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  1. #1

    Ping/Speed Times

    I am thinking about moving to a new host. What is the best way to determine what my ping times might be for this?
    Gary - Pilot Journey
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  2. #2
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    Windows XP: Start -> Run -> CMD -> Ping ip/hostname -t or Start -> Run -> Ping ip/hostname -t
    Windows Vista: Start -> That white searchbar: CMD -> Ping ip/hostname -t or Start -> That white searchbar: Ping ip/hostname -t

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by GaryPilot View Post
    I am thinking about moving to a new host. What is the best way to determine what my ping times might be for this?
    The response time for a ping is a very bad way to determine network speed/quality. It's rarely ever accurate. The only time it would really matter is when you're trying to host a gameserver. Any ping time from 0ms-100ms, you're not going to see any speed difference between them loading a normal web page.

  4. #4
    Well how do I know what IP to use?
    Gary - Pilot Journey
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  5. #5
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    Well you can request a host for a test ip or just ping their domain like
    ping webhostingtalk.com -n 10
    this would ping this website 10 times. (-t = unlimited, until you press ctrl + C)

  6. #6
    How can I find out then who is fast?

    This is the problem with non-technical / marketing types making a hosting decision
    Gary - Pilot Journey
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  7. #7
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    Well the pingtimes won't show who is fastest, but to who you have the fastest route.

    Like: Pinging your neighbour will give for example 10 ms, pinging someone in the other side of the US (just an example incase you dont live in the US) would give 150ms, but that server with 150ms might make it possible for you to download with 5MBps while your neighbors network only allows 50 kbps.

    Request a speedfile, do a pingtest and see which one is the best (this also depends on what you will use the server for, for filesharing the best upload speed would be better, but for example gaming, the best ping would be the winner.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by GaryPilot View Post
    How can I find out then who is fast?

    This is the problem with non-technical / marketing types making a hosting decision
    You don't.

    Ping is going to tell you the RTT (round-trip time) which is largely based on distance.

  9. #9
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    Better than a ping would be a traceroute. This tells you which upstream the provider uses to get to you.

    Even better yet, would be to go to a public route server, like route-views, and you can see a more comprehensive view of your host's upstreams and peers. Just follow the commands as follows:

    1) start->run->cmd
    2) type: telnet route-views.routeviews.org
    3) type: show ip bgp <host's test ip>

    Look at each line with only one indentation, which should have a list of 3-5 digit numbers. The last number will be the host's network, and the number right before it will be the upstream or peer. Generally, the more upstreams the better. You also want to look for certain numbers like:

    Level3 -> 3356
    Verizon/MCI -> 701
    ATT -> 7018

    These are Tier 1 Networks, and a good network should always have a few of them. On the other hand, you'll want to avoid numbers like:

    Cogent -> 174
    Hurricane Electric -> 6939

    These are cheaper bandwidth providers. Some may argue that they are just as good, but at the very least, you'll know that your host is paying less to use them.
    Last edited by hhw; 01-23-2008 at 11:16 PM. Reason: addendum
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