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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Posts
    1,376

    3 GHz P4 at 2.4 GHz?

    Code:
    $ cat /proc/cpuinfo
    processor       : 0
    vendor_id       : GenuineIntel
    cpu family      : 15
    model           : 6
    model name      : Intel(R) Pentium(R) D CPU 3.00GHz
    stepping        : 5
    cpu MHz         : 2400.000
     -- snip --
    
    processor       : 1
    vendor_id       : GenuineIntel
    cpu family      : 15
    model           : 6
    model name      : Intel(R) Pentium(R) D CPU 3.00GHz
    stepping        : 5
    cpu MHz         : 2400.000
     -- snip --
    So the processor (dual-core Pentium) identifies itself as being 3 GHz, but they're running at 2.4 GHz. What gives?

    This machine is a fresh new dedicated server in a major data center, BTW. I'm assuming they're configured this way in the BIOS? I just want to rule out any obvious configuration errors on my end before I go opening trouble tickets.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Austin, Texas
    Posts
    272
    With a locked multiplier that would be an FSB of 160, which is doubtful... May be a multiplier issue, which would be a multiplier of 12 instead of 15. I'd put in a support ticket and have them look into it for you. Should be a simple fix.

    Edit: some BIOS's have settings to throttle the CPU speed depending on demand for it. You might try applying a load to the processor and rechecking.

    "Speedstep:"
    http://www.intel.com/cd/channel/rese...ture/index.htm
    Last edited by hermetek; 02-16-2008 at 09:52 PM.
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Melbourne, AU
    Posts
    539
    Might it be speedstep at work? (am unfamiliar with Pentium Ds, but the Core series have it)
    WK Woon
    CTO | http://www.aflexi.net - A flexible Network
    Building the next generation CDN platform - DEMO .... coming soon

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Austin, Texas
    Posts
    272
    I checked the specsheet at Intel's website and they do infact use Speedstep.
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  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Posts
    1,376
    Quote Originally Posted by hermetek View Post
    I checked the specsheet at Intel's website and they do infact use Speedstep.
    Does it make sense to disable this in the BIOS, or does it not make any difference?

    And does the fact that this will house virtual machines change the answer?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Austin, Texas
    Posts
    272
    No reason to disable, it's a great thing The power is there when you need it, and when you don't, it's letting your system run cooler and save electricity.
    ██ HermeTek Network Solutions
    ██ Network design, security, and implementation
    ██ BSD & Linux consulting, training, and hosting
    ██ https://www.hermetek.com | 1.866.235.1288

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    2,574
    Quote Originally Posted by hermetek View Post
    I checked the specsheet at Intel's website and they do infact use Speedstep.
    As a side note, the old Intel Xeon may lower the processor clock in case of high temperature until a threshold when it then shuts down the system to protect the hardware.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Montreal, QC
    Posts
    18
    Hi,

    Are you running cpuspeed? ps auxw|grep cpuspeed .... If so, this will scale back your processor speed to save energy or protect from a thermal situation, man cpuspeed

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