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  1. #1

    How much bandwidth does a 10Mbit connection really supply monthly?

    I know it's a constant connection but how does that translate into an actual monthly figure? Like what would happen if 100 people were downloading a video at the same time?

  2. #2
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    I think around 350GB. I might be wrong, but it was a rough calculation we did long time ago before moving to OC48
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  3. #3
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    Ahmed - you might want to add a 0 there . It's actually about 3200GB, give or take.
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  4. #4
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    3200-3300gb.

  5. #5
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    Yeah 3000, if it is pushing 10 Mbit 24/7. In practice that is never the case so you would see more like 1500 max using the normal daily usage patterns.

    You could get more out of it, if it is burstable and billed at 95th percentile above 10 M/bit, but that could get expensive depending on how often and how long the bursts are.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by yagigain
    Yeah 3000, if it is pushing 10 Mbit 24/7. In practice that is never the case so you would see more like 1500 max using the normal daily usage patterns.

    You could get more out of it, if it is burstable and billed at 95th percentile above 10 M/bit, but that could get expensive depending on how often and how long the bursts are.
    And a hosting company offering the plan would mention if it was burstable? (what do you mean billed at 95th percentile above 10m/bit?)

  7. #7
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    Yeah if it's a colo / dedicated service then it's pretty important to know if it is 10 m/bit capped or burstable. Burstable can get expensive on the 95th percentile if your get above 10 mbit often.

    Find out more about 95th percentile here,

    http://webdesign.about.com/od/colocation/a/aa012405.htm

    then when you've worked out how it is calculated you can come back and tell us all

  8. #8
    Hmmm...

    10Mb/s*60sec*60min*24hours*30day=25,920,000,000,000/8bitsperbyte=
    3,240,000,000,000 bytes or
    3,240 GB data/month
    (aka 3.24 TB/month)

    Thats a lot I think. Might be able to transfer the entire internet in a month or two. Not sure if that allows for overhead - checksum bits and whatnot. I just like doing simple arithmetic from time to time.

  9. #9
    I think that you have to understand there are a lot of hosting companies that provide 100 mbit port and it mens you get 3,240 GB data/month

  10. #10
    I think that you have to understand there are a lot of hosting companies that provide 100 mbit port and it mens you get 3,240 GB data/month
    Shouldn't that be 30,240 GB/month at 100Mb? Big M=mega. I think little m is milli.

  11. #11
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    You're looking at the wrong letter, big B = Byte, little b = bit

  12. #12
    You're looking at the wrong letter, big B = Byte, little b = bit
    Actually I corrected that too in my post. Both the m and b were wrong in his post though.

  13. #13
    So what is it supposed to look like then? Do some hosts try to screw you over by offering a host with 10 Mbits/sec instead of 10MB/sec?

    So if 10Mbits/sec = 3200 GB

    what does 10MB/sec = ?

  14. #14
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    Hosts don't specify network traffic in megabytes. They use megabits. Unless it's total throughput. Then it WILL be megabytes, or gigabytes. not mega or gigabit

    eg: 10mbps is megabits. 600mb monthly means megabytes
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  15. #15
    So it'll always look like 10Mbits/sec?

  16. #16
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  17. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by yagigain
    Yeah if it's a colo / dedicated service then it's pretty important to know if it is 10 m/bit capped or burstable. Burstable can get expensive on the 95th percentile if your get above 10 mbit often.

    Find out more about 95th percentile here,

    http://webdesign.about.com/od/colocation/a/aa012405.htm

    then when you've worked out how it is calculated you can come back and tell us all
    K lol, here it goes:

    It looks like although there is a benefit to the 95th percentile billing, I worry that I would be example 2. Because on a few of my sites I put up videos on various days. Those videos immediately get connected to and downloaded. Because of this, I would likely have 15 - 20 days of really heavy traffic (like when I get new videos posted) and then 10 - 15 days of lighter traffic. At the 95th percentile billing, although I'd be able to give faster download speeds on the heavy days, I would likely run into overage charges.

    However, if I did not go with the 95th percentile billing (that is burstable), then my users would likely run into slow download speeds.



    So basically I'm not sure what to do at this point. Any suggestions?

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