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  1. #51
    thanks for this tutorial
    I know now what to look for

  2. #52
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    India
    Posts
    542
    Very good tutor for new bees. Most of the new comers are astonished by the space and bandwidth announced to be offered by big hosting companies. But, in reality they need very little.
    ►ExpertWebHost.NET- Instant reliable CPanel hosting since 2008+
    ►Quality Shared, Reseller and VPS hosting
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  3. #53
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    41
    What about video or live streaming how do you calculate?

  4. #54
    Quote Originally Posted by kemuel View Post
    As a comment to #4 in bubazoo's big post there. Cpanel really isn't the best control panel, it's just what most people seem to be used to. So if you're not used to anything yet look around at other things too. For the rest I pretty much agree, get what you need, don't let big numbers seduce you or just the looks of a site, read everything, research it and verify it.

    Hmmm... what in your opinion would be a better hosting panel than cpanel that has the level of flexibility and multiple domain hosting that cpanel offers?

  5. #55
    Well H-sphere is my personal favorite, but it is more expensive. Depending on your purpose there are better and worse ones of course.

  6. #56
    Though H-sphere gives you an all-in solution, billing, support desk, etc... So if you plan to do webhosting it will end up cheaper. For personal servers there's h-sphere cheaper single-server edition as well, but it is of course still intended as a webhost solution.

  7. #57
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    127.0.0.1
    Posts
    3,635
    Actually - if you do a TCO (huh?) of H-Sphere vs. just about any non-integrated control panel + the additional software required to make it work the same -- you would be spending alot more money.

    Let's take cPanel since that seems to be the favorite around here:

    $20/mo. - Partner NOC cPanel License
    $49.95/mo - ModernBill 1000 User License
    $35/mo - Cerberus License for 5 Users.

    Total: $104.95

    (All pricing taken from their vendor websites as of today).

    We haven't even figured in the server costs, just software (since they will most likely be the same server in either scenario). Even with this setup, you still don't have a true, fully integrated system like H-Sphere which can support Linux/Windows/FreeBSD/Dedicated Server/Exchange/Sharepoint Support and more.

    Typically, H-Sphere licenses (directly from Psoft; list price) run about $4/one time per account (instance of CP/billing). The ROI on that $4 is *much* quicker than all of the above list as it is an *ongoing* cost, which does not even support multiple platforms/environments.

    However, you can also *rent* H-Sphere licenses for as little as $0.50/month from some providers which lowers the cost of entry to most providers quite significantly.

    Hope this helps....

    Quote Originally Posted by kemuel View Post
    Well H-sphere is my personal favorite, but it is more expensive. Depending on your purpose there are better and worse ones of course.
    Correct -- however, you really need the full edition to unlock H-Sphere's full potential .

    Quote Originally Posted by kemuel View Post
    Though H-sphere gives you an all-in solution, billing, support desk, etc... So if you plan to do webhosting it will end up cheaper. For personal servers there's h-sphere cheaper single-server edition as well, but it is of course still intended as a webhost solution.
    Simpli Networks, LLC :: http://www.simplinetworks.com :: Proudly 100% Owned.
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  8. #58
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Toronto, Canada
    Posts
    511
    you are comparing apples and oranges. The reality is you need to have multiple solutions from multiple vendors tailored to your own organization to make it work. - H-Sphere is now part of Plesk, or Parallels oh so is modernbill - so it goes for now and by next week the constant of change will take effect and who know what else will be out there --
    Rebel Networks
    Geek Powered Hosting - The CLoud Made Simple
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    Please Visit us @ www.rebelnetworks.com

  9. #59
    What a great post (OP). Many folks just don't realize how little space and bandwidth they really need.
    Daniel B., CEO - x90x.net
    Xoomsite.com is now x90x.net

  10. #60
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    England
    Posts
    8
    Really nice tutorial.

    I have 5 GB, completely useful.

  11. #61
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Orange County, CA
    Posts
    532
    Quote Originally Posted by mripguru View Post
    Actually - if you do a TCO (huh?) of H-Sphere vs. just about any non-integrated control panel + the additional software required to make it work the same -- you would be spending alot more money.
    Sure, but if you're talking about any of those licenses "as-a-service" (like you quoted for our pricing), then your TCO should also consider the fact a hosted service is like having an extra server, more storage space and possibly no bandwidth bill.

    The redundancy that allows you to still talk to your customers (helpdesk, live chat, billing) while your main server is down is quite a bit of value on the other side of your TCO example.

    I'm a bit biased when it comes to our app, of course. But for us I'd say the same thing about Campfire, Ubersmith or Salesforce. We could host it all ourselves and pretend it's cheaper if the licensing alone was the TCO. It's not.
    Jeff Standen, Chief of R&D, WebGroup Media LLC. - LinkedIn
    Cerb is a fast and flexible web-based platform for business collaboration and automation. http://www.cerbweb.com/

  12. #62
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    39
    the safest place to know How Much Space and Bandwidth You Need to Host Your Site is...
    1.by contact the host for suggestion,
    2. negotiate the price for discount when it is possible.

  13. #63
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    in my room
    Posts
    29
    so if i have 25+ domains on a server and have a couple of pages for each etc with ads etc how much space will it take up and how fast will my bandwidth go?


    (trying to convince myself that clicking the wrong button and ordering 60gb of bandwidth and 6gb of space isnt a total waste of $12 over 30gb of bandwidth and 3gb space.

  14. #64
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    10
    Quote Originally Posted by ac1d1dty View Post
    so if i have 25+ domains on a server and have a couple of pages for each etc with ads etc how much space will it take up and how fast will my bandwidth go?


    (trying to convince myself that clicking the wrong button and ordering 60gb of bandwidth and 6gb of space isnt a total waste of $12 over 30gb of bandwidth and 3gb space.
    yes. but what is it for? then?

  15. #65
    It is about a kilobyte of disk space per page of text (and code), images and downloads are what take up disk space and even images dont take up much normally, unless you are running some kind of photo site. To calculate bandwidth just multiply the size of the pages+images people will see with how many times they will see it.

  16. #66
    wow, thanks. i never really payed attention to the bandwith sections. but, what happens when you go over your bandwith? does it like go down?

  17. #67
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Home Town
    Posts
    53
    Most hosting services providers will suspend it and ask you to upgrade. They may inform you when you are nearing the limit as sort of early warning.

  18. #68
    thanks for such great share^^

  19. #69
    Is there any good book or other resource out there that can help shed some light on how much bandwidth AND what kind of hardware any given site might need? Can't give any details on what I have in mind because it's currently in development. It's a RoR site, not sure on expected hits, etc...

  20. #70
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Planet Earth
    Posts
    153
    scol - PM me and I will coach you through it or we can do it here in the open forum for everyone

    -Chris
    Professional Plesk Webhosting.
    No overselling.
    Always available for you.
    http://www.64bithost.com - 1-352-3164619

  21. #71
    1gb space and 5gb bandwidth is enough for me

  22. #72
    To be honest most people do not need even half as much of what their hosting plan offers them, hence why hosting companies are even able to oversell on their servers so easily.

    In my opinion if you're just starting out you shouldn't jump in the deep end with such a large hosting plan. The chances are that you will be wasting money for at least the first couple of months until your site really starts to pick up momentum.

    So my advice on choosing how much disk space and bandwidth you should look for in a hosting plan is this.

    - For disk space, consider the total file size of your site and multiply it by 5.

    - For bandwidth, I personally use the rule that your bandwidth amount should be at least 10 times the total combined file size of your site.

    It's always worked for me in the past.

  23. #73
    I think in most cases you tend to find out that you usually over compensate how much you need. Most clients I talk to say they need 8gigs of space, then they turn around and only use 100MBs - I guess it's always nice to have a little leeway - sure - but if you're not using it, then you're wasting it.

  24. #74
    Simply That depends on your requirement. Just don't rush behind this and see what you exactly want.

  25. #75
    Quote Originally Posted by bubazoo View Post
    #1 rule of thumb when choosing a webhost

    1. NEVER trust a site that says "unlimited bandwidth"

    that is probably THE #1 rule, for any customer to keep in mind. Unless your google, or a celebrity, or someone with a very large user base, chances are your not going to use more then a few gigs of bandwidth anyway, so don't ask for, or expect, what the web host probably cannot deliver. I like the idea of starting out with 1 gig. Even if you go over, at least you'll know how much you need, thats better then estimating anyday.

    Most hosts do not suspend your account if you go over anyway. Most of the decent ones just charge you more for the extra bandwidth at the end of the month, and leave you a friendly email recommending you upgrade to a new plan, so its never a big deal.
    If a host suspends your account for going over, I'd suggest switching hosts. As much competition as their is now, with consumers getting into the web hosting biz, its not worth it, you can always find someone better then that.

    I actually have other such rules that I follow, which are more my own personal preferences then anything else, such as...

    #2 NEVER trust a host that doesn't accept paypal.

    Well, its not that I don't trust a host with my credit card number, well I don't but thats beside the point. The reason I think paypal billing is so important, you never know what the person on the other end is using your Credit Card # for. Maybe not the host, but datacenter, or a bad employee that works for the host, I mean you never know. I had my credit card number stolen from a host web before, and it was NOT fun getting all those charges off my credit card, especially when all I had was a debit card. With debit cards, there is no fraud protection, so once charges are made, its gone, end of story, so for that reason, I don't trust ANY host anymoore with my credit card. paypal or NOTHING in my book or pay by check with snail mail, but NEVER by credit card.

    #3 always do your homework. Pick a host that is fairly close to your geographical location. If you live in Chicago Illinois USA for example, and the majority of your user base is located in the United States somewhere also, don't pick a european or russian or UK host, for example, because not only will your visitors complain about the speed of your site, but you won't like going to your own site either, so pick a host thats fairly close to your geographical location, who has the backbone speed that you need.

    Also, make sure the host is an actual company, and not just some little kid playing "web hostie" with his dads spare computer lying around. Any decient web designer can make up a webpage looking like an actual web hosting company. An 11yr old could probably do it with frontpage 97 more the linkely. hehe. With routers and home networking, this pops up all the time, so remember to do your homework throughly. If its possible, call the websites number, talk to people over the phone, go visit the company, if possible, make sure the host is who they say they are.

    #4 and of course, this is my personal favorite, esp for newbies, since newbies generally switch hosts ALOT trying to find one that suits them best.. get a host that uses CPANEL, and Fantastico, and RVSkin. I absolutely cannot stress that enough. Reason being, cpanel has a very nice "site transfer" script that you can use to transfer your site over to a new host, just in case you run into problems, and have to switch hosts for some reason. It could be, the host goes out of business, or the customer support isn't what you expected. Whatever the reason, its always a good idea, not only to keep backups, but a way to transfer a host to a new server at any time. Even if you stick to the same host your entire life, its easier for the host to transfer your account to a new server if something goes wrong on their end, if you have Cpanel, so definitely get cpanel, I can't stress that enough.

    #5 and lastly, pick a host you like. Talk with a representative, ask him about the company, read reviews from others on what the customer service is like. Even if you talk to the host on the phone and visit the location, talk to others who have been with that host and ask them how their experiences are/were. I don't think its necessarily important to pick a host that has 20 minute guaranteed response times, or anything crazy like that, but at least pick one that gets back with you within the same day, who always lets you know whats going on, even if their working on the problem, its always a good idea to send out a quick email to the user to let them know the status, even if its not completed yet. That way, the user isn't left hanging out to dry, which usually ticks people off, especially if their site is down for any reason, they want to know whats going on. People don't so much mind their site being down, because problems always come up noone can guarantee 99.9 to 100% site uptime, thats just crazy, so long as the line of communication is open, customers really do understand. Personally, I think when customers do start yelling, or getting angry at the customer service reps, is almost always due to a lack of communication on the hosting providers part. it almost always is. I see it all the time.

    those are my recommendations.

    Tom
    nice share Tom, it helps me for web host. Thanks for sharing Tom

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