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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
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    Two or more T1 lines . . .

    I am sure this seems like a silly question but a semi-newbie person here.

    I have two T1 lines coming in from different providers. Both will be provided with their own Cisco routers. One of the routers will come with two T1 ports but that isn't an issue because I would prefer to have both routers running for redundancy purposes.

    What is the best way to connect this to the one network of servers so the servers use the lines simultaneously, being if one line goes down, there is another backing it up? Or even better, use the line closes to the person connecting?

    Would this same process apply if I added more T1 lines?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
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    You could set-up a core switch (like a cisco 550X or 650X) and then run an Ethernet cable from each border to the switch or even better for higher redundancy, run 2 core routers and run OSPF (or sim) to create a redundant mesh.
    Mike @ Xiolink.com
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    Advanced Managed Microsoft Hosting
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  3. #3
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    Cisco as you can imagine is very costly. Is there an easier way?

  4. #4
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    You can do it with just about any Layer 3 switch; Foundry, Extreme, HP, etc.
    Mike @ Xiolink.com
    http://www.xiolink.com 1-877-4-XIOLINK
    Advanced Managed Microsoft Hosting
    "Your data... always within reach"

  5. #5
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    Mar 2002
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    Linux/BSD

    This can be done in almost any *nix or BSD system too.

  6. #6
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    Jan 2001
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    Can you explain that a bit more? We are using Red Hat 7.3

  7. #7
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    Really, if you are looking for redundancy use a hardware solution. You will thank me
    Mike @ Xiolink.com
    http://www.xiolink.com 1-877-4-XIOLINK
    Advanced Managed Microsoft Hosting
    "Your data... always within reach"

  8. #8
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    Mar 2002
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    Routing is kinda like algebra..other then the basics. I cant really help ya, if my life depended on it i could probably set something up. Search the net...google is your friend.

  9. #9
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    What would be a good hardware solution. In searching, I found something about meshing or BGP, any feedback?

  10. #10
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    Dec 2001
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    Iowa
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    To make use of both your T1 circuits you'll probably need a router capable of running BGP4 and that has enough memory to accept the full BGP routing table. Or if you want to go cheap you can probably do it with a PC running Linux with a couple T1 cards and running gated

  11. #11
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    I think he says that he has the routers connected to each and as long as they have 128 MB RAM, they should be able to handle BGP tables.

    What would be a good hardware solution.
    You can do it with just about any Layer 3 switch; Foundry, Extreme, HP, etc.
    Mike @ Xiolink.com
    http://www.xiolink.com 1-877-4-XIOLINK
    Advanced Managed Microsoft Hosting
    "Your data... always within reach"

  12. #12
    We used our Cisco to bond two T1's into, essentially, a 3mbit connection.
    I thank my Lord for all His wonderful blessings.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
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    use a Cisco 3620 with dual T1 WIC's and 128mb of memory and your set
    Voiding warranties is what I do best.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    California, USA
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    Originally posted by RackMy.com
    Really, if you are looking for redundancy use a hardware solution. You will thank me
    Yes, I would like to bump this post, just in case...do NOT use a Linux-based solution.
    Yes, it *does* work most of the time but when it starts pooping around you're really in trouble. I have seen it with a company who built their own Linux router, and it can get pretty ugly.
    http://www.voilaweb.com - the Social Internet Toolbox.

  15. #15
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    Jan 2001
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    I don't know if this helps but we have two Cisco 2620, each with 2 WIC Cards and two Cisco 2924 XL Enterprise Switches. Ok, I know this is a very simplistic point of view but with the right hardware and setup, you can essentially connect two switches using BGP and the network will act as one?

  16. #16
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    Jan 2001
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    The Cisco 2620 is the router, I believe it has the 128MB, if not, we can upgrade.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
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    If I'm thinking correctly the 2620 won't take more than 64MB of memory, and I highly doubt you'll get it to take the BGP table with that amount.
    Voiding warranties is what I do best.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Iowa
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    Actually, I believe you can fit the current full BGP table in 64megs of RAM. But with the pace that it's growing you'll probably need more fairly quickly. You don't HAVE to accept a full BGP routing table, but you won't be able to route as efficiently between your two T1's if you don't. I guess it would mostly depend on how much usage you actually have on your two T1's, and if you've only got moderate usage then a full routing table probably isn't critical.

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