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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    berkeley
    Posts
    81

    * Determining CPU/RAM needs?

    (I have tried searching on this but I cannot seem to find this seemingly obvious newbie question.)

    So I just had a serious problem with my shared hosting account. They are working on the problem, but the lack of communication is the real issue for me. Anyway it is time for me to move on.

    I have been considering a dedicated host and now have been reading up on VPS. But I am stuck on figuring out what kind of power I really need.

    What I will need to host (projecting into the future a little bit) is about 20-40 blogs and a message board or 2. Probably we are talking up to 1000-2000 uniques a day.

    Add to this:

    I will also have the opportunity to host a friends cms based softcore site that will be somewhat bandwidth intensive and somewhat busy - but I do not have estimates for that...

    But anyway, my question is how do I go about deciding what cpu and ram specs I really need with this kind of hosting? How do CPU/RAM specs work on a VPS system?

    (I am kind of newbie to this, so let me know if there are things that I am not considering here.)

    Thanks ;-)

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    HK
    Posts
    3,076

    Smile

    CPU & RAM are shared among all the VPS on a server, but you'll get larger chunks than what you are getting with shared hosting ~

    I think you should start with a VPS, unless you actually find out that need more power to run your sites, you can upgrade to a dedicated server ~

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    New York, NY
    Posts
    10,574
    VPSes are very scalable I know both ServInt and PowerVPS offer a way for you to upgrade to a "VZ Dedicated Machine" which has only 1 VPS on it (yours). All upgrades on a VPS can be done with little to no downtime so a VPS may be best. You can start out with a small package and upgrade as you go along .
    MediaLayer, LLC - www.medialayer.com Learn how we can make your website load faster, translating to better conversion rates for your business!
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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    California
    Posts
    132
    Also you want to make sure that whatever solution you choose comes with plenty of support and management. Many dedicated server providers out there don't provide real hands-on support. And for someone who doesn't want to, or doesn't know how to, fully secure and manage their own server they would want to be careful about that.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    berkeley
    Posts
    81
    A VPS seems like a good way to go.

    My needs will be growing slowly over the new few months, so being able to piecewise upgrade would be perfect. If I do host my friends site there may be a spike in needs, so maybe then I can go to dedicated.

    How does one determine how much CPU usage your VPS will be able to use? I assume a VPS has some sort of quality of service mechanism for the CPU. I see things like, "Equal share CPU" or no mention of the CPU at all. How is the CPU spec'ed for a VPS?

    If you have any more VPS provider suggestions I am all ears. So far I have looked at, SolarVPS, PowerVPS, ServInt and LayeredTech.

    I do administer a Linux server at my day job, so I don't have to have a managed solution, but it would probably be for the best.

    Thanks for the info!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    California
    Posts
    132
    If you want to make life easy, may I highly reccomend LiquidWeb (http://www.liquidweb.com/) there is no better support out there.
    Last edited by RackPoint-Andrew; 10-12-2005 at 09:21 PM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    9,852
    I second ServInt for VPS.
    Best in the business as far as I'm concerned.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    New York, NY
    Posts
    10,574
    I'm currently using PowerVPS and they seem to let you use more CPU than ServInt does, or I do atleast feel a performance difference as PowerVPS uses mostly AMD machines which are faster.
    MediaLayer, LLC - www.medialayer.com Learn how we can make your website load faster, translating to better conversion rates for your business!
    The pioneers of optimized web hosting, featuring LiteSpeed Web Server & SSD Storage - Celebrating 10 Years in Business

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    berkeley
    Posts
    81

    Re: Determining CPU/RAM needs?

    So I just signed up for Servint VPS after reading a lot of reviews here and comparing the different options.

    We will see how it goes I guess

    Thanks for everyones advice.

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