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  1. #1

    Question Is there registryrocket cheaper $8.75

    Anyone know there registryrocket cheaper $8.75. I want regist domain and manage at access.enom.com , or anyone could create a reseller account of enom with price domain cheaper 8.75. Thank

  2. #2
    Marty Hoskins
    http://tlcwe.com

  3. #3
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    Why are you so cheap?

  4. #4
    Hi Dave,

    We get extremely low rates from eNom, though I'm sure you'll understand if I don't disclose them Rather than trying to make megabucks off every registration, we've decided to make a very (and I do mean VERY!) small percentage in order to offer a competitive wholesale package.

    Best wishes,
    Simon.
    http://www.AQHost.com
    Fast, reliable dual Intel Xeon servers
    Excellent uptime record
    Efficient and friendly support

  5. #5
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    Originally posted by AQHost
    Hi Dave,

    We get extremely low rates from eNom, though I'm sure you'll understand if I don't disclose them Rather than trying to make megabucks off every registration, we've decided to make a very (and I do mean VERY!) small percentage in order to offer a competitive wholesale package.

    Best wishes,
    Simon.
    No, I didn't bean why are your rates cheap, I meant, why is alsuler cheap. I mean people sit their and complain and bitch over a dollar, get real.

  6. #6
    LOL...cute misunderstanding! Thanks for clearing it up .

    Simon.
    http://www.AQHost.com
    Fast, reliable dual Intel Xeon servers
    Excellent uptime record
    Efficient and friendly support

  7. #7
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    No problem, your prices are good, but I hate when people bitch over a dollar.

  8. #8
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    Originally posted by iamdave
    ...but I hate when people bitch over a dollar.
    Agreed. I am continually stunned when I read messages in these and other forums wherein people learn of a new registrar reseller who charges a few cents -- or at least not more than a dollar -- less than they paid for their existing domains, and so they post that they're going to transfer all their domains to the new, cheaper registrar reseller immediately. It's ludicrous. And it's sloppy thinking -- which I hate even more than people who bitch over a dollar.

    By the way, based on the lowest price that eNom charges even their biggest resellers for domains, and based on eNom's fees and discount rate for Registry Rocket transactions, it would be a mathematical impossibility for a Registry Rocket interface to charge less than $8.14 per domain per year. If one did, the difference between $8.14 and what it actually charged less than that would come straight out of the reseller's account balance.

    By the time one recalculates eNom's discount rate for the higher amount charged, basically, an eNom reseller with a Registry Rocket interface selling domains at $8.75 is making maybe 50 cents or thereabouts... and that's only if said reseller is getting eNom's lowest reseller price. Frankly, at only 50 cents profit, I wouldn't expect the reseller to be around all that long -- at least not if he's relying on Registry Rocket sales as his primary income.

    Has the old adage "you get what you pay for" lost all meaning around here or what?
    Gregg L. DesElms

  9. #9
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    I have to agree with DesElms. We are an eNom reseller. We are setting our base price at 13.50 for .com/net/org etc. That gives us quite a bit of room for discounts/special offers.

    We are not looking for customers that want the lowest price. I'd rather make a decent profit on 100 clients than no profit on 1,000. The client looking for the lowest price will jump ship as soon as they find something cheaper.

    Frank
    Umbra Hosting
    cPanel | Softaculous | CloudLinux | R1Soft | Ksplice
    Web Hosting, Reseller Hosting, VPS, Dedicated Servers, Colocation
    UmbraHosting.com

  10. #10
    Nice post as usual Mr. DesElms and yes, I agree too. Or at least for the most part anyway. Jumping ship for the sake of a few cents really isn't worth the hassle unless you're either an existing reseller yourself and/or are planning on doing some heavy volume as a reseller. For example if XYZ Host registers domains for their clients at $15 a pop and only does 10-20 per month, it's not worth bothering. However if XYZ Registrar retails an average of 100 domains per month for $10 a pop and can get a 75 cent reduction in their wholesale cost, it would be a more sensible business decision to make. That would represent a decent increase in net margin.

    Retail customers arguing over a difference of 10-20 cents and moving their domains on the basis of it need their heads examining. Look for service and features, there's enough competition out there to ensure that price is the least of your worries.

    We're an eNom reseller and retail at $8.95, but then it's not the main thrust of our business. Not by a long way. In fact the $8.95 price was designed as a hook to draw people in since there are close links between our hosting and registration sites. Path of least resistance and all that. Any profit from that side of things would be an unexpected bonus.

    Best wishes,
    Simon.
    http://www.AQHost.com
    Fast, reliable dual Intel Xeon servers
    Excellent uptime record
    Efficient and friendly support

  11. #11
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    Long ago the big-brainers at Harvard University's business school determined (and have been teaching to this day) that the optimum gross profit margin for a healthy business is 40%. Granted, that recommendation makes certain assumptions about product type, sales volume and other variables -- assumptions which may or may not be valid in an Internet economy. After all, a guy who sells refrigerators is probably not on the phone or in email discussions with most of his customers explaining how to set the thermostat and fill it with food. His product is also fairly ubiquitous as he's selling to a market wherein everyone around him needs one -- if not from him then from someone else. And, finally, he's selling a relatively big ticket item wherein the profit from a single sale is actually not insignificant. According to Harvard, he should do okay at a 40% gross profit -- that is, assuming a normal economy and his exercising a typical, responsible amount of care and control over his business and its inner workings.

    If there's any validity to Harvard's 40% rule -- and there is -- there shouldn't be a registrar on the planet selling for less than $10 or $11. And that's assuming they purchase their domains for a $6 or $7 wholesale price. Given a domain's lack of ubiquity among all those around us (as opposed to the relative minority consisting of those of us who live in this twisted little world of computers and the Internet), and the amount of support one must provide to an increasingly less sophisticated client base of non-technical users who are late adopters of the Internet and are finally taking a flyer on their own web sites, I would argue that $20 or $30 is the selling price level at which a registrar truly needs to be in order to even begin to hope for relative business health and soundness.

    Obviously most of the big registrars did that math, too, hence the typical $29 retail pricetag at most that are ICANN-approved. End-users are expected to absorb a significant part of that gross profit in registrar support resources. Resellers, on the other hand, are expected to be relatively self-supporting and, consequently, earn the somewhat lower wholesale price.

    That's how this industry should be operating, in my opinion. Sellers of domains should be wise enough to realize that retail end users will always demand wholesale-style prices but require retail-style support and, so, should turn a deaf ear to the din and hold the line on retail pricing to ensure financial stability. How and why this industry ever allowed retail customers to come to expect -- and, worse, to actually get -- $7 pricing for a product that costs $6 is, quite simply, beyond my ability to comprehend. The oft-heralded maxim of Harvard's business school as it teaches its tried-and-true 40% profit margin rule is, "One cannot make-up for lost margin with volume." It's a cardinal truth. Doing so is like leaning-up against a wall that's leaning back -- spinning plates and trying to keep any from hitting the ground. Sooner or later, the monster wins. And then what?

    I'm at $14.95 retail. By my logic espoused herein I should be charging more, but the market pressure simply won't allow me to stand on any more principle than that and still attract customers. But I won't go beneath that price even with a gun to my head. I give my customers -- howsoever few of them there may be -- the kind of support that makes them want to have my children. Ask any of them. And so when all is said and done, I'm not really making a penny on the proposition. If I had more volume so that I had to pay more employees to give only one-third that level and quality of support I'd nevertheless be bankrupt. And that's because, in the end, Harvard was right: You really can't make-up for lost margin with volume. You really can't.

    There's no magic to web business. It's no different than brick and mortar business. No one is giving web businesses a discount that they're not giving brick and mortar businesses just because they're web businesses. No one is taking less money to work for a web business just because they're not a brick and mortar business. The rules are the same. Always were. An expense is an expense. The profit has to come from somewhere. The dot com industry lost the notion of that somewhere along the way and look what happened.

    So now we all must decide, it seems to me. Do we learn from that experience or don't we? How many people must we watch touch a hot burner and recoil in pain before we agree that that's not something we also want to do?

    Math is math. The lessons numbers teach are immutable.
    Last edited by DesElms; 06-28-2002 at 12:14 PM.
    Gregg L. DesElms

  12. #12
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    Well put. Math never lies, politicians do it all the time

  13. #13
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    Originally posted by timechange
    Well put. Math never lies, politicians do it all the time
    So what happens when a politician does math?
    Gregg L. DesElms

  14. #14
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    Read my lips: no more taxes

  15. #15
    joker.com site is sometimes slow... I guess it's connection problem to/from Germany

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
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    I certainly agree how silly it is to shop for domains for a buck or two and how no one can make it with a 50 cent profit.

    The explanation for this pricing and consumer behavior is very basic however. It's about as close as we've ever had to a real example of a free market.

    The theory is that additional suppliers will move in as long as there is any profit whatsoever, driving the price to the consumer downward. So eventually, there will be no "real" profit in domain registration services.

    Since domain registration is closely associated with other services such as hosting, the true cost of the domain isn't even the price floor such service may be provided.

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