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Thread: Being hired?

  1. #1

    Being hired?

    Is there any requirements that I have to reach to be hired by a hosting company?
    I'm pretty quick at learning how to do things on the web or comp.I'm experienced with features in the reseller.Like what positions would their be available?

    Any advice?links?

  2. #2
    That would really depend on what experience you have. If you have a limited understanding of the hosting industry, then you could probably expect an affiliate position at the most.

    This also might be better suited in the employment requests forum or lounge.
    FrogJumper.com, Superb Cpanel Web Hosting.
    Excellent, High Paying Affiliate Program.

  3. #3
    Thats not really what I'm asking,I'm asking how is it done to run a hosting company.What is needed to know to help run a hosting company?

  4. #4
    A lot of good research here on WHT and a lot of education, at least to be successful.
    FrogJumper.com, Superb Cpanel Web Hosting.
    Excellent, High Paying Affiliate Program.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
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    In canada
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    Quote Originally Posted by goodydomains
    A lot of good research here on WHT and a lot of education, at least to be successful.

    Just to add to that , lots of contacts and good budget and keen interest and sharp mind.

    Regards

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
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    Atlanta, GA
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    yeah, deep pockets are always a big plus in any industry as well as a nice fat rolodex.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Amsterdam/Rotterdam, NL
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    2,085
    I think these are pretty much the basic requirements:

    - a lot of patience
    - in-depth knowledge about linux (or windows/solaris/etc depending what the company uses)
    - basic knowledge about networking
    - customer relations and PR
    - a new idea. Unless you are going to offer something new, you're not really going to stand a chance against all the established competition

  8. #8
    You gotta be good with WHM.

  9. #9
    Im already experienced with WHM.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Internet
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    1,324
    You need to give top priority to the customer satisfaction. Beacuse keeping the existing customers is tougher than getting new ones.

  11. #11
    True that. As somebody who has been scraped and bruised by hosts in the past, I'd gladly pay a company that would just treat me like a human being for once. The customer isn't always right, but at least listen to what they have to say.
    Ron Burke
    Director of GamingTrend.com

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    In canada
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    3,211
    Quote Originally Posted by Ron Burke
    True that. As somebody who has been scraped and bruised by hosts in the past, I'd gladly pay a company that would just treat me like a human being for once. The customer isn't always right, but at least listen to what they have to say.
    Hmm i listed to what customers say even help them out setting their scripts and other things on their accounts ? is that called being treated as human even do some jokes and stuff

  13. #13
    I found that companies are willing to train you if you sign a contract that you won't leave for --- so long.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    3,075
    A big part of the equation is how serious are you about this. If you are some young teenager looking for a few dollars or a college student needing some decent cash you have different options. A lot of small hosting companies give you a free reseller and maybe some money.... That being said there are plenty out there that pay a real living wage, it depends on your time comitment, experience, and some luck.
    John W, CISSP, C|EH
    MS Information Security and Assurance
    ITEagleEye.com - Server Administration and Security
    Yawig.com - Managed VPS and Dedicated Servers with VIP Service

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by paidhosting
    Just to add to that , lots of contacts and good budget and keen interest and sharp mind.

    Regards
    I may have to disagree with you on the "lots of contracts" part. Contracts are usually a big way for customers to be cheap. For example, in the technical services industry, you might get between $40 to $160 an hour for your work. But if you do a contract all of a sudden you are working twice as hard for one-third of the price.

    Depends what kind of contract but for the most part there is no benefit to your average consumer EXCEPT they get more work done, for less money. Businesses on the other hand can benefit from contracts because they don't want to be easily ditched and have it disrupt 'their flow'.

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