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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
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    Kuwait
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    Two nameservers on one machine. How?

    Hi,

    I'm still working on my home network.

    I'm want to use my linux box as a local DNS server. I need to give this machine 2 more IP's and let my DNS daemon listen to use both these addresses.

    How can that be done?

    P.S. I'm still undetermined between djbdns and BIND. Any of them will do.

    TIA.

    --Ahmad
    Ahmad Alhashemi
    PHP, Apache, C, Python, Perl, SQL
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    956
    Just have both IPs point to server and register the DNS servers
    This forum officially ****ing sucks

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Palm Beach, FL
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    If you're using djbdns, set up dnscache for the box's local DNS. Set up dnscachex for your network's local DNS. Set up tinydns for your network's external DNS.

    http://cr.yp.to/djbdns.html

    To bind more than one IP to tinydns, you'll need to patch it and recompile it:

    http://www.ohse.de/uwe/patches/djbdns-1.05-multiip.diff
    Alex Llera
    Professional Server Management
    FreeBSD|Linux|HSphere|Cpanel|Plesk

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Canada
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    1,963
    DJBDNS!!

    can setup djbdns ns1 in /etc/ns1
    and ns2 in /etc/ns2


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Kuwait
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    Hi,

    Thank you all for the responces.

    Before I begin, I'm now thinking that I might not need two nameservers. Do I really need two nameservers in my local LAN?
    This is not going to serve any Internet domains.

    TIA
    --Ahmad
    Ahmad Alhashemi
    PHP, Apache, C, Python, Perl, SQL
    18 related BrainBench certificates

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Palm Beach, FL
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    1,095
    Nope, only one. Two nameservers for domains only serve as backups for each other so the domain stays resolveable (?). But having 2 seperate DNS machines, even in a local environment, is always healthy.

    For example, say you have ns1 and ns2 as two seperate machines on your LAN servicing at least one other machine we'll call your workstation. If ns1 goes down for any reason (hd failure, ram failure, whatever), your workstation will still resolve hostnames because of ns2.

    Now if you have both on one machine, that's a little silly. Even having both on one machine for domains is a little silly, but for simple domains where everything is on that machine anyway, it's fine. If you have a domain where www.domain.tld is pointing to 1.2.3.4 and www2.domain.tld is pointing to 4.3.2.1 and the one box that houses both of the domain's nameservers goes down, www AND www2 go down because no one can resolve them to IPs.

    I think I typed too much, but basically all you need is one in a LAN environment. Anything additional is candy. That's all I used to use on my LAN at my old home. When the DNS went down (named, bleh), I couldn't do anything until I fired it up again. Then I found djbdns.
    Alex Llera
    Professional Server Management
    FreeBSD|Linux|HSphere|Cpanel|Plesk

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Kuwait
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    Originally posted by allera
    Nope, only one. Two nameservers for domains only serve as backups for each other so the domain stays resolveable (?). But having 2 seperate DNS machines, even in a local environment, is always healthy.

    For example, say you have ns1 and ns2 as two seperate machines on your LAN servicing at least one other machine we'll call your workstation. If ns1 goes down for any reason (hd failure, ram failure, whatever), your workstation will still resolve hostnames because of ns2.
    Well, the network currently consists of only three machines

    What I was really thinking is that it might be required for something. When doing the Windows XP TCP/IP settings, for example, it gives you two DNS fields. But it is now working perfectly with only one field filled.


    Now if you have both on one machine, that's a little silly. Even having both on one machine for domains is a little silly, but for simple domains where everything is on that machine anyway, it's fine. If you have a domain where www.domain.tld is pointing to 1.2.3.4 and www2.domain.tld is pointing to 4.3.2.1 and the one box that houses both of the domain's nameservers goes down, www AND www2 go down because no one can resolve them to IPs.
    Yeah, I fully agree.
    That is why I think that such requirements by Internic and others must be eliminated, as it is irrelevant to enforcing anything any more.


    I think I typed too much, but basically all you need is one in a LAN environment. Anything additional is candy. That's all I used to use on my LAN at my old home. When the DNS went down (named, bleh), I couldn't do anything until I fired it up again. Then I found djbdns.
    I enjoyed reading it all
    djbdns is really nice, espicially that I don't have to read my "DNS & BIND" book anymore
    Ahmad Alhashemi
    PHP, Apache, C, Python, Perl, SQL
    18 related BrainBench certificates

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Posts
    167
    If your domain is registered on OpenSRS, here's a trick to point different nameservers to single IP , Please don't abuse it , just use it on your own IP.

    Goto opensrs manage domain - > create a new nameserver pointed it to a dummy IP -> change IP back to the IP already pointed by another nameserver -> wait 1-2 days then check result at http://www.internic.net/whois.html select Nameservers.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Kuwait
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    679
    Originally posted by jakis
    If your domain is registered on OpenSRS, here's a trick to point different nameservers to single IP , Please don't abuse it , just use it on your own IP.

    Goto opensrs manage domain - > create a new nameserver pointed it to a dummy IP -> change IP back to the IP already pointed by another nameserver -> wait 1-2 days then check result at http://www.internic.net/whois.html select Nameservers.
    Thanks for the tip jakis
    Ahmad Alhashemi
    PHP, Apache, C, Python, Perl, SQL
    18 related BrainBench certificates

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