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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
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    Just got a call from the CitiBank Fraud department...

    Apparently someone is using my Visa card in California at gas stations and nail salons... the same one I have in my back pocket currently. Citibank said I would not be responsible for any of the charges so thats good but how does someone get a copy of my physical credit card and go on a spending spree on the other side of the country?
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
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    143
    Identity theft..
    Someone could have gotten your credit card info.. either online or in person. maybe sold it to the highest bidder.

    At least you caught it before it ruined your credit, that's hell getting fixed.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    I would suggest that you get a copy of your credit report to ensure that the person has not been using your identity for other things as well. There is a wide range of ways this could have happened. As reject mentioned this could have happened either using your credit card online, or someone may have made a carbon copy of your card when using at a store. This sort of stuff happens all the time unfortunatly. Normally you are protected from the liability of such fraud, but it is normally wise to make sure that you report it right away to prevent yourself from being responsible. I have heard of numerous people I know having this happen to them, and often can lead to big headaches, especially if they use your identity for other things as well. The credit report should help, and likely should be checked often. Lots of luck.

  4. #4
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    Its weird though because I have only used this card once before in its life, at a gas station in NY. I have never used it online before. So its still a little crazy that it was this card that was 'stolen'.
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  5. #5
    Well, It's best that you inform the bank to block the card immediately and get them to issue a new card, I think you may need to pay a small fee for it.

    This has happened to me many times when buying online and I have now stopped using my credit card whenever possible.

    I now use Western Union for any online transaction as I believe it's the safest in my opinion. So far I have not encountered any problems for almost a year.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    It is possible that it occurred at the gas station...who knows? I am sure that CityBank will do an investigation into it. Another way thieves can get your information is to go through your trash. It is usually a good idea to shred your important documents & statements if you throw them out just to be on the safe side. Also thieves may pretend to deliver mail to your mailbox, and steal mail that looks like it could contain such personal information.

    Also if the bank was hacked they may have obtained it that way. From what I have read, it happens more often then the banks report unfortunatly. The banks often do not report it for the fact that it would scare people.

    Once these fraudsters have your credit card number, they may be able to make an exact copy of it if they are more sophisticated.
    Last edited by zwolf; 03-05-2007 at 10:46 AM.

  7. #7
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    Nov 2006
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    Something else I just thought of. It may be a good idea to call CityBank to ensure that the call was legitimate. Some fraudsters have been known to trick people into giving personal information on the phone by claiming to be from your bank. Basically telephone phishing. Not saying that is what happened, but may be a good idea to confirm, just to be safe.

  8. #8
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    I now use Western Union for any online transaction as I believe it's the safest in my opinion. So far I have not encountered any problems for almost a year.
    Except that they charge ridiculous fees for everything and, not only that, but last time I tried to send a WU they asked me for my social security number...not just the last 4 digits...THE WHOLE NUMBER!

    I'd stay far away from WU...$25 turned into almost $50 with their fees. Then, they charged me for it and refused to send it through because I wouldn't give them my SSN.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
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    Chicago
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    Quote Originally Posted by zwolf
    Something else I just thought of. It may be a good idea to call CityBank to ensure that the call was legitimate. Some fraudsters have been known to trick people into giving personal information on the phone by claiming to be from your bank. Basically telephone phishing. Not saying that is what happened, but may be a good idea to confirm, just to be safe.
    Unless you can spoof phone numbers like you can spoof email addresses, it was from citibank. I checked their website to make sure the number was valid.
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  10. #10
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    Thats good news. But yes spoofing numbers is very possible these days to be honest.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by CLKeenan
    Unless you can spoof phone numbers like you can spoof email addresses, it was from citibank. I checked their website to make sure the number was valid.
    If they have VOIP controls, yes they can spoof name and number. On the other hand, it's probably not that. Compass Bank called me stating they had blocked numorous charges for $500 to $4000. They knew it wasnt me because I dont "sign" my sig. I draw a certain image instead for added security, and it worked.

    They stated that thieves use generators, when they find one that's good, they program it to a blank plastic. Then they can use it at counters, gas stations, etc. Anywhere that doesnt require you know extra info like online stuff usually does.

  12. #12
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    Feb 2003
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    Albany, New York
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    I didnt read the whole thread....but maybe it was reverse physycology.......

    Myabe it wasnt really Citi and someone just trying to get your info?

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
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    Quote Originally Posted by zwolf
    Something else I just thought of. It may be a good idea to call CityBank to ensure that the call was legitimate. Some fraudsters have been known to trick people into giving personal information on the phone by claiming to be from your bank. Basically telephone phishing. Not saying that is what happened, but may be a good idea to confirm, just to be safe.
    That is very, very true... and people give out info as well. Unless I initiate the call, I won't talk to anyone about my bank...

    CLKeenan, get your credit reports and such... never know how deep this may go... maybe a one-time deal, might be the start of a disaster...
    Windows 8 to Linux: I'm MUCH better than you. Eat my dust!

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
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    Hollywood Proper, CA
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    Quote Originally Posted by CLKeenan
    Its weird though because I have only used this card once before in its life, at a gas station in NY. I have never used it online before. So its still a little crazy that it was this card that was 'stolen'.
    I had the same exact thing happen to me, and it just so happens I used the card in Jamaica/Queens NY on the way to Manhattan from JFK.

    They're able to capture your card info when its swiped, and replicate the magnetic strip. Once they have a dupe of the strip they can slap it on cards they actually made themselves. Believe it or not anyone can buy a machine to print credit cards, and activate magnetic strips.

    These outfits are sophisticated... To ensure its not identity theft you may want to call the 3 major reporting bureaus like Equifax, Transunion, etc.. and place a consumer credit hold/alert on your credit this way no one can open any lines of credit with your info or at the very least must show 2 forms of photo id when attempting to establish a line of credit.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
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    Castle Pines, CO
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    Did they tell you it was a swiped transaction? A friend of mine had his number copied down once at a gas station when he handed the card to the attendant. And the attendant then ran transactions through by keying in the card number.

    You should check out the contactless cards. More merchants are now supporting them, but consumers do not seem to be jumping on board. Most of them do come with a magnetic stripe. If I can remember correctly, these cards cannot be reproduced actually right now which makes them even better for security reasons. I think they also use a different CVV each time on the transaction (came in on the tail end of a conference call) but it seems they were just making that determination.

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