Page 6 of 10 FirstFirst ... 3456789 ... LastLast
Results 76 to 90 of 146
  1. #76
    Wow great tutorial

  2. #77
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    103
    Really nice tutorial, hope it is going to reduce the amount of bandwidth and space users are asking for because some requests are really crazy.

  3. #78
    Thanks for the tutorial, very useful

  4. #79

    cirtexhosting

    Thank you for that Bandwidth formula its really helpful in determining the bandwidth any site must have.
    Everybody must know this.

  5. #80
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    London & Valencia
    Posts
    15
    most space gets taken by media. upload photos to flickr, video to vimeo, and embed from there.

  6. #81
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Delhi, India
    Posts
    2
    basically we need only 100-200 MB of storage for a normal website.
    We should differentiate between Web Hosting and File Hosting.
    Just upload and run your main pages/scripts on your host and upload all other files, movies, pics, videos etc. to various free file hosts.

    This will save the valuable bandwidth and disk space of your website and doesn't overload the CPU/HDD of the server.

  7. #82
    Quote Originally Posted by muneer View Post
    How much monthly (bandwidth)Data Transfer do you need:


    Try using the following formula to estimate your site's monthly data transfer.

    [Average size of your web page(s) + any graphics included within] * [number of visitors you expect each day * number of pages each visitor will view] * [30 days in a month] = Total Monthly Data Transfer Usage.
    There are some obvious limitations to this formula which I feel greatly understate how much one might potentially use.

    Mine: [20kb + 0] * [2000 * 100] * [30] = 14.3051147 gigabytes
    It is understated by quite a bit as I go through almost 50 gigs a month.

    1) Average size of a webpage is a bad base because people tend to view larger pages more often. Those pages attract more search engines since they have more keywords and people usually leave more comments and posts. You are better off taking your largest page and using that to multiply with as those large pages are seen the most often.
    Sidenote: Remember that when you check how big your page is that it should also include css, javascript, and other offsite includes that may only be downloaded once but some browsers don't handle that correctly or you may get a lot of newer users. Also, some new people may forget that the filesize on the server is not the size of the page sent if it is a dynamic site and the difference can be quite large.

    2) Inbound traffic is not recorded here. Most people don't think about it but almost all hosts record inbound and outbound traffic (and sometimes even ftp traffic from the owner). People posting on forums or uploading an image/video can use a decent amount of bandwidth without even realizing it. Even static sites still have overhead in sending a page and receiving a request. And if there is ajax that could be sending information back and forth without you even knowing.

    Finally, if you are running something other than a static personal site that will probably just sit there or a local business site that is only informative I would use something much more lenient:

    I would take this formula and times the expected number of users by 2 (or more to allow for a little growth or a good month!), take the largest page on your site (as that is the one most likely being viewed the most), and put them into the formula. Then take about 20% for overhead/inbound and add that on. The more dynamic the site the more I would allocate extra as they usually grow pretty exponentially.

  8. #83
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    UK, Kent
    Posts
    64
    I'm actually in huge need of alot of space. I used vpsland but then there were capacity stuff and ram/space/bandwidth.

  9. #84
    It all depends what you are want to do with your website. If you are going to blog every day, add photos or videos, and how much traffic you are planning on receiving. Yes, you can come up with a ball park estimate, but in the end, you never know exactly how much you are going to need each and every month.

  10. #85
    Quote Originally Posted by bubazoo View Post
    #2 NEVER trust a host that doesn't accept paypal.

    Well, its not that I don't trust a host with my credit card number, well I don't but thats beside the point. The reason I think paypal billing is so important, you never know what the person on the other end is using your Credit Card # for. Maybe not the host, but datacenter, or a bad employee that works for the host, I mean you never know. I had my credit card number stolen from a host web before, and it was NOT fun getting all those charges off my credit card, especially when all I had was a debit card. With debit cards, there is no fraud protection, so once charges are made, its gone, end of story, so for that reason, I don't trust ANY host anymoore with my credit card. paypal or NOTHING in my book or pay by check with snail mail, but NEVER by credit card.
    Tom
    I know this post is kind of old, but I caught the above statement baffles me. Is this the norm? Is this what people expect? I cringe at the thought of doing business with PayPal!! In fact I was not going to accept PayPal when I get my hosting company up. You have very little rights through PayPal and they are not even regulated by US Gov't

    Code:
    Regulation
    The law is unclear as to whether PayPal is a bank, narrow bank, money services business or money transmitter. PayPal could also be subject to state regulation, but state laws vary, as do their definitions of banks, narrow banks, money services businesses and money transmitters. The most analogous regulatory source of law for PayPal transactions comes from P2P payments using credit and debit cards.
    
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PayPal

  11. #86
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    11
    Nice tutorial.

  12. #87
    I think that most of us use around 20% of what we pay for. I think this is what most hosts are banking on: consumers not knowing and overpaying So what does that mean? Hosting companies are currently getting paid for 5 times as much as what you are using.

    They should be ashamed of themselves.

  13. #88

    Smile

    Great post, very informational for anyone that's new looking for a host and is not sure what they will need.

  14. #89
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    14
    This is an important topic, I've often had to explain to friends looking into getting hosting that:

    1) there is not such thing as unlimited hosting (nothing is unlimited)
    2) if they did manage to get a site that actually needed 50gb+ of bandwidth they would likely have a booming business or HEAVILY trafficked blog on their hands, in which case they could certainly justify decent hosting!

    That being said, I wouldn't emphatically agree that all "unlimited hosting" plans are bad. Its just that they have the potential to be. I've hosted with Bluehost for years, with very few issues, and ive recently signed up with Justhost and Dreamhost and also not had any problems, though Dreamhost is slower than the others imho.

    A reputable unlimited bandwidth host is fine, my advice would be to place less emphasis on how much storage/bandwidth you're receiving and more on the quality/reputation of the company.

  15. #90
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Las Vegas, Nevada
    Posts
    487

    Cool

    Quote Originally Posted by Gavin84 View Post
    This is an important topic, I've often had to explain to friends looking into getting hosting that:

    1) there is not such thing as unlimited hosting (nothing is unlimited)
    2) if they did manage to get a site that actually needed 50gb+ of bandwidth they would likely have a booming business or HEAVILY trafficked blog on their hands, in which case they could certainly justify decent hosting!

    That being said, I wouldn't emphatically agree that all "unlimited hosting" plans are bad. Its just that they have the potential to be. I've hosted with Bluehost for years, with very few issues, and ive recently signed up with Justhost and Dreamhost and also not had any problems, though Dreamhost is slower than the others imho.

    A reputable unlimited bandwidth host is fine, my advice would be to place less emphasis on how much storage/bandwidth you're receiving and more on the quality/reputation of the company.
    I agree about the more emphasis on quality and reputation as well as service offerings, support, and security.

    Plan provisioning for the most part is just a marketing ploy and perhaps even a insult to the avg consumer intelligence. Honestly - one would have to question someone who selects a host that notes 1000 email address over 250 thinking well the more the better vs really how many are they going to use for their domain.

    Storage and Bandwidth are taken advantage of all over the place.

    As more and more consumers are educating them selfs - the quality hosting providers will prevail.

    Then you see the other side of the coin and those hosts that attempt to gain market share based on price point alone.

    2 to 3 bucks a month or the price of a good cup of coffee for the true value of quality hosting is sad.

    The client must ask them selfs "how much" is my business class hosting worth to my business.

    I think the consumer should ask them selfs the same -

    Anyway - observations to ponder but remember this is IMHO

    Peace,

    Dave
    LiquidLayer.net ● Liquid Layer Networks ● Linux ZFS, SSD, VPN, Varnish, Shared, VPS, Dedicated
    Community.HostCheetah.com ● Tech and Host News, Views, Tips, Tricks, HowTo ●
    Global Hosting Locations : | USA | UK | AU | BU | NL | liquidlayer.net/video-overviews

Page 6 of 10 FirstFirst ... 3456789 ... LastLast

Related Posts from theWHIR.com

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •