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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
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    15

    Quick question on mutlile hard drives...

    Alright this is a very simple question as I am pretty new to dedicated hostings.

    I have 2 hard drives... (bought 1 extra recently) from softlayer on a linux server. Both have 750GB space... I have used 90% of the first hard drive from download things using SSH. I am wondering... how do I store my downloads to the other hard drive? Or is it automatic? Thanks for your answers as they are appreciated!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Albany, NY
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    Your second drive should be mounted as something, so, if you look at your partitions using 'df -h' while in ssh, your second drive will come up as whatever the techs called it. Could be /home2 for example. After figuring that out, you can just save files to it manually.
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
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    I didn't know about raid untill I looked into it just now.. Is it better to have a RAID hard drive so it acts as 1 hard drive? Will I be able to just download and not need to download manually inn the second hard drive?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Jersey
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    Its definitely NOT automated. If you have cPanel control panel, you can do this procedure from WHM by just clicking on Format/Mount a new Hard Drive on the left.

    But if you prefer doing this from SSH, first you need to format the drive and then mount.

    first, execute the command below to find the drive you want to format...
    Code:
    fdisk -l
    then, execute the command below to format the drive, replace the * with the drive number
    Code:
    mkfs /dev/hd*
    last but not least, mount the drive, replace * with drive number and "home" with "home2" or what ever you want the drive to be called...
    Code:
    mount /dev/hd* /mnt/home
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  5. #5
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    Jan 2006
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    Jersey
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    Quote Originally Posted by MyTrickster
    I didn't know about raid untill I looked into it just now.. Is it better to have a RAID hard drive so it acts as 1 hard drive? Will I be able to just download and not need to download manually inn the second hard drive?
    I just read your second post, and I didnt realize earlier you wanted identical files on both of your HDs for fault tolerant purposes, your original post led me to believe you wanted to move the files to the new drive so you can make space on the existing drive for more files.

    For fault tolerant purposes, RAID 1 would work.
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  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    Jersey
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    Quote Originally Posted by MyTrickster
    I didn't know about raid untill I looked into it just now.. Is it better to have a RAID hard drive so it acts as 1 hard drive? Will I be able to just download and not need to download manually inn the second hard drive?
    Correct me if I am wrong here, but I think you are confused about what RAID does. RAID makes identical copies of all your files on your second drive in real time. So incase your first hard drive fails, raid will automatically switch to the other hard drive and there will be no downtime on your website.

    If you are looking for SPACE, you have to manually mount the drives like I showed above and then execute your SSH command for file downloads inside the newly mounted drive.
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  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    California USA
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    13,290
    Quote Originally Posted by Anantha
    Correct me if I am wrong here, but I think you are confused about what RAID does. RAID makes identical copies of all your files on your second drive in real time. So incase your first hard drive fails, raid will automatically switch to the other hard drive and there will be no downtime on your website.

    If you are looking for SPACE, you have to manually mount the drives like I showed above and then execute your SSH command for file downloads inside the newly mounted drive.

    Depends on the raid. Raid 5 for example:

    3 x 80gb drive in raid 5 gives one big drive of ~159gb. Raid 0 (not recommended at all) will give you a full 240
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  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    15
    What about 4 x 750 GB RAID 5's?? DOes that give you one like one big 2.5 TB??
    Last edited by MyTrickster; 11-05-2006 at 07:06 PM.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    15
    Quote Originally Posted by Anantha
    Correct me if I am wrong here, but I think you are confused about what RAID does. RAID makes identical copies of all your files on your second drive in real time. So incase your first hard drive fails, raid will automatically switch to the other hard drive and there will be no downtime on your website.

    If you are looking for SPACE, you have to manually mount the drives like I showed above and then execute your SSH command for file downloads inside the newly mounted drive.
    Yes I was confused about RAID hard drives... I just don't know how to download files to the new hard drive... and I tried those commands and it doesn't work for me... so yea (THe second har drive is already mounted)
    Last edited by MyTrickster; 11-05-2006 at 07:29 PM.

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