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  1. #1

    Is There Any Restriction In Non American Registering .US TLD?

    Hi,

    I tried to register a .eu domain name but my registrar says my address is non EU address so I cannot register .eu extension of my domain name.

    I would like to register .us of my domain name. I already have .com and .net.

    Can a non American not living in USA and have no business whatsoever in America register .us domain name?

    Do you need a US address in order to register .us?

    If it is not allowed I think it is unfair because non-Tuvalian can register .tv.


    Thank you for answering.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    4,202
    You need to be a US citizen or resident to get a .US extension.
    With a population of only 11,600 persons and a limited potential for domestic sales Tuvalu decided to make some money off their .tv extension.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by koushibasaki
    I think it is unfair
    So's life.

    Anyway, anyone who can prove a bonafide US-based presence can register for a
    .us domain name. Just be prepared to prove such if ever asked to do so.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    1,898
    ccTLDs belong to a country's Local Internet Community (LIC).

    It's up the LIC what they do with their ccTLD. If they want to restrict its use to residents of their country that's up to them. If they want to turn it into a pretend-GTLD and flog it around the world that's up to them too. It's not for people outside the country to judge whether this is unfair or notl (Personally I think it's unfair that US citizens can enter my country by just waving their passport and that I have to fill in forms and get fingerprinted to enter theirs... but I accept that it's up to our respective governments to set entry requirements!)

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Cambridge, UK
    Posts
    469
    In an ideal world people wouldn't be able to get hold of domains they weren't supposed to have.
    As has been said above, the .us domains are restricted to people in or who have a base in the US.
    However I know of at least two people here in the UK that are just UK people, have nothing to do with the US yet have .us domains.

    For a .eu you need to live in the .eu and at the moment you need to be a business as we are currently going through a Sunrise phase for the allocation of .eu domains - I believe we are on stage two where business can register trademarks etc.

    It really is fair - every country is entitled to do what they like with ther domain extensions.
    The US have decided to make their country code available to locals only.
    .eu is for people in the EU.
    co.uk for example is an extension from here in the UK - however Nominet have decided to allow unrestricted access to it and anybody can buy one.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Toronto, Canada
    Posts
    132
    Quote Originally Posted by Lubeca
    ccTLDs belong to a country's Local Internet Community (LIC).

    It's up the LIC what they do with their ccTLD. If they want to restrict its use to residents of their country that's up to them. If they want to turn it into a pretend-GTLD and flog it around the world that's up to them too. It's not for people outside the country to judge whether this is unfair or notl (Personally I think it's unfair that US citizens can enter my country by just waving their passport and that I have to fill in forms and get fingerprinted to enter theirs... but I accept that it's up to our respective governments to set entry requirements!)
    lol, interesting point about passport entries and good information about LIC, didn't know that.

    Cheers

    Ray


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    5,400
    I think the url for us use to be www.nic.us, they shed more light on policies and restrictions
    Domain Maven

  8. #8
    Yes, domain names are a fickle thing, depending on the TLD.

    Some registrars say that the nameservers for .us domains must be physically in the U.S. 1 and 1 makes you tick a box that verfies you agree to that.

    We try to stay away from some TLDs because of the legalities involved. For example, we hold 3 .co.uk domains right now and are trying to sell them off. It's not likely anyone's going to be interested in them, but to avoid any possible issues, we park the domains on the registrar's servers in the U.K. and point it to our sale page. This, while we muddle through the Nominet requirements.

    Most other TLDs are a lot less headache and hassle; .com, .org, .net, and even .info. They're the easy ones. Getting into specialty ones, such as .name, .biz, and country TLDs can (not always) cause more headaches, at least from the standpoint of our niche in the market.

    But it is good to have rules for some TLDs, so that a .us domain is indeed available for a US citizen, and that not just anyone can get a .gov domain, or heaven forbid a .mil domain. If a private citizen was somehow able to attain ownership/control of such a domain, I'd either admire their bravery, or question their sanity.

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