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  1. #1
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    How often should I reboot my dedicated server?

    my server is up and running for more than 1 year now.

  2. #2
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    I'd say once a month is good.. a year and no slow downs? Go you !

  3. #3
    The answer to your question will depend on what are you doing on server.

  4. #4
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    I have had machine up for over a year, which is kinda stupid.

    I believe a healthy regiment is a weekly reboot, JIC. I don't write every piece of code on that machine, I do know know of every memory leak......
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  5. #5
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    Why reboot if you don't have to?

    Why risk uncessary downtime?

    If the server is running fine, let it run fine. If it's slowing down and warrants a reboot, then reboot it.

    I'd rather use uptime as a tool. I.E if it doesn't stay up and healthy as long and requires more rebooting, then there's more to it and I can look into it before the problem get's worse.
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  6. #6
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    Why would you need to reboot? I have a few servers up 8+ months and some longer. You only need to reboot in case of a server issue or update.
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Katatonic
    Why reboot if you don't have to?

    Why risk uncessary downtime?
    A reboot is not what I would consider down time. Rebooting weekly is like taking an asprin a day so you don't have a massive heart attack at 50.

    rebootin is like chicken soup. it can't hurt.
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  8. #8
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    It depends on the OS you're using -- in my experience, servers running Linux or (Free)BSD only need to be rebooted for a) hardware upgrades or b) mandatory kernel upgrades.

  9. #9
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    Yeah, mine usually stay up till around the 90 day mark before I do something stupid and have to reboot.

    If it aint broke, don't fix it and if it is, buy a new one heh.
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by netscan
    If it aint broke, don't fix it and if it is, buy a new one heh.
    That's the cool thing about renting servers... just cancel the ones giving hardware problems and get newer ones

  11. #11
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    If it's a linux server you generally only reboot after a kernel upgrade.

    Windows whenever you need to. You can often avoid rebooting by downloading the standalone windows update patches.

    on either OS you may need to reboot more if you have a serious memory leak that is not easily fixed
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  12. #12
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    Yeah it makes a big difference which O/S is installed. But either way there are often times that rebooting just clears everything out. Although i rarely see it needed in Linux.

    Windows servers do require more reboots because of the updates that include kernel updates, but even then the system can be managed and not need rebooting all the time. I've left a windows server alone quite a long time and was fine. I didn't install the updates though (don't remember why).
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  13. #13
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    For linux you should reboot only when upgrade kernel. Just restart the program that was some memory leaks... if have.
    Don't blame unmanaged services for your errors. Redundancy is the key for 100% of uptime, nothing else matter

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by nsqlg
    For linux you should reboot only when upgrade kernel. Just restart the program that was some memory leaks... if have.
    I would also recommend rebooting after making other significant confuration changes - that way you test to make sure everything comes back up OK in the new config rather than parts reverting to the old. Much better to catch the problem while the changes are fresh in your mind an dnot at something in the morning a few months later when you get a pile of support tickets because something odd (power supply problems or some such) caused the server to reboot and didn't restart cleanly.

  15. #15
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    Reboot only after kernel upgrades, or when desperately needed!
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  16. #16
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    I have had a box before that i did not have to reboot for 2.5 years and it worked prefect with no slows downs OS was freeBSD
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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by PSFServers
    A reboot is not what I would consider down time. Rebooting weekly is like taking an asprin a day so you don't have a massive heart attack at 50.
    Taking an Aspirin a day may not give you a heart attack, but it will eventually eat away at your liver.

  18. #18
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    If it aint broke dont reboot.
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  19. #19
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    At least twice a day and 4 times on Sundays.

  20. #20
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    A reboot is not what I would consider down time. Rebooting weekly is like taking an asprin a day so you don't have a massive heart attack at 50.
    Yeah...but it's also overkill to a monumental extreme.

    As everyone else said, reboot when necessary for security/kern issues. Why reboot when there's absolutely no reason to?

  21. #21
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    Talking

    Quote Originally Posted by PE-Steve
    Taking an Aspirin a day may not give you a heart attack, but it will eventually eat away at your liver.
    On what do you base that?

    Oh wait wrong forum

    We only reboot when needed

    Alan

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by alan_torbay
    On what do you base that?

    Oh wait wrong forum

    We only reboot when needed

    Alan
    It was actually an analogy.

    Too many "Aspirin" (reboots) on a server will eventually eat away at its "liver" (hardware).

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by PE-Steve
    Too many "Aspirin" (reboots) on a server will eventually eat away at its "liver" (hardware).
    I've heard of stories of servers that ran fine for years and then get a fatal harddisk crash after a reboot

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Loktari
    I've heard of stories of servers that ran fine for years and then get a fatal harddisk crash after a reboot
    That is usually when the bearings are going so there is too much fritcion. The motors have enough umpf to keep the disc spinning while it is powered on but not to start it spinning once it has been settled for a while.

    I once saved most of the data on a drive in that condition with the "give it a quick gentle spin in your hand while powered on and connected" technique (if you are lucky the extra force will get the disc spining without mashing the heads into the platters and the motor will keep it going so you have one shot at getting the data off, if you are unlucky then you've made things no worse as the drive was dead anyway, either way backups are a man's best friend)

  25. #25
    I prefer not to RESTART after every now and than. Except hardware upgrades or kernel issues. Kinda stability thing.

  26. #26
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    If you use GNU/Linux, you need to reboot only for kernel updates (maybe 3-5 times a year). Every other part of the system can be restarted on its own, without needing the whole OS to go down.

  27. #27
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    Only reboot on kernel upgrades, in 95% of problems, a reboot may fix it but its not required. I cant stand how people reboot and reboot to fix issues on linux/bsd servers.
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  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steven
    Only reboot on kernel upgrades, in 95% of problems, a reboot may fix it but its not required. I cant stand how people reboot and reboot to fix issues on linux/bsd servers.
    Sounds like their Windows 95 roots, because even Windows Server 2003 can restart most subsystems without a reboot.

  29. #29
    rebootin is like chicken soup. it can't hurt.
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  30. #30
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    Funny coincidence... for some reason, KDE started freezing on my home desktop system so I had to reboot it a couple times. Bah

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Loktari
    Funny coincidence... for some reason, KDE started freezing on my home desktop system so I had to reboot it a couple times. Bah
    That's no reason for a reboot, you could've simply restarted kde from a console without rebooting your computer.

  32. #32
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    Good point Unfortunately I had no way to login because I don't have SSHD running on this machine. Guess I'm not 1337 enough... oh well.

  33. #33
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    I meant the local console (maybe you know it as "text mode").

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by RambOrc
    I meant the local console (maybe you know it as "text mode").
    That was the first thing I tried, but they keyboard didn't respond in any way.

    Oh well..... it's fixed now. Looks like some cache file got corrupted causing freezups.

  35. #35
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    Reboot it after a kernel upgrade, that is about it... There should be no other need to reboot it, especially if it has been running fine for 1 year without a reboot. Though, you're then saying you went a full year without a single kernel upgrade?
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