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  1. #1
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    Dec 2006
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    What does 100% SLA means?

    What does 100% SLA means?

  2. #2
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    same here, I would like to know

  3. #3
    I think that there is nothing can be 100% on to world.

  4. #4
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  5. #5
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    It means that the company will offer a 100% uptime service level agreement - not a guarantee. That basically means should your uptime fall below this level you will receive a refund of X percent for every so many minutes the service is down for.

    Some companies run it slightly differently but most do it this way, including us.

    FYI - You should check what the refund actually is and compare, many just say "100% SLA" and don't bother mentioning what you get when things go down...

    Dan

  6. #6
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    Dec 2006
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    Thank you very much, Dan.

  7. #7
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    You will also notice a lot of even the bigger providers say 100% SLA, but if you read the terms that means it only applies if there is an entire network outage and not a partial. So if some customers are up and some are down it does not count as an outage.

  8. #8
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    There is 100% for Network with better companies.

    Multiple providers, redundant network, redundant power, etc...

    Even routine maintenance can be done without causing a network outage.

    But, you should always read the SLA to verify what is covered and what they provide if a failure occurs.

  9. #9
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    Dec 2006
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    69
    I will.

    Thanks!

  10. #10
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    Service level agreement's are to be taken as statements of putting forth best effort practices and policies to live up or come as close to the "promises" made in the SLA(s).

    You are compensated, differing by provider, if the provider fails to meet their set guidelines for performance.

    Pretty simple but I've seen it abused.
    Last edited by ItsChrisG; 08-12-2007 at 01:09 AM.

  11. #11
    Join Date
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    Dallas, TX
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    As you can see from the posts there is no one answer. ~generally~ in this business there are 3 main factors for which Service Level Agreements are drawn up:

    Power
    Network
    Hardware

    Some companies have standard SLA's from which they do not deviate. Other companies will provide whatever level of service you require provided you are willing to pay for the services.

    Real life 100% SLA on Power and Network is doable, but very expensive. As already mentioned, you have to look closely in the agreements to see what is covered.

    Hardware SLA's are different for dedicated servers than for shared hosting outfits. Since this is in the DS forum... Unless your dedicated server plan includes several machines, I would be _very_ wary of anyone guaranteeing you machine uptime.

    Some other things that are commonly guaranteed in the industry are: a response time to reboot requests, guaranteed window of time for server reimaging, backup restoration, hardware replacement, etc - but all of those things are dependent upon the individual organization with whom you choose to do business.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
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    285
    Quote Originally Posted by ItBroker View Post
    What does 100% SLA means?
    It means that you will have 100% uptime 95% of the time.

  13. #13
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    New York
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    technically i suppose if a provider advertises a 100% SLA, and any of the components covered by such agreements fail, then unless otherwise provided for following such failure ( refund etc ) then the provider is in breach of contract (since they would have agreed as part of the contract to provide 100% uptime on said elements, and have failed to do so ) resulting in you being able to walk away from said contract without penalty or prejudice.

    Technically speaking of course lol.
    Perigee Global Corporation
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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by jNive View Post
    technically i suppose if a provider advertises a 100% SLA, and any of the components covered by such agreements fail, then unless otherwise provided for following such failure ( refund etc ) then the provider is in breach of contract (since they would have agreed as part of the contract to provide 100% uptime on said elements, and have failed to do so ) resulting in you being able to walk away from said contract without penalty or prejudice.

    Technically speaking of course lol.
    Not true. 99.9% of providers have contingencies written into the contract upon a failure to perform to 100% SLA.

    I.E. Credit to account of x amount for x amount of outage time, etc....

    I doubt you will find any provider who has written in that a failure to perform 100% SLA is a full breach of contract allowing you out of the contract.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by XSI-Larry View Post
    Not true. 99.9% of providers have contingencies written into the contract upon a failure to perform to 100% SLA.

    I.E. Credit to account of x amount for x amount of outage time, etc....

    I doubt you will find any provider who has written in that a failure to perform 100% SLA is a full breach of contract allowing you out of the contract.
    Exactly, an SLA is not a contract it is a best effort statement.

  16. #16
    Greetings:

    Some things to consider about service level guarantees:

    1. Carefully review what the SLA covers. Sometimes it is just local network traffic, and as long as the data center private network is up, they have their up time even if your equipment cannot conduct traffic on the public internet.

    2. The best SLA’s are the ones you never have to engage; meaning, you are up to the degree you need.

    3. Carefully review how you get credits ($$$) against an SLA if the SLA is not met; does the payout method match the SLA?

    We co-locate our equipment, and when we reviewed data centers before making our choice at a 99.999% facility, we saw various contracts where there was a 99.999% SLA up time guarantee, but the payout schedule was written for 99.5%.

    Also watch for language where the payout covers only portions of the bill vs. 100% of the invoice.

    Thank you.
    ---
    Peter M. Abraham
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