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  1. #1

    Question buying rack servers ?

    I'd like to buy a server with like 2-8Gig of ram 2-4 cpus and 2-4 Hd ata or scsi

    I looked at what compaq and ibm offer but it seems to be way overpriced.

    Anyone know a place where you can buy good quality rack servers at reasonable price ?

    (not just the casing since I need it to be well designed and tested)

  2. #2
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    What you want seems to be in the Enterprise class. Most of the time you have to go with the name brand (IBM, HP, Compaq, etc.), since smaller player don't have the experience in designing such system.

    Don't forget, once you get passed 4GB of RAM, you will need a 64bit CPU and OS, Or Intel's Large Address Extension(?), which in that case would also require an OS that can address the extended memory. (Solaris, Custom version of Linux, or Windows 2000 Datacenter edition). This is no longer the case where you can just add the RAM and CPU and expect the same whitebox price. All these options are in the enterprise range, and therefore they do cost you.

    For the kind of specs you are looking at, Sun servers may also be options.

    Also, you may want to consider clustering smaller system instead of one big server. It may also be most cost effective, depending on your application.

    Peter

  3. #3
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    Dells new PowerEdge 2650's are great, but you are limited to 4GB of memory by processor limitations (32 processors can only address 4GB). 1650's are also excellent if you can live with only three SCSI drives.

    <<edit>> ckpeter's explination adds more value than mine
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  4. #4
    Why not build your own servers? It's cheaper.. and as good as brand name..
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  5. #5
    Humm about the 4Gig memory limit
    I guess this is by cpu ?

  6. #6
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    Why not build your own servers? It's cheaper.. and as good as brand name..
    (Unless your post is a sacastic comment...)

    Did you read his post? I doubt you can find the kind of motherboard that support 8GB of RAM with Multi Processors capability easily.

    Not only the hardware are hard to come by, but even the software are not that easy to obtain. Windows 2000 DataCenter only ships OEM, and I don't think its easy supporting a linux kernel that can use LAE easily. And you can't build Sun server, not the last time I checked.

    Peter

  7. #7
    As for building my own I lack the experience and knowledge needed, i don't want it to crash cuz something is heating too much ....

  8. #8
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    Originally posted by hexa
    Humm about the 4Gig memory limit
    I guess this is by cpu ?
    4GB RAM limit is imposed by the 32-bit pointer size used to address memory. 32-bit CPU only allows a maxium of 4GB to be addressed.

    As I mentioned, Intel has a LAE that allow its high-end processor to address more than 4GB of address, but the OS must support it. Not to mention your applications must also support it.

    Peter

  9. #9
    Well I've looked at http://www.interpromicro.com/commerc...=1025833239484
    recently they seem to offer up to 6gig of ram and 2 cpus

    For the os .. i'm not sure really it's the 1st time I consider that kind of memory
    But i'm sure linux could manage and there's offering it preinstalled so.. I guess it can work

  10. #10
    Humm I guess I'll limit myself to 4Gb then
    It should be enought anyways

    Thx for the info peter

  11. #11
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    Is there any reason why you want to use up to 8GB of RAM?

    Most servers uses 512MB to 2Gb of RAM, and they work well.

    Only really high-end application like oracle database hosting would require that amount of RAM.

    Peter

  12. #12
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    I would also recommend Dell Servers, they are inexpensive and you do get a lot for your money.
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  13. #13
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    Hmm, One word Xeon P4. Put 2 in a server and they run like 4, Put 4 in a server run like 8. Microsoft Adv. server would work fine here as well but Redhat or some thing else might be better.. Also intel has a Xeon board that supports 6GB or 8GB we have there 2 CPU version with 4GB running here and works great.. This you can build your self will cost around 10k for a nice setup..
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  14. #14
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    BTW here is the ones i am talking about http://intel.com/products/server/pro...roc_xeon512kb&

    Look for the Hyper-Threading Technology & Intel® NetBurst™ microarchitecture


    Add: Here is the board we used as well just looked and it will support 12GB so this would work great. http://program.intel.com/shared/prod...shg2/index.htm
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  15. #15
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    Sounds like you have hyperthreading enabled.

    Can you tell me if the hyperthreading option really *appears* as two CPU(to the OS and Apps)? Or is it just some execution parallelism? (I have not been rich enough to afford a Xeon...)

    Peter

  16. #16
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    Yep

    Even when you do Ctrl + Alt + Del you see 4 CPUs not 2 even if there is 2 in there and it uses them all as well.. Seems to work good so far.. We have 2 of these set for our self and seem to be doing good... I like them..
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  17. #17
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    That's strange, I'm gonna have to do some reading to figure out how their addressing this extra memory. Are they segmenting it like they did in the 16 bit 8086 days?

    Technically, Intel Processors only have 32 bit addresses (2^32 ~= 4billion), so how do they address this extra memory? Is there some new latch you can set to bring another 4GB chunk into focus briefly? Ohh, been too long since I've done any real assembly coding, now I have to get up to speed with whatever it is Intel is doing.

    Until today I was blissfully happy with my knowledge that 4GB was the max, and now you have to go ruin that! Gee, thanks.

    << added >>
    And to add insult to injury, Dell's PE 7150's support 12 GB of RAM too! Oh bother.
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  18. #18
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    From what I know, there are new API calls in Windows that allows you to address these extended memory range. Furthermore, the application and the OS must be compiled to use it. There are new pointers and memory allocation functions.

    Which is why I mentioned that if your application doesn't have large memory support, they can't use more than 4GB(even if the OS can).

    Anything going over 4GB will require a large memory version that uses long pointers. In fact, if I remember correctly, these pointers are the same as those used in 64-bit Itinuinm (at least in Windows programming), so porting between 64-bit Windows and 32-bin large memory would be easy. Only real high end application such as Oracle databse have the large memory support.

    Peter

  19. #19
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    I have a IBM Netfinity 7000 M10 that can take 16 Gigs of ram and 4 Xeon Cpus

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