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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2001
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    1,513

    Types of Nameservers

    What is an alias nameserver, and what is its purpose?

    If you use your host's nameservers to host your domain, what type of nameservers would that be referred to as?

    Are there any other types or definitions of nameservers?

  2. #2
    Officially speaking, there is only one type of name server. For instance, on a shared network, the DNS server's names would usually reflect that of the web hosters.

    For example, ns1.webhoster.com and ns2.webhoster.com

    Typically if your site is hosted on that server, you would probably point to that two servers.

    However, if you are a reseller and do not want your customers to know if you hosted on webhoster.com , you might want to change the DNS servers to one which may reflect your name, such as

    ns1.mywebsite.com and ns2.mywebsite.com. This may look a little more professional but naturally you are just using an alias or a different name for the same DNS servers. Thus at first glance, it looks like you have your own server and thus own DNS servers.

    In which cause, no matter if you point to ns1.webhoster.com or ns1.mywebsite.com , it will still reflect the same name server.

    I believe you would already know that the name server host the domain definition table. So when you reflect to a domain name, it would internally refer you to the right server and location in which your site is hosted in.


    Hope that helps.

    Edwin
    http://www.batchimage.com - Offering Batch Image Processing and TIFF/PDF Software Solutions

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    242
    Alias'ed nameservers are as follows (I THINK):

    You are the webhost, you have

    NS1.webhost.com ( 2xx.41.22.57 )
    and
    NS2.webhost.com ( 2xx.41.22.58 )

    You client can have

    NS1.HISDOMAIN.COM ( 2xx.41.22.57 )
    and
    NS2.HISDOMAIN.COM ( 2xx.41.22.58 )

    Dont know how much sense that made, but i hope it helps.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Posts
    1,513
    Hmmmm... the reason I asked is because I thought I've seen some hosts advertise your own nameservers and also aliased nameservers. I thought they might be different, or that maybe a host named onefasthost.com, might have nameservers named something like boll.com or ofh.net, something that wasn't easily recognized as belonging to that host... that's what I thought was meant by an aliased nameserver. Am I right or wrong on this?

    Also, what is Reverse DNS, and what is its purpose?
    Last edited by chrisb; 06-22-2002 at 01:54 AM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Posts
    447
    Not that I'd know anything about it, but this text, found in the description of hosting plans on httpme.com appears to explain some aspects of this:
    Personalised Nameservers: YES
    Totally Anonymous Nameservers: YES

    You can have your very own personalised nameservers like ns1.yourdomain.com and ns2.yourdomain.com or use our totally anonymous nameservers so there's no trace back to us whatsoever. Personalised nameservers come with 2 dedicated IP addresses at no extra cost. You also receive a dedicated IP address for your main domain name that you set the account up with. Your nameservers will be based around the domain name that you open your HTTPme.com account with. For personalised nameservers, we supply the IP addresses and it's up to you to contact your domain register and have them registered to your nameservers. You only need personalised nameservers if you wish to resell our hosting plans to your hosting clients. If you do not wish to resell our plans, then the Anonymous Nameservers will serve you just fine. If you order your account with personalised nameservers, then your account might take 24 to 48hrs to setup. Hosting accounts with Anonymous Nameservers are usually setup much quicker than accounts with Personalised Nameservers.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Posts
    1,513
    Hey Astra, how'd ya know? That was the host where I read about it that made me curious in the first place. Thanks for posting that. I had forgot which host it was.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Posts
    37
    I have a personal webhosting plan with one of the hosts too. My site is just a personal site of mine. Eg. i have a domain like abc.com, is it possible to create the host ns1.abc.com and ns2.abc.com, and point it to the dns ip.. eg.. 2.2.2.2 and 2.2.2.3?

  8. #8
    Originally posted by hostboynerd
    I have a personal webhosting plan with one of the hosts too. My site is just a personal site of mine. Eg. i have a domain like abc.com, is it possible to create the host ns1.abc.com and ns2.abc.com, and point it to the dns ip.. eg.. 2.2.2.2 and 2.2.2.3?
    Well, if your plan supports alias nameservers, you can do it. You might want to get the exact instructions on how to do it from your web host directly.

    Set up at your domain name registrar would depend on the registrar itself.
    http://www.batchimage.com - Offering Batch Image Processing and TIFF/PDF Software Solutions

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Leesburg, VA
    Posts
    3,205
    Originally posted by eddy2099
    Officially speaking, there is only one type of name server. For instance, on a shared network, the DNS server's names would usually reflect that of the web hosters.
    Actually, there are two or three types of nameservers (depending on who you ask).

    There are authoritatative name servers, which is what you are talking about, and caching/recursive nameservers.

    Authoritative nameservers provide information about domain names. They can be broken into two types: primary and secondary. The Primary nameserver has the orginal zone file, where all the changes are made. Secondary nameservers, are also authoritative, but they pull their information from the primary nameserver.

    Caching/recursive nameservers sit on the local network and are used to query other nameservers to find out information about requested domains.

    None of this actually answers Chris' question, but there hasn't been a good DNS flamewar on this board all day .

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