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  1. #1
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    Titanic trivia anyone?

    Hi!
    This is one of my interests..and TNT showing this "Titanic" movie tonight..reminded my of several interesting things.

    It's interesting..I did quite a bit of research on this when this movie first came out...and if there is some interest on the board..I'll share them. I don't want to post a rant that noone is intersted in..so I'll hold off and see if the interest is there before I share.
    For a change.

    Enough interest? Or back to work?

    >>Ohhh...I have some not-well-known engineering facts as well...I'll share..if ya'll want me to.

    Bryon
    Bryon L Harvey
    Soil Relocation Engineer

  2. #2
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    The Titanic's main shortcoming (other than the number of lifeboats) was its high sulfur content steel. Samples tested at freezing temperatures fractured during a Charpy test, where modern low sulfur steel merely bent. If I recall correctly from the documentaries on the subject, the dives also showed that many of the rivet heads simply popped off further weakening the joints between the plates.
    "Arms discourage and keep the invader and plunderer in awe, and preserve order in the world as well as property... Horrid mischief would ensue were the law-abiding deprived of the use of them." - Thomas Paine

  3. #3
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    im interested!

    have you seen any of the other titanic movies or just this one?
    if you haven't considered chapter 7 bankruptcy, maybe you should.
    eliminate your debt, keep the property you want, most people qualify.
    contrary to popular belief - no attorney is necessary!

  4. #4
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    Hi!
    I've seen a older version many years ago. I like finding interesting things that are *not* normally known. Of course..it is a common fact about the sulfur content.

    However...there are other things that are almost never mentioned.

    It is a well-known fact she was too big and her rudder was too small. However...what is not normally mentioned..was the iceberg white? Maybe not.

    Icebergs are floating pieces of ice..everybody knows that. What some people don't know..is as they are melting...they sometimes flip. When they do flip...suddenly the water that was on the bottom is now on the top...and..it is blue as the water surrounding it...and....extremely hard to see...

    The engineer in me was amazed at the detail and the pains that they took to make the engine room in the movie look so real. It was real..in fact. No CGI..no matter what the budget..could create the detail of that. However...I had no doubts it was not life size. Why would they spend that kind of money on something that was to be used just once..for this movie? They didn't...

    http://marconigraph.com/fox70.html

    You'll find tons of pictures and stuff on that website. Ain't the 'net great?

    Also...as a offside...many of you who have never build a model probably wonder..how do they make those lights so tiny? Like in even smaller models..like...say..the Star Trek models? They don't. Those are not bulbs at all..they are tiny pieces of fiber optic plastic that have a light source inside the model that you never see...

    The engineer in me also wanted to know more about those engines. While it is true a few engine makers were starting to make turbine-powered steam engines..the company that build Titanic had just begun to build them..and incorporate them in their designs. If you will notice..Tinanic did indeed have three props..but only two engines...how was the third powered? A turbine..with exhaust steam from the other two engines.

    It is also interesting that these engines were extremely efficient for their day.
    The engines had three stages..each stage smaller than one next to it..because the steam exhausted from the first stage..went to the second stage..and the third stage (the smallest) got steam from the second stage.

    And..of course..I have to throw in some movie trivia. In that one scene..when the bow flips..it seems like many people were injured..it seems inevitable. In fact..they did. If memory serves..a few of them even earned a trip to the emergency room.

    There are several eye-witness accounts in books available. I hate to disappoint you...but nobody remembers the band playing on. Still..one can understand if it really did happen that way. Oh..many accounts do hold that the crow's nest watchman had really misplaced his binoculars..which added another piece to the puzzle..too fast..blue berg...too late.

    Being in Atlanta...I was aware that in the main library...they had newspapers going back past 1900's on microfilm..but the quality was not good in many of them.
    Still...some didn't even have photographs yet..many had nothing but hand-drawn pictures..and was interesting to look at.

    I did find a horribly inaccurate account...just to show you that the information was sometimes terribly wrong...that the Titanic did indeed have a accident...but was still headed to port on her own steam. I imagine that gave many people false hope..just as happened not so long ago with that mining accident.

    There were many lawsuits following this...and at least many laws were put in effect to make sure ships had enough lifeboats..just in case.

    Shipbuilders have long since stopped using a certain word..."unsinkable". However...I did notice with dismay that this title was attached to a commission not too long ago...to the USS Ronald Reagan. I doubt the shipbuilders themselves did that..after Titanic...oh..how the press loves buzzwords.

    Anyways..the movie being shown on TNT made me think of these things once again.

    Enjoy that site...there are many others..just google specific things...like "Titanic <whatever>". Remember..the more info you give it..the better the results will be...most of the time.

    Bryon
    Bryon L Harvey
    Soil Relocation Engineer

  5. #5
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    Interesting post, but this is incorrect:
    In that one scene..when the bow flips..
    It was the stern that "flips"...the back end. She sank from the bow, splitting nearly in two, with the bow dragging the stern somewhat as it fell..

  6. #6
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    Hi!
    Of course..you are correct. The bow hit the berg first..that went down first.
    Sorry...a ruddy landlubber I admit to be!

    Bryon
    Bryon L Harvey
    Soil Relocation Engineer

  7. #7
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    Some pretty interesting facts there, I had never really thought of how they did the engine room. How did they manage to get the people working in such a small model???
    Walker

  8. #8
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    Hi!
    They didn't..of course. If you pay close attention to the person crossing the gangway..you can tell it was blue-screened in...or at least I can.

    Bryon
    Bryon L Harvey
    Soil Relocation Engineer

  9. #9
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    The Titanic was one of three identical ships built in Dublin.

    http://members.aol.com/WakkoW5/olympic.html
    The Olympic sailed 10 months before the Titanic. On it's 5th crossing it collided with a smaller navy ship that put it out of service for 5 months and added to the "unsinkable" claim. After the Titanic sinking a double hull and additional life boats were added. In WW1 the ship was commandered for transport service. It was back in trans-Atlantic service after the war and in 1934 struck the Nantucket lighthouse killing 11 crewmen. The Olympic was dismantled and scrapped in 1937.

    http://members.aol.com/WakkoW5/britannic.html
    The Britannic was under construction when the Titanic sank, and was redesigned with more lifeboats and a double hull. In 1915 (WW1) the ship was commandered and converted to a hospital ship. In 1917 it was either torpedoed or struck a mine off Greece and sank.

    More info: http://members.aol.com/wakkow5/titnsis.html

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