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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    uk
    Posts
    448

    Lightbulb many httpd or just one?

    Would running a separate httpd deamon for each user on my server work well?

    I was thinking that way everything to do with each user is kept separate, and mean that php scripts cant mess with other people stuff and it doesnt break things like phpsuexec does.

    I wouldnt necessery use apache for httpd daemons more likly a lighter daemon such as lighttpd...

    implementation issues aside. I know this can be done and i know how to do it.

    I wanna know is it a good idea, and would it scale? Has anyone ever tried it before

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    uk
    Posts
    448
    guess i shall have to try it

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    San Jose, CA.
    Posts
    1,622
    I would take it a step further and just sell off VPSs if providing customized solutions is your goal.

    If you're doing it to try and provide a more secure system... I'd rethink that plan.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    uk
    Posts
    448
    im really trying to find an alternative to phpsuexec, that doesnt break popular php scripts, but one that still makes user scripts run with user permissions.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Vancouver
    Posts
    2,416
    Doing what you are proposing, with a lightweight httpd such as lighttpd, certainly will give you user based enhanced security and help with overall system stability (one users screw-ups don't affect all). Whether it works from a resource perspective depends on how many individual users = # of lighttpd instances * (x * php instances) you'll end up running.

    In addition you'll be positioned to give users much more control over using the httpd daemon, which might be helpful if you plan on offering services for other web apps, i.e. front-ending other web application stacks such as django or TurboGears (python) or Rails (ruby).

    I'm currently using shared lighttpd for most users; and a separate lighttpd for specific users and needs. So far my experience with lighttpd has been very good - I've no intention on bringing Apache back for general purpose use. For a simple replacement of Apache (not what you are proposing), lighttpd is most definitely a lighter weight solution.
    “Even those who arrange and design shrubberies are under
    considerable economic stress at this period in history.”

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    uk
    Posts
    448
    thats just the kinda thing i was thinking of. I shall give it a try!

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