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  1. #1
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    College question

    What college should I go to? Trade school please I want to learn about networks, system administrator, some stuff like that. I dont know what school to go to. I was told ITT-Tech sucks. I need something in either so. California or Arizona.

  2. #2
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    I would recommend against a trade school... sure it sounds good since it takes less time, but the pay off is not as good in the long run.

  3. #3
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    My grades are not good enough to go to a regular college.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by esh
    I would recommend against a trade school... sure it sounds good since it takes less time, but the pay off is not as good in the long run.
    I don't know about that. Trades schools seems to be all the rage nowadays, especially in Canada. Considering somewhere around 80% of students that graduate from University work in a field that's unrelated to their studies. Trade jobs are high in demand, aswell.
    Can you be scared half to death twice?

  5. #5
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    If you don't have the grades to go directly to a University, start out at a community college and then transfer.

    I wouldn't recommend Trade Schools.
    University Students still have an advantage over trade school students.
    At a trade school you only learn about a single thing. While at a University you learn about many more things than just a specific trade.

  6. #6
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    As eman said, start in a community college then transfer...

    But also trade school might be good if you live in large cities (ny,ect..)..

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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by E_man3
    If you don't have the grades to go directly to a University, start out at a community college and then transfer.

    I wouldn't recommend Trade Schools.
    University Students still have an advantage over trade school students.
    At a trade school you only learn about a single thing. While at a University you learn about many more things than just a specific trade.


    You can do the same thing with a college degree but it gives you the benefit of greater options later in life. Increasingly network admin is becoming a commodity flooded by people who can go to trade schools to get certified. Salaries have already gone down considerably in the last 7-8 years and will continue to be squeezed.
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  8. #8
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    I think I need a 2.0 to go to a community college.

  9. #9
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    Actually to attend community college you just need to have a high school diploma. There is no specific gpa requirement for attending community college.

  10. #10
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    What type of trade school are you looking at. I used to use ITT to hire jr CAD drafters. However most of the people did have much knowledge and no concept of how to use the skills in a business manner.

    Then there is the pay issue. The trade schools like to tell you that has a CAD tech you can make up to $60,000. What they forget to mention is the only CAD techs making that money have a four year to back up the CAD skills.

  11. #11
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    Anything to do with computers or IT is oversaturated, you won't find a well-paying job in it. However there's tons of trades that still bring home bacon.

    In an article that was in the newspaper here about a year ago featured a young man in his mid 20s making $120,000/year, and he's a welder. Construction is booming here, and so is the trade craft market.
    Can you be scared half to death twice?

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by fromage
    Anything to do with computers or IT is oversaturated, you won't find a well-paying job in it. However there's tons of trades that still bring home bacon.

    In an article that was in the newspaper here about a year ago featured a young man in his mid 20s making $120,000/year, and he's a welder. Construction is booming here, and so is the trade craft market.
    Untrue!

    I just read an article that said from 1998-2008 you will see the following. Granted it is a tad bit old, but I have heard no reports if it slowing down...

    108% growth for Computer Engineers
    102% growth for Computer Support Specialists
    94% growth for System Analysts
    77% growth for Database Administrators

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Odd Fact
    What type of trade school are you looking at. I used to use ITT to hire jr CAD drafters. However most of the people did have much knowledge and no concept of how to use the skills in a business manner.

    Then there is the pay issue. The trade schools like to tell you that has a CAD tech you can make up to $60,000. What they forget to mention is the only CAD techs making that money have a four year to back up the CAD skills.
    Im not exactly sure yet but something in the computer industry. I would like to work in a data-center

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by RandyT
    What college should I go to? Trade school please I want to learn about networks, system administrator, some stuff like that. I dont know what school to go to. I was told ITT-Tech sucks. I need something in either so. California or Arizona.

    I graduated from DeVry University in 1996, went to work and have never looked back. Straight out of school I went to work for MCI as a programmer/analyst. Since then I have worked for a number of Fortune 500 companies. Once you have experience, then the actual degree becomes less and less of a requirement.

    Good luck!
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  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by DataDork
    Once you have experience, then the actual degree becomes less and less of a requirement.
    I'd like to second the importance of real world experience. Trade schools will give you what you want right away and with a little work on your own you will have a very valuable skill set. It's great to show that you are trainable by doing well at a 4 year university, but I know way too many friends/family that go to college and can find nothing with just their degree.

    Get an internship ASAP is my advice.
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  16. #16
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    Thanks for the advice schmeg007, I will probably do an internship while in college. I just have to make sure I have enough money to keep going thru college

  17. #17
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    I did an A+ class at BU when I was 21 and it got my foot in the door at some places and while it was not making 100k a year 30-40k for entry level is not bad and it usually only goes up from there.

    You also need to figure out what you want to do, Windows admin, Linux Admin, VOIP/Networking, programming etc.. Windows techs/admins seem to be the most saturated at this time.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by phpcoder
    Untrue!

    I just read an article that said from 1998-2008 you will see the following. Granted it is a tad bit old, but I have heard no reports if it slowing down...

    108% growth for Computer Engineers
    102% growth for Computer Support Specialists
    94% growth for System Analysts
    77% growth for Database Administrators
    I was talking about in Canada. There's jack**** available for IT/Comp. Sci students.
    Can you be scared half to death twice?

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by DataDork
    I graduated from DeVry University in 1996, went to work and have never looked back. Straight out of school I went to work for MCI as a programmer/analyst. Since then I have worked for a number of Fortune 500 companies. Once you have experience, then the actual degree becomes less and less of a requirement.

    Good luck!
    I'm not one to throw out babies and the bathwater when it comes to pros and cons. There is some truth to the above. I would just state that I live overseas and there are a ton of eager people from Japan, India, Phillipines, Tawain, ..., that are getting the experience and, in many cases, getting rigorous Computer Science Degrees too.

    Is the market flooded? Not yet but it is certainly nothing like it used to be. In 1996, I remember young Marines getting out of the Marine Corps with very little education but 2-3 years experience in networking. They were being grabbed up by $80K-$100K salaries. Such skills are not such a "black art" as they once were as many have jumped into that market.

    Experience certainly plays a pivotal role but my main concern for a person who does not pursue a degree are options later in life. Experience is great if you intend to remain in the same work for the rest of your life but, if it gets saturated later and wages continue to depress, or you just decide you don't like the line of work, it is harder to pull chocks and go into another line of work where one's experience makes no difference.

    It's not a matter of devaluing the line of work or the intelligence or creativity of those who really excel in IT. They are smart and hard-working. Helicopter pilots are a perfect example. It is a very technical and difficult job but the U.S. Army has the largest Air Force in the world with all its helicopters and its Warrant Officer literally flood the market with very experienced and capable pilots. The high supply of pilots means that wages are low for what most would think would command a very high salary.

    As generic advice goes there are always exceptions but I generally would recommend to any young person to get their college degree. It's all about options because, like it or not, some jobs will not even allow you to apply without a college degree.
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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by OKI-Paul
    I did an A+ class at BU when I was 21 and it got my foot in the door at some places and while it was not making 100k a year 30-40k for entry level is not bad and it usually only goes up from there.

    You also need to figure out what you want to do, Windows admin, Linux Admin, VOIP/Networking, programming etc.. Windows techs/admins seem to be the most saturated at this time.
    Do you think its a good idea to get an A+? I am in ROP IT Essentials at the moment and I have a chance to get my A+ certification.

  21. #21
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    Businesses have been complaining about the lack of competent IT employees and that there is actually a shortage right now, at least in the US of A.

    On a side note, I would reccomend against a trade school such as ITT. If you're border line for a college acceptance, my suggestion would be to apply for a major in liberal arts or an associates or something, and then transfer majors once you show them what you're made of. With ITT Tech, you not as "adaptable" as you would be with a degree from a university. It opens up more doors by doing different things, and exposes you to different stuff. I do however believe that "street smarts" far exceed "academic smarts" and thus believe you should gain as much experience as possible.

    A student from the highschool I attend, did a Cisco Networking Academy class in highschool, got his CCNA when he was done. Attended a private university for 4 years, and now has a job in NYC with JP Morgan, starting pay is $70k/year working in IT.

    Best of luck to you, I am going through the whole college thing now, and will be attending a private university

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by JHServers
    Businesses have been complaining about the lack of competent IT employees and that there is actually a shortage right now, at least in the US of A.

    On a side note, I would reccomend against a trade school such as ITT. If you're border line for a college acceptance, my suggestion would be to apply for a major in liberal arts or an associates or something, and then transfer majors once you show them what you're made of. With ITT Tech, you not as "adaptable" as you would be with a degree from a university. It opens up more doors by doing different things, and exposes you to different stuff. I do however believe that "street smarts" far exceed "academic smarts" and thus believe you should gain as much experience as possible.

    A student from the highschool I attend, did a Cisco Networking Academy class in highschool, got his CCNA when he was done. Attended a private university for 4 years, and now has a job in NYC with JP Morgan, starting pay is $70k/year working in IT.

    Best of luck to you, I am going through the whole college thing now, and will be attending a private university
    Thanks for the advice Frank, but I dont think I'm close enough to the border for going to college. The class I'm enrolled in also teaches Cisco Networking, but its really boring.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by RandyT
    Thanks for the advice Frank, but I dont think I'm close enough to the border for going to college. The class I'm enrolled in also teaches Cisco Networking, but its really boring.
    If you don't mind sharing... what are your grades like and how did you perform on the SAT's?

    P.S. I am taking Cisco Certified Networking Academy classes too. I finished CCNA 1 and CCNA 2, and am now working on CCNA 3 and soon 4, which will then leave me with nothing to do but take the CCNA exam

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by JHServers
    If you don't mind sharing... what are your grades like and how did you perform on the SAT's?

    P.S. I am taking Cisco Certified Networking Academy classes too. I finished CCNA 1 and CCNA 2, and am now working on CCNA 3 and soon 4, which will then leave me with nothing to do but take the CCNA exam
    Uhm 1.6 I believe and I havnt taken the SATs

  25. #25
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    Your best bet is more than likely going to be a community college. Any larger or private university isn't going to take a risk with your low GPA. Going to a community college will save you money, allow you to get used to the college enviroment, and get a 2nd chance at going to a more reputable university.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by inogenius
    Your best bet is more than likely going to be a community college. Any larger or private university isn't going to take a risk with your low GPA. Going to a community college will save you money, allow you to get used to the college enviroment, and get a 2nd chance at going to a more reputable university.
    So do you suggest going to a regular college over trade schools? If there was no cost which one would you choose?

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by RandyT
    So do you suggest going to a regular college over trade schools? If there was no cost which one would you choose?
    I would suggest going to a community college for a year (maybe two if you need it) and then transfer to a private university for a bachelor's.

  28. #28
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    Any suggestion on any colleges around me? *I live in Southern California*

  29. #29
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    I am going to the itt tech for associate's in multimedia. I chose itt over community for many reasons. One would be it's not hands on and it doesn't teach me what I don't need. In community college, classes are pathetic imo. There is basically nothing that would interest you and teach you about your field. In itt, there is introduction to programming, flash class, javascript class, drafting classes, etc. While I do not believe multimedia is actually an IT degree, Itt was imo the best school to offer a such degree. It is a bit pricey, but really after loans and such, it's not much to pay off $150/mo or so to repay for the education. After Im done with these 2 years, Im planning on transferring if I can to another school for 2 more years as game developer and digital designer. One school I have in mind is Academy of Art university. Another reason I dislike community colleges is because they're like a second high school. But for IT degree, there are too many colleges. For art degrees or such, it's impossible to find something. ITT is like one out of 2 schools near me that offer multimedia/game design/art degree. Even state colleges and universities do not have these degrees. So I guess if you want to go to community college, make sure they have classes that will interest you somehow. Boring classes will make your education boring and you will want to drop out. ITT classes are pretty fun, they're hands on, which means you'll learn alot basically from doing it. They don't have much homework or paperwork. Im just done with my first quarter and i had a pc repair class. Even though I knew most things about pc repair, the class was alot better than what I imagined. We basically each had out own pc, we could do whatever we want with it, and nobody will jump on your back if you break something. So it's basically a worry free school. Now about jobs after itt competition? I don't know, There is a purina headquarters here, so I might apply as a graphic artist there when Im done. Or maybe local tv stations also. Basically just choose what you want to do, and where you want to go. Be confident in yourself and your choices. If you're good and have basically any degree, im sure you'll find a good job sooner or later. I mean many employees just want to see people have education. They don't care where it was from. What they want the most is experience and knowledge.
    Last edited by WHTer; 11-21-2005 at 08:04 PM.
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  30. #30
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    How much are classes there? Im looking to spend under $30k/year because of high housing cost : /

  31. #31
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    My 2 year degree will be $37,000. I did qualify for about $8000 of government aid so I will have to repay about $29,000. And basically I have 10 years to repay that. And it starts 6 months after I graduate. It's pretty expensive compared to community colleges where you can attend for like $12,000 for 2 years. But really community college degree is a big joke if you don't plan on going to a better college or university. ITT's degree is weaker than university's but alot better than community college's. At least I think so.
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  32. #32
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    So basically its about $18,500/year? Not bad I thought it would have been more. I dont know what to take though. Any suggestions? I want to work for a data center so yeah

  33. #33
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    Well they offer CNS (Computer Network Systems) degree which sounds something a person would need to work either in a datacenter, or a company that needs someone to manage the network. But being a network specialist, or something similar, wont exactly mean you would get a job at a data center. Network specialists are needed in schools, government facilities, large corporations and companies, etc... You'll have a bigger chance of going to ITT tech and getting a "data center" (networking) job than community college. If you think ITT is good for you, then go for it. If you think it wont be good, then don't. But basically don't go anywhere you don't want to go. Being bored in college is worst thing that could happen if their classes aren't good. Because if you start being bored, you wont take it seriously and you wont even learn anything.
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  34. #34
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    My 4 yr University degree will cost ~$18,000 + ~$4,000 in books

    oh and this university was a community college about 10 years ago, but lately has exploded and is the 3rd largest university in my state

  35. #35
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    The total for my college of choice is approx $28,000 per year including room and board, before any financial aid (which I dont think i'll qualify for) and before any scholarships. I also get the benefit of the tuition exchange program if I can find someone to properly exchange with. This would make my tuition be 100% free, and just have to pay for room and board. It all depends on where you go though, community colleges will be significantly cheaper, and state schools will be cheaper than private universities.

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