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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
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    41

    Growing Windows and Linux web server market

    I decided to start a new post here, following the discussion at this thread http://www.webhostingtalk.com/showthread.php?p=4296199 , regarding "Are hosted applications the future?"

    Rackmount input the news that Microsoft is building $40 bil data center. Here are some thoughts.

    Microsoft has 30% web server market share for Windows. Apache has 60%. In order to grow Windows share, .NET will be the key driver. Building data centers as .NET infrastructure is a long term investment for MS to stay as the leader in 10-20 years to come. With .NET, more online applications are built for Windows server and therefore, creates more demand. Let's say maybe it could grow to 60%.

    On the other hand, what can Apache do to keep that share? Apache doesn't really belong to any giant. There are some key players like cPanel, and Plesk (but Plesk is in the middle of both Windows and Linux). cPanel has the large ownership of hosting control panel that drives the web hosting market. In order to keep that Linux-Apache market share, strategic alliance should be formed to provide more value-added hosted applications to the market.

    If not, once Windows take over, the demand for Linux-based applications will start to drop.

    Just some thought.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
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    1,270
    What you are saying is logical. I believe in the long run Opensource will not win. Good things don't last long. Buy and selling item is the way of life. Apache needs to stop giving there products out for free and selling. This way they can be more competitive with Microsoft. They people who are writing the software can get paid for there hard work.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
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    41
    I think open source vendor has to start selling their product at commercial price. It's wiser not to provide a free product and charge expensively for the support. When makes money, then it will be the motivation to produce even greater products.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by mohamoud
    What you are saying is logical. I believe in the long run Opensource will not win. Good things don't last long. Buy and selling item is the way of life. Apache needs to stop giving there products out for free and selling. This way they can be more competitive with Microsoft. They people who are writing the software can get paid for there hard work.
    Are you kidding? Half of the reason people go Open Source is because it is free, business are migrating their applications to save on licensing costs. To start charging for software such as Apache would be a step back for the whole OSS community and the people who have worked so hard to support it.

    I don't honestly believe there is competition between the *nix and win market, each OS has it's use and is good at something the other isn't. Windows is great if you need ASP applications, Linux is great for PHP related applications. In terms of functionality they are 2 different beasts, but the OSS version of the beast is becoming popular because of it's price.
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  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
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    Let me give you an example beween PHPBB and Vbulletin. I believe the reason Vbulletin is better is because people are earning money for there product. So they make a really good product so many people can buy it. But PHPBB they really don't have a major movtivation. They aren't making money off PHPBB. Most of them have jobs and that takes time away from working on PHPBB. But if they are selling PHPBB. They will have an extra 40 hours (average work hours a week) to work on PHPBB and don't forget work stress. Dis making a better product. I am not saying let's make the software expensive. Just enough to pay the people who make it. I say expect nothing for free.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    501
    Apache doesn't really belong to any giant. There are some key players like cPanel, and Plesk
    Is IBM good enough? Though they have their own software, IBM invests over $100 million in Linux alone. There are many huge companies that do the same. Yahoo runs Apache, I believe, and on FreeBSD.
    I think open source vendor has to start selling their product at commercial price.
    They can sell products containing the program but not the product itself. iow, you can buy FreeBSD disks and manuals but you can download the OS for free. Same with Linux. By selling the product you are defeating the whole FOSS idea.
    Half of business will switch to Linux
    2/3 of business will not upgrade to Vista or Office2007
    IE7 is nine years behind the standards or wrong.
    But it works in IE!
    "IE is a cancer on the web" -- Paul Thurott
    "Avoid hacker-bait apps like Internet Explorer" -- Kevin Mitnick

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    3,100
    Quote Originally Posted by mohamoud
    Let me give you an example beween PHPBB and Vbulletin...
    Bulletin board is not platform. I could easily counter your comments with Dreamwaver vs Quanta example, but that would miss the main point of this thread as well. There are four main reasons OSS exists and GROWS.

    1. It it has no licensing costs attached to it and it is cheaper to develop applications for/with it.

    2. There is very thin line between developers and users. No many new developments come as a surprise but rather they are result of community brainstorming. If there is improvement I would like to see implemented and if it makes sense, I can have very reasonable expectation that it WILL happen. Contrast that to development cycle of commercial software. More often then not new version releases are driven not by user input and needs but rather by marketing department needs and general market conditions.

    3. People enjoy giving back to OSS projects. It is almost absurd, but often individual will willingly invest more time and money in OSS then they ever would in commercial software and they will feel good about it.

    4. Customization. As source is freely and fully available anyone who has need to change something can change it. For large organization this could mean a difference between hiring a few in-house developers or asking MS to build custom version of windows and .NET platform that would fit there needs the best.

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