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  1. #1

    international bandwidth

    I think in almost all countries the international bandwidth links are quoted sepparated from national bandwidth. How is the case in USA? If i put a server in colo, the 10 Mbps the DC allowme ins national and international?.. so if i have 10 Mbps (in international link) here, in Argentina, i can up/download 10 Mbps to the server in USA?

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by ffedde
    I think in almost all countries the international bandwidth links are quoted sepparated from national bandwidth. How is the case in USA? If i put a server in colo, the 10 Mbps the DC allowme ins national and international?.. so if i have 10 Mbps (in international link) here, in Argentina, i can up/download 10 Mbps to the server in USA?
    I've mainly only seen this for Asian bandwidth (and that's for going to the US - anyways), I've never heard of 'international fees' for US bandwidth.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
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    In Argentina, if you have a good enough link to the United States, yes you can push 10 Mbps... I know there are some countries (for example: israel) that provide a full unmetered dedicated 100mbit port for like $60... but that is only within israel.. Anything outside Israel is like 10mbit. Hope this answers your question.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by FR-Alex
    In Argentina, if you have a good enough link to the United States, yes you can push 10 Mbps... I know there are some countries (for example: israel) that provide a full unmetered dedicated 100mbit port for like $60... but that is only within israel.. Anything outside Israel is like 10mbit. Hope this answers your question.
    I've never seen *that* before - and I'm there every year, pretty much.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
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    Yes, there's such a concept as "world transit" - it applies basically everywhere except the US. Essentially, companies in countries outside of the US buy smaller transit links and larger links to regionalized transit (and obviously peering), as most of their traffic stays within the same country. A good example would be Sweden or Belgium.

    In many of those countries, it's true that your throughput going out of the country will be lower, both because of latency as well as the expense of what many network operators in those countries term as "world transit". The links that providers in those countries buy to send their bits out of the country are simply smaller because they're more expensive. By contrast, there is not any such thing as "regional transit" in the US. So providers in the US don't really care where you want to send your bits - it costs us the same to transit bits to Texas, Argentina, or Africa.

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  6. #6
    Argentina and Brazil seem to have fairly good links. Most of the issues we see are from Asia.

  7. #7
    Thankyou to all for the responses!

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