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  1. #1

    burstable bandwidth??

    What exactly is burstable bandwidth ???

    Thanks

  2. #2

    Post

    brands,

    With burstable bandwidth, there are no bandwidth restrictions to the account; your traffic is 'burstable' beyond what your plan includes. If you exceed your plan for the month, you will be billed at the overage rate per GB. So if someone offers bustable bandwidth, you'll need to find out what the overage charge is.

    Without burstable bandwidth; if your plan includes 2 GB per month, that's all you get... when you reach it, your done until you order a large plan.

    Hope this helps..

    Khamai

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
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    Earth
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    1,258
    brands,

    I'm not a network expert, but I don't agree with Khamai's definition of burstable.

    I believe is a "burstable" vs. "capped" thing. Burstable means that there is no limit (i.e. cap) as to how fast data transfer can occur. The only limits will be the physical limits of the hardware and the network connections themselves.

    For example, for a server that I manage we average 63 KB/second but the system has bursted to well over 800 KB/second.

    I may be all wet, but I'm pretty sure that's what they mean by burst.

    Frank
    Umbra Hosting
    cPanel | Softaculous | CloudLinux | R1Soft | Ksplice
    Web Hosting, Reseller Hosting, VPS, Dedicated Servers, Colocation
    UmbraHosting.com

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Palm Beach, FL
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    1,095
    Originally posted by ffeingol
    I believe is a "burstable" vs. "capped" thing. Burstable means that there is no limit (i.e. cap) as to how fast data transfer can occur. The only limits will be the physical limits of the hardware and the network connections themselves.
    Yes, that is correct. It should also be noted that the amount of burstability is inversely proportional to the amount of utilization of the line at the time.

    That is, if a T1 has a full meg of outgoing traffic at a given point in time, you will not be able to burst past 512kbit/s (roughly of course, a T1 pumping a full 1.54mbit/s isn't going to happen, it's just theoretical).

    Likewise, if the T1 has only 100kbit/s of outgoing traffic at a given point in time, you will be able to burst more than 1024kbit/s.

    For this reason, if you plan on bursting a lot, you'll want servers on lines thick lines. T1s aren't good for bursting when 1/2 used, but DS3+ lines are.
    Alex Llera
    Professional Server Management
    FreeBSD|Linux|HSphere|Cpanel|Plesk

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Posts
    3,729
    It actually can mean both things, depending on who's making the assertion. When a host who offers virtual hosting says burstable bandwidth, it means that your plan is not restricted to the allotted bandwidth of the plan, as Khamai said.

    When a colo or dedicated provider mentions burstable bandwidth, that's where the other definition comes in.

  6. #6
    Hii all,

    Thanks for all the 4 posts...all made by expert host masters...

    Each post gave me more info on what Burstable bandwidth means....!

    Its interesting to know these little things ... meaning a lot...

    Thanks much again for all the neat explaination...


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