Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 40 of 57
  1. #1

    100mbits in ur living room

    Strange kinda question.
    But if these data centres have all this speed,why cant you have it in ur home.
    In the uk would there be anyway to have a 100mbt line to your house.
    Smthing like a leased line,or is this just impossible???

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Pittsburgh
    Posts
    3,479
    There are some countries when you can get insane speeds to the house. Maybe Sweden and Japan? Don't quote me on that, as I can't recall what places exactly, but I do know there are some countries where very high-speed lines are abundant.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    2,780

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    285
    The problem in the US is the "last mile". The US is so spread apart that it gets extremely expensive to run fiber everywhere. Verizon is cherry picking neighborhoods that can afford Fios for their fiber installs but if you live in the sticks you will not see Fios anytime soon if ever.

    Countries such as Korea, Japan, and parts of Europe everyone lives close together in condos and apartment buildings where it is super easy to run fiber to the building and hook everyone up with ethernet.

  5. #5
    100 mbps in a data center costs $1,500 +/-
    Not too many households willing to pay that.

    What I find amazing is that some above-average income neighborhoods, such as Palo Alto, CA where there is fiber provided by the city - most folk are going with lower cost DSL or Cable.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    2,599
    Look you can get 100mbps to any house whether it is there or not,

    most providers are willing to cable your street to the nearest exchange at your expense. Possible as next door did it with Telstra. Will cost to dependings where the nearest exchange.
    Automated, Secure & Low Cost cPanel Backups (on the cloud)
    For Users & Web Hosting Providers - User Backups

  7. #7
    Look you can get 100mbps to any house whether it is there or not,

    most providers are willing to cable your street to the nearest exchange at your expense. Possible as next door did it with Telstra. Will cost to dependings where the nearest exchange.




    Thanx thats the answer i was looking for!
    So i live in the uk...and it would be possible to do that.
    I rekon were talking some big amounts of money tho.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    2,599
    Quote Originally Posted by slayer2005 View Post




    Thanx thats the answer i was looking for!
    So i live in the uk...and it would be possible to do that.
    I rekon were talking some big amounts of money tho.
    Well your not wrong, you got to consider that the provider has to contract people to build it but like i said distance from the exchange is the big question.

    I would say $20k plus.
    Automated, Secure & Low Cost cPanel Backups (on the cloud)
    For Users & Web Hosting Providers - User Backups

  9. #9
    So would we be talking distance from my telephone exchange or from a datacenter?
    coz im around 700meters as da crows fly.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    2,599
    Quote Originally Posted by slayer2005 View Post
    So would we be talking distance from my telephone exchange or from a datacenter?
    coz im around 700meters as da crows fly.
    Telephone exchange. Just contact your provider and ask for someone in charge of ripping up the ground to give you more information.
    Automated, Secure & Low Cost cPanel Backups (on the cloud)
    For Users & Web Hosting Providers - User Backups

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    352
    Quote Originally Posted by scooby2 View Post
    The problem in the US is the "last mile". The US is so spread apart that it gets extremely expensive to run fiber everywhere. Verizon is cherry picking neighborhoods that can afford Fios for their fiber installs but if you live in the sticks you will not see Fios anytime soon if ever.
    I've recently realized that is one of the most common myths about bandwidth speeds in the USA. Yes, the majority of the country is spread out with miles between major cities, and the majority of their users are not that far apart. However, that shouldn't prevent everyone in the middle of a major metro area (e.g., New York City) from having direct access to 25+Mbit/s connections. (I would assume that the "last mile" would be awfully short in many of those those areas.) I would assume that hundreds of providers (both large and small) interconnect in dozens of places in the NYC metro area.

    Quote Originally Posted by scooby2 View Post
    Countries such as Korea, Japan, and parts of Europe everyone lives close together in condos and apartment buildings where it is super easy to run fiber to the building and hook everyone up with ethernet.
    I think another factor is that in some other countries it is also a completely different mode of thinking. They are willing to spend the money on the infrastructure required to provide that level of service to their customers. Here in the US our providers have an "it's my network and you can't sell services on it" mentality, which completely discourages competition from all but the absolutely largest providers (i.e., Cable vs. RBOC).

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    6,889
    Quote Originally Posted by dexxtreme View Post
    I've recently realized that is one of the most common myths about bandwidth speeds in the USA. Yes, the majority of the country is spread out with miles between major cities, and the majority of their users are not that far apart. However, that shouldn't prevent everyone in the middle of a major metro area (e.g., New York City) from having direct access to 25+Mbit/s connections. (I would assume that the "last mile" would be awfully short in many of those those areas.) I would assume that hundreds of providers (both large and small) interconnect in dozens of places in the NYC metro area.

    I think another factor is that in some other countries it is also a completely different mode of thinking. They are willing to spend the money on the infrastructure required to provide that level of service to their customers. Here in the US our providers have an "it's my network and you can't sell services on it" mentality, which completely discourages competition from all but the absolutely largest providers (i.e., Cable vs. RBOC).
    Optimum Online provides 30 Mbit/sec cable in the NY Metro area and RCN offers 20 Mbit/sec cable and covers much of Chicago, Boston, New York, DC, and Philadelphia.

    The difference you mention is there because the companies in question paid for most of their ore infrastructure themselves. In many other countries, the government pays for most of the infrastructure. This may sound good, but to me, it seems to be a waste of money. If there is sufficient demand, the free market will create the necessary business around it. In the end, the fact is, there is really very little difference between 6 Mbit/sec cable or DSL and 100 Mbit/sec connectivity. What are you going to consistently do at home that uses that much bandwidth? Even then, why make everyone pay for services only being fully utilized by a very small percent of the population?
    Karl Zimmerman - Steadfast: Managed Dedicated Servers and Premium Colocation
    karl @ steadfast.net - Sales/Support: 312-602-2689
    Cloud Hosting, Managed Dedicated Servers, Chicago Colocation, and New Jersey Colocation
    Now Open in New Jersey! - Contact us for New Jersey colocation or dedicated servers

  13. #13
    Some housing projects in the netherlands have 100mbit facilities, but i don't see the benefits of mass using 100mbit lines at home.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    131
    Quote Originally Posted by slayer2005 View Post
    Strange kinda question.
    But if these data centres have all this speed,why cant you have it in ur home.
    In the uk would there be anyway to have a 100mbt line to your house.
    Smthing like a leased line,or is this just impossible???
    Depends where in the UK really. Why don't have 100Mbps to the home now? Ask ofcom and look at BT's history. To get 100Mbps to most places right now... you're looking at laying your own fibre to a POP or renting the infrastructure from an existing provider (primarily BT depending upon your locality).

    Cheap (depending on how you define that) fibre to the doorstep is coming, h2o networks (using the sewer system - h2onetworksdarkfibre.com/fibrecity.eu) and exponential-e seem to be making the most news in the UK recently for their 'budget' options. As for just getting a high speed home connection your best options are Virgin Media (who'll be rolling their 50Mbps cable service soon) or waiting to see what happens with wimax and such.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    New York, USA
    Posts
    466

    FIOS

    Verizon's FIOS is fiber to the house. Currently offers up to 50Mbit/sec. Their system CAN offer 100Mbit/sec+ without issue. It's just a matter of them changing some options to their setup. Outside of FIOS you aren't going to get much faster for consumer bandwidth. Cablevision's Speed Boost, you RARELY get the 30Mbit/sec speed, their service is way oversold.

    Really do you need that type of speed? For today most people 15 Mbit/sec is fine. In many cases the speed (not the connection mind you) isn't even 100mbit.

    The need for IPTV and HD movie downloads will drive the need for higher speeds to home. Until then you will have to wait :-)
    Larry Ludwig
    Empowering Media
    HostCube - Proactively Managed Xen based VPSes
    Empowering Media - The Dev Null Blog

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Israel
    Posts
    376
    While you are talking about 100mbit, there is active testing of GPON (Gigabit Passive Optical Network) going on in Sweden.
    While the technology may not guarantee 1gbit to each resident, it is still quite amazing.
    I imagine with this technology ISPs may offer a guaranteed connection of lets say 50mbit/s but with the ability to burst upto hundreds of mbits or even the full gbit.
    What else would a person need? O right.. need all the servers in the world to be able to send at those speeds to many clients. Time to get those gbit NICs for your servers people

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    1,766
    You should take a look at this...
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/7202396.stm
    -- Adam

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Miami Beach, FL, USA
    Posts
    764
    In some countries in Europe, internet providers are now giving their clients 100mbps lines. Doesn't cost $20k either, more around $60.
    Website Design and Marketing in France
    www.SagaNET.fr

  19. #19
    To get a true 100Mbps to a home there is more involved in terms of infrastructure for the provider than the distance to the home from the CO and and the fiber build to get there. From the DSLAM at the CO to thier Internet gateway they would also need to dedicate 100Mbps throughout the metro network as well which would be incredibly taxing on those resources. A consumer class product relies on gross oversubscription to provide residential customers connectivity. Say you had a neighborhood of just 1000 homes (less than served by many CO's) and offered them all a 100Mbps service and built the network on a 1:1 ratio to gaurantee 100Mbps like a business service.....You would need 10Gbps waves to service that CO. Now say there are 10 CO's going into a IP Breakout for them like an Equinix. (again much less then served today) You would need gear to support 100Gbps. Granted you could engineeer by utilization and don't need anywhere close to a 1:1 ratio for consumers, and no one would build a network like this, providing 100Mbps and( gauranteeing it) would be taxing on other resources and would inherently incur real costs to the consumer outside of the fiber pull.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    6,889
    Quote Originally Posted by empoweri View Post
    Verizon's FIOS is fiber to the house. Currently offers up to 50Mbit/sec. Their system CAN offer 100Mbit/sec+ without issue. It's just a matter of them changing some options to their setup. Outside of FIOS you aren't going to get much faster for consumer bandwidth. Cablevision's Speed Boost, you RARELY get the 30Mbit/sec speed, their service is way oversold.
    So you can always get 50 Mbit/sec over FIOS and you can always get 100 Mbit/sec from those providers in the countries that we're saying provide it? A residential product will always be oversold because as I said, basically no one will notice any difference once they're over 6 Mbit/sec.
    Karl Zimmerman - Steadfast: Managed Dedicated Servers and Premium Colocation
    karl @ steadfast.net - Sales/Support: 312-602-2689
    Cloud Hosting, Managed Dedicated Servers, Chicago Colocation, and New Jersey Colocation
    Now Open in New Jersey! - Contact us for New Jersey colocation or dedicated servers

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    1,078
    I read in a magazine that BT are starting testing there 100mbit connection services with something like 20000 households around the UK, Might be 2000 or 20000 cant remember.

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    New York, USA
    Posts
    466
    Quote Originally Posted by KarlZimmer View Post
    So you can always get 50 Mbit/sec over FIOS and you can always get 100 Mbit/sec from those providers in the countries that we're saying provide it? A residential product will always be oversold because as I said, basically no one will notice any difference once they're over 6 Mbit/sec.
    Yes of course FIOS is oversold, right now not many people have it yet. ;-) I always get my 30mbit/sec download speed from the tests I do.
    Larry Ludwig
    Empowering Media
    HostCube - Proactively Managed Xen based VPSes
    Empowering Media - The Dev Null Blog

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    905
    Quote Originally Posted by slayer2005 View Post
    Strange kinda question.
    But if these data centres have all this speed,why cant you have it in ur home.
    In the uk would there be anyway to have a 100mbt line to your house.
    Smthing like a leased line,or is this just impossible???
    Look into Virgin Media... they're bringing out a 50mbit plan soon

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    2,734
    If you are willing to dig up the road to have it installed then its certainly not impossible!

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    1,766
    Quote Originally Posted by markjut View Post
    If you are willing to dig up the road to have it installed then its certainly not impossible!
    Read this...
    Fibre firm H2O provides super-fast broadband via the sewers
    Quote Originally Posted by Adam H View Post
    You should take a look at this...
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/7202396.stm
    -- Adam

  26. #26
    I will say, I like my DS3 at home... But then again, we have microwave frequencies we can use and a lot of DS3 gear laying around so I just pointed a dish out the window of our Seattle POP towards my home-office and put a dish at home on my deck.

    The best part is really the 1 ms ping, the worst part is having a cisco 7204VXR under my desk.

    One of these days, i am going to swap-out to an OC3 and just put my home servers in our datacenter.


    Location is really everything though (as others have said). I know few people who would pay our data-center rates for home internet as there is just no jusification for putting in a large pipe (capital expense) and then having little usage on it (especailly if it is usage billed).

    john


    John

  27. #27
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Ashburn VA, San Diego CA
    Posts
    4,571
    Quote Originally Posted by empoweri View Post
    Yes of course FIOS is oversold, right now not many people have it yet. ;-) I always get my 30mbit/sec download speed from the tests I do.
    The FiOS network might be less oversold than you think. They are practically REQUIRED to dedicated at least 30Mbits or more to every house just for TV.

    If you noticed, each TV watching an on-demand program is pulling approx. 4Mbits/sec worth of UDP through the internet router. Make that 8Mbps+ for an HD program. With all TV's going, I've seen over 30Mbps/sec of TV traffic riding ON TOP of the 30Mbps worth of downloads i'm pulling to my PC.

    if they planned on overselling the fiber resources or their internal IP network, they'd be in big trouble with everyone's TV picture going out.

    And with the size of the verizon/mci network I doubt they're going to run in to serious peering issues with all the eyeballs.
    Fast Serv Networks, LLC | AS29889 | Fully Managed Cloud, Streaming, Dedicated Servers, Colo by-the-U
    Since 2003 - Ashburn VA + San Diego CA Datacenters

  28. #28
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    New York, USA
    Posts
    466
    Quote Originally Posted by FastServ View Post
    If you noticed, each TV watching an on-demand program is pulling approx. 4Mbits/sec worth of UDP through the internet router. Make that 8Mbps+ for an HD program. With all TV's going, I've seen over 30Mbps/sec of TV traffic riding ON TOP of the 30Mbps worth of downloads i'm pulling to my PC.
    Yes their IPTV stuff is neat, but I thought it was seperate network from your "internet"?
    Larry Ludwig
    Empowering Media
    HostCube - Proactively Managed Xen based VPSes
    Empowering Media - The Dev Null Blog

  29. #29
    In some countries by law you must have a 10mb+ internet connection to most suburban homes, .fl for example, What allot of people dont understand is its not about quantity of bandwidth (Eg how big your pipe is) its about quality. But to answer your question its very possible to get 100mbps into your house aslong as you have the money, And depending on the area you live in, Many factors like where your nearest fiber relay is or LoS issues etc.

  30. #30
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    6,889
    Quote Originally Posted by FastServ View Post
    The FiOS network might be less oversold than you think. They are practically REQUIRED to dedicated at least 30Mbits or more to every house just for TV.

    If you noticed, each TV watching an on-demand program is pulling approx. 4Mbits/sec worth of UDP through the internet router. Make that 8Mbps+ for an HD program. With all TV's going, I've seen over 30Mbps/sec of TV traffic riding ON TOP of the 30Mbps worth of downloads i'm pulling to my PC.

    if they planned on overselling the fiber resources or their internal IP network, they'd be in big trouble with everyone's TV picture going out.

    And with the size of the verizon/mci network I doubt they're going to run in to serious peering issues with all the eyeballs.
    The point where most overselling happens is where it goes from their internal networks to the public Internet. To the best of my knowledge, that is where a vast majority of the bottlenecks occur. I would imagine IPTV services are part of the internal network, not going over the public Internet, so that wouldn't be affected. There is definitely enough capacity in the fiber itself, that isn't the overselling problem.
    Karl Zimmerman - Steadfast: Managed Dedicated Servers and Premium Colocation
    karl @ steadfast.net - Sales/Support: 312-602-2689
    Cloud Hosting, Managed Dedicated Servers, Chicago Colocation, and New Jersey Colocation
    Now Open in New Jersey! - Contact us for New Jersey colocation or dedicated servers

  31. #31
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    905
    Quote Originally Posted by Adam H View Post
    Read this...
    Just 12 years to wait...

  32. #32
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    877
    Quote Originally Posted by slayer2005 View Post
    Strange kinda question.
    But if these data centres have all this speed,why cant you have it in ur home.
    In the uk would there be anyway to have a 100mbt line to your house.
    Smthing like a leased line,or is this just impossible???
    The problem of very high bandwidth to the home is both financial and political.

    Telcos are holding on to their massive copper plant, even though it's an investment that re-paid itself if not many, many times over. The millions of miles of new fiber that would have to be run street-to-street just to begin to dent copper's coverage is many, many years away. FIOS, U-Verse, and the scant FTTx-exclusive providers out there are mostly experiments in demographic cherry-picking (best suburbs, densest urban areas, etc.)--though of course they'll deny that.

    In short, I wouldn't look to the Bells for any significant help in this regard. They will do some FTTx roll-out but even U-Verse is a hybrid fiber/copper build-out. FIOS is the best telco stab at it but it's a tiny percentage of their coverage area.

    I'd probably look at DOCSIS 3.0 on cable long before FTTx will become a widespread reality, if it ever does.

    Personally I think private enterprise will be the best motivator to get FTTx deployed. I'd like to someone come out guns blazing into building the infrastructure and show it can work as a business. Winfirst tried this during the first dot-com bust and their shell remnants became a part of Surewest, who has been very successful with the fiber plant and in fact continues to grow it. They may be the largest FTTx-centric telco out there.

  33. #33
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Tokyo, Japan
    Posts
    333
    I can get that here in Japan.
    Most houses with internet have optical fibers with 100mbit uplink unmetered bandwidth plan. (Based on research..)
    Major players are NTT and KDDI and both of them cost about 70USD-80USD/mo
    Dedicated IPs cost about 10USD-70USD

    I dont have it though
    Yudai Yamagishi

  34. #34
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    1,078
    Quote Originally Posted by YYamagishi View Post
    I can get that here in Japan.
    Most houses with internet have optical fibers with 100mbit uplink unmetered bandwidth plan. (Based on research..)
    Major players are NTT and KDDI and both of them cost about 70USD-80USD/mo
    Dedicated IPs cost about 10USD-70USD

    I dont have it though
    Just $70 for 100MB, Thats really cheap, We have to pay at least $75/37 in the UK for 20MB.

  35. #35
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    London
    Posts
    883

    Pricing

    I'd rather have 10mbit 1:1 than 100mbit 50:1 which is what its most likely to be.

    The ISPs need to sort out their contention ratios and get rid of this "unlimited" fair usage thats capped at sometimes as low at 2GB/month.

    BTW some pricing for you.

    Last time I checked BTNet 4mbit 1:1 was over 10K per year with a 8K install. Exponetial did sent me an offer for 10mbit 1:1 on a 3 year contract for something like 10K per year with no install charges.

    Obviously the more mbits you buy the cheaper it becomes per mbit but you're still looking a minimum spend of about 10K a year for anything remotely fast. Datacentres normally peer with other provides at 100mbit and upwards.

    (update. Some BTNet pricing http://www.dabs.com/Article.aspx?Nav...&ArticleID=586 )
    Last edited by Georgecooldude; 01-27-2008 at 12:53 PM.
    ...loading

  36. #36
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Tokyo, Japan
    Posts
    333
    Quote Originally Posted by Georgecooldude View Post
    I'd rather have 10mbit 1:1 than 100mbit 50:1 which is what its most likely to be.

    The ISPs need to sort out their contention ratios and get rid of this "unlimited" fair usage thats capped at sometimes as low at 2GB/month.

    BTW some pricing for you.

    Last time I checked BTNet 4mbit 1:1 was over 10K per year with a 8K install. Exponetial did sent me an offer for 10mbit 1:1 on a 3 year contract for something like 10K per year with no install charges.

    Obviously the more mbits you buy the cheaper it becomes per mbit but you're still looking a minimum spend of about 10K a year for anything remotely fast. Datacentres normally peer with other provides at 100mbit and upwards.

    (update. Some BTNet pricing http://www.dabs.com/Article.aspx?Nav...&ArticleID=586 )
    actualy it is 100Mbit 1:1
    unmetered as well
    http://www.ntt-west.co.jp/service_gu...t/great13.html
    Yudai Yamagishi

  37. #37
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Ashburn VA, San Diego CA
    Posts
    4,571
    Quote Originally Posted by empoweri View Post
    Yes their IPTV stuff is neat, but I thought it was seperate network from your "internet"?
    On demand and pay-per-view actually runs over the Internet/router, UDP+MMS. The usage does NOT effect your bandwidth cap either. I've seen 30+Mbits TV traffic while still getting advertised internet speeds.

    Regular "live" digital TV channels have their own wavelength.
    Last edited by FastServ; 01-28-2008 at 10:40 AM.
    Fast Serv Networks, LLC | AS29889 | Fully Managed Cloud, Streaming, Dedicated Servers, Colo by-the-U
    Since 2003 - Ashburn VA + San Diego CA Datacenters

  38. #38
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Ashburn VA, San Diego CA
    Posts
    4,571
    Quote Originally Posted by KarlZimmer View Post
    The point where most overselling happens is where it goes from their internal networks to the public Internet. To the best of my knowledge, that is where a vast majority of the bottlenecks occur. I would imagine IPTV services are part of the internal network, not going over the public Internet, so that wouldn't be affected. There is definitely enough capacity in the fiber itself, that isn't the overselling problem.
    Yes, IPTV stays on their network. I suppose only time will tell, but it's been over a year and I still get full advertised speeds to most sites. Verizon has awesome peering, unlike some cable providers. cough...COX...cough...COMCAST....ect
    Last edited by FastServ; 01-28-2008 at 10:42 AM.
    Fast Serv Networks, LLC | AS29889 | Fully Managed Cloud, Streaming, Dedicated Servers, Colo by-the-U
    Since 2003 - Ashburn VA + San Diego CA Datacenters

  39. #39
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Scranton, PA
    Posts
    360
    Hi, here in my state a company does 100MB/100MB internet connection, indeed it cost 145 euros per month but only available to some special areas connected to the state's fiber infraestructure.

    http://www.adamo.es/info.php?menu1=c...net&customer=c

    Pretty nice, but I'm not lucky as I don't live in the specific areas.

    Greetings.
    Need Further Assistance ? Here you go !

  40. #40
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Lynnwood, WA
    Posts
    438
    http://www.pbs.org/cringely/pulpit/2...10_002683.html

    Just read that. Its a little.. sensationalist? But generally correct.

    I hear a lot about the 'last mile' problem. There is no 'last mile' problem. While it is true the US is very geographically spread out, we also have, per square mile, more MONEY. There are countries with lower population density than the US with higher throughput options available to their citizens. Truly, we have no excuse except the greed of our major telecoms.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •