Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    265

    how does cachefly or other CDN work for a db driven site?

    anybody knows how cachefly or similar solution works?

    I have a database driven website, and heard somthing about cachefly could increase the web performance. I also checked its website and still confuse how it works.

    I understand it could inscrease download-based site. however, no idea on how a database-driven website may increase its performance. from my point of view, it could be a kind of distribution of computing. but it seems not like the way I am thinking after checking their website demo.

    anyone knows more about cachefly or similar CDN solution? especially for db driven website. say, Is there anything required for coding? is there main difference from a cluster solution set up by myself? thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    New York, NY
    Posts
    10,574
    Cachefly is only for file hosting. If you upload a PHP file it will not work.

    You can increase website performance by sourcing large images and such from their servers, but from our experience it does not make a significant difference. The only reason you may wish to use their system if if you need to distribute a lot of downloads.

    Akamai has solutions allowing connections to MySQL via their CDN, but it comes at a cost

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    634
    You'd want to look at what are called Edge Side Includes, which allow you dissect your page into cacheable and uncacheable objects or snippets, which cacheable elements having their own configuration like TTL. Unless you are doing something extremely personalized, you can still cache plenty of elements of a dynamic page, and depending on your application you can cache some dynamic content for a period of time as well. Say for example you have an e-commerce site. Your category and product interface is dynamic; it checks the inventory status of your product offering every 15 minutes from an XML feed from your supplier, and it checks your internal product database every hour for price information. You could set those as separate cacheable elements, with a TTL of 15 minutes and 1 hour respectively. And on that page is a "shopping cart" icon that also displays the number of items someone has added to their cart and their name if they've logged in (i.e "Joe's Shopping Cart - 1 item"). You can set that fragment as uncacheable and still push a large portion of your page out to the caching edge.

    I'd disagree with layer0 on most of his points.

    Quote Originally Posted by layer0
    You can increase website performance by sourcing large images and such from their servers, but from our experience it does not make a significant difference. The only reason you may wish to use their system if if you need to distribute a lot of downloads.
    I would say this is highly dependent on your traffic distribution and business model. For e-commerce sites that have a substantial international clientele, I would say a CDN is absolutely worth it. Several studies have shown how page download speeds are a significant influence on conversion rate. I think you will find that almost all the medium to large e-commerce providers use a CDN, and many smaller ones do as well. CDN's used to be something strictly for the big boys, and every since Akamai pretty much put a lock on the high end with their Speedera acquisition that has left plenty of opportunity for companies like CacheFly, PantherExpress, MirrorImage, etc. to targer smaller companies.

    Quote Originally Posted by layer0
    Akamai has solutions allowing connections to MySQL via their CDN, but it comes at a cost
    Not quite; it's a quite a bit more elaborate than that. Akamai has a service called EdgeComputing that lets you deploy J2EE applications to their edge network. They essentially allow you to deploy your application to a series of Java Virtual Machines running IBM's WebSphere at their edge servers. I remember reading that they were doing the same for .NET, but I think they shelved that. For now, it's a Java only service. Though I will agree with layer0 that it's definitely not cheap.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    New York, NY
    Posts
    10,574
    I would say this is highly dependent on your traffic distribution and business model. For e-commerce sites that have a substantial international clientele, I would say a CDN is absolutely worth it. Several studies have shown how page download speeds are a significant influence on conversion rate. I think you will find that almost all the medium to large e-commerce providers use a CDN, and many smaller ones do as well. CDN's used to be something strictly for the big boys, and every since Akamai pretty much put a lock on the high end with their Speedera acquisition that has left plenty of opportunity for companies like CacheFly, PantherExpress, MirrorImage, etc. to targer smaller companies.
    We ran some tests and saw less performance when using Cachefly's CDN to serve images on our site. Cachefly's DNS was very slow for us which is part of the reason for this. It felt like their servers were fairly "loaded" too, there would be some delay in response times, etc. For now, we just use them for downloads and it works fine.

    YMMV.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    634
    Okay, I see now that your comments were directed at CacheFly specifically. I don't have much direct experience with them so I'll take your word that it doesn't perform particularly well for that application. A client very recently did some testing of PantherExpress and found it to perform quite well, and it's very economical.

    Back to the OP's question, neither CacheFly or PantherExpress support ESI anyways. He would need to look at the higher end options like Akamai and MirrorImage for that.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •