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  1. #1
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    Bandwidth question

    I am new to colocation and bandwidth. I normally see hosts giving 1000gb of bandwidth per month. I am looking to colo a server and see many use mbit. How do you covert that to gb/month. Also what does unmetered mean compaired to metered?

    Joseph

  2. #2
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    Here is a handly little tool to use. It will convert both ways.
    http://www.crnc.net/network/bandwidthconversion/
    courtesy of the nice fellows at crnc.

  3. #3
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    thanks. Does anyone have an explination why? I am more intrested in the math of it.

    Joseph

  4. #4
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    I mostly think some companies use it, cuzz it makes you guess more, or it space on the website.

    Really, the math is basicly like this:

    #of Mbits X 364 = #of GBS. But becareful about that becuse some companies only do 300 and not 364. So really you should ask sales about how much a Mbit is worth in Gigibytes, or else you could calculate ur self wrong.

    As far as companies used Unmerted, its basicly where your not capped off to a certain amount of GB. Most servers use 1000-2000 GBS on average so companies do not have to worry about it.

    But where msot companies get ya is how they cap off your speed to the network, or they oversell their network resource to where you get the speed of 100-300 kbs. ITs anther thing to watch out for is the speed on servers.

    maybe that helps you!

  5. #5
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    That does help. Thanks a lot.

    If it is unmetered why do they have like 10mbit unmetered and other speeds?

  6. #6
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    Good Question, it makes no sense lol

  7. #7
    Hosts giving 1000-2000GB/month are usually offering dedicated servers. They bank on the fact that the majority of their clients will not even come close to the 1000-2000GB/month so technically, it can be considered overselling in a sense.

    Colocation tends to be more geared towards those who know what they will use so it tends to be a bit more pricey for bandwidth, when compared to those of dedicated servers. Because colocation clients tend to know what they will need, they will most likely use most of what they purchased.

    Unmetered usually means that you will be capped at a certain speed, and you can transfer at that speed constantly with no overages (since you are capped). Different speeds just means different speed caps. 10Mbit unmetered is usually capped to 10Mbps, 100Mbit unmeterd is usually capped to 100Mbps, etc. Some hosts offer 10Mbps unmetered and may not cap you at a certain speed, but you will need to keep in mind that you may have to pay overage charges if you burst past 10Mbps enough in terms of usage or amount of time, depending on their billing method (flat out per Mbit, 95th percentile, etc.).

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by RootDet
    #of Mbits X 364 = #of GBS. But becareful about that becuse some companies only do 300 and not 364. So really you should ask sales about how much a Mbit is worth in Gigibytes, or else you could calculate ur self wrong.
    What? Companies can't arbitrarily choose how many GBs are in a Mbps.

    1Mbps = 125KB/s. Multiply that by the number of seconds in a month (about 2592000), and you get approximately 324GB/month as a maximum data transfer. Realize also that this is a maximum, before even taking into account network overhead and also inefficiency from idle periods where you're not maxing out the pipe. In real life (for web serving), you'll probably see about 200GB/month per 1 Mbps.

    Also, co-location companies bill in Mbps because that is the standard, and it's also how the co-location companies themselves are billed. Per-GB billing was invented as a way to allow the common non-technical person to more easily understand their usage requirements.
    Scott Burns, President
    BQ Internet Corporation
    Remote Rsync and FTP backup solutions
    *** http://www.bqbackup.com/ ***

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by bqinternet
    What? Companies can't arbitrarily choose how many GBs are in a Mbps.
    No, but many colocation providers charge bandwidth on a 95%tile scale for various reasons. It benefits both you and them in different ways. Based on 5 minute samples, you'd get 3 hours per month where you can pull 100Mbps (for sake of example) but after the samples are ordered and they take the 95%tile sample it may only be 3Mbps. This allows you to afford for spikes without being killed with charges. Similarlly, what if a bunch of users spiked at the same time and didn't come close to using their bandwidth alloment, it would end up costing the provider. Hope that kind of explains it.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by lpmusic
    It benefits both you and them in different ways. Based on 5 minute samples, you'd get 3 hours per month where you can pull 100Mbps (for sake of example) but after the samples are ordered and they take the 95%tile sample it may only be 3Mbps.
    Just to clarify, 95th percentile billing allows you to spike for 36 hours without being billed.
    Scott Burns, President
    BQ Internet Corporation
    Remote Rsync and FTP backup solutions
    *** http://www.bqbackup.com/ ***

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by bqinternet
    Just to clarify, 95th percentile billing allows you to spike for 36 hours without being billed.
    Hmm. I guess i'll check my math
    Edit: What'cha know, guess I dropped a digit there
    Last edited by lpmusic; 12-04-2005 at 03:45 AM.

  12. #12
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    Also, this may be a stupid thing to add on but if anyone didnt know how 1mbit per second converted into 125 kilobytes per second... There are 8 bits to a byte, so one megabit is 1000 kilobits - Divide that 1000 by 8 and you have 125 kilobytes.

  13. #13
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    Unmetered means you can have as much bandwidth as they can take. Metered is they tell you how much bandwidth you can have!

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