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Thread: Linux Vs Unix

  1. #1

    Linux Vs Unix

    Can anyone tell me some of the comparisions between the two? Like which one is bettter and which hosting companies use the most?

  2. #2
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    Basically, Unix is an operating system dating back from the 70's. There were two main derivations, BSD (Berkley) and SysV (AT&T).

    FreeBSD is based off of actual code from BSD. Linux is just a clone of Unix, using lots of GNU tools. RedHat is classified mostly as a SysV clone.

    I think most companies on this forum use Linux (RedHat).

    Mark
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  3. #3
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    I like redhat. I would also rather use a rpm over source.
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  4. #4
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    edit

  5. #5
    Source is _always_ better than RPM. Anything compiled natively will always be more efficient.

  6. #6
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    What do people think of the Lindows and Mandrake systems that Walmart is selling online at http://www.walmart.com ?

    Or, is it better to buy an XP system and just partition the disk and add BSD?

  7. #7
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    Originally posted by jizaymes
    Source is _always_ better than RPM. Anything compiled natively will always be more efficient.
    What if its compiled on the same native platform?

  8. #8
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    Personally, I wouldnt touch it(lindows). You gotta also remember between linux and unix, even though unix has been around longer, linux has been around the block a lot more. Freebsd is more secure not only because people dont work it as much, and its just better
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  9. #9
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    Originally posted by davidb
    Personally, I wouldnt touch it(lindows). You gotta also remember between linux and unix, even though unix has been around longer, linux has been around the block a lot more. Freebsd is more secure not only because people dont work it as much, and its just better
    Thanks, David. I read a review that Lindows was not very good, and just wanted another opinion. I'm still not sure how good the Mandrake Linux is for home use, or how compatible it is with server Linux.

  10. #10
    I have tried Lindows as well as RedHat, Suse, Mandrake, Slackware, and FreeBSD. I would have to say for home use and you want to learn linux (fully) I would suggest Redhat or mandrake since they are good starter versions and have the most documentation. My take on Lindows is for people who want to use Linux but not "learn" how it works. Suse is decent but has a lack of hardware support when compared to mandrake and redhat. I personally love Slackware b/c it skips all the extra packages and gives you only what you need/want and nothing more so you can add what you want. FreeBSD should be learned AFTER linux in my opinion. I have just ventured into the Unix field and it is much easier having linux knowledge going into it.

  11. #11
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    I've personally never been much of a fan of Mandrake. Unless they've changed recently their focus has always been on bleeding edge .0 release software, and everyone knows you don't install anything Linux till .1 or later

    RedHat releases distros with a little more testing so you'll probably gain more stability and less download time upgrading.

    At the other end are things like Debian who don't add anything till it's well tested and covered in dust.

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