cages, ducting, etc etc) is your local loop. The decision to use 2 x 1 gigabit is unwise. We put three ducts of darkfiber in the ground, in this way we are flexible with speeds later. Each fiber can support 1 gigabit, 10 gigabit or even multiple 10 gigabit speeds with DWDM equiptment and is future-proof for us. We simply run the DF to existing carrier neutral DCs to pickup connectivity to the various carriers.

    I am sure i forgot a lot of issues, but here my most important tip: don't do it yourself, hire someone with experience as a consultant to take this project on, it will safe you a lot of headaches later.
    Last edited by swiftnoc; 02-24-2008 at 07:00 AM.
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  35. #35
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    We are actually getting ready to build a new DC and have been working with some very new technologies that eliminate the need for UPS systems and traditional generators and save over 60% of the electrical costs.

    Sometimes you just need to think outside the box.
    Aaron Wendel
    Wholesale Internet, Inc. - http://www.wholesaleinternet.net
    Kansas City Internet eXchange - http://www.kcix.net

  36. #36
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    Do you mean backup power based on a 'flyweel' some kind of gyroscope ? if so, this is not good a good traditional UPS replacement (experience) if you are not refering to this technique, please share the information with us on WHT
    Last edited by swiftnoc; 02-24-2008 at 08:24 PM.
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  37. #37
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    They have an array of hamsterwheels on an inverter. When power from the grid goes down, they throw in more cheese to increase output.

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iwannasite View Post
    They have an array of hamsterwheels on an inverter. When power from the grid goes down, they throw in more cheese to increase output.
    Haha. Nice.

  39. #39
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    Have you guys seen the ad for the energizer bunny lately? I'd like to know which city that uses it, seems pretty powerful if it can power up the entire city block.

    I've been reading on the generator alternative, but not sure what's out there that has passed the test of time, or suitable for datacenter applications. But then again, my knowledge is very limited so I'm all ears.
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  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iwannasite View Post
    They have an array of hamsterwheels on an inverter. When power from the grid goes down, they throw in more cheese to increase output.
    IME switching from peanuts to a mix of sunflower and pumpkin seeds gets you an extra 30% power
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