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  1. #1

    Which AMD mobo (SATA RAID, 1000/100Mbit eth)

    So, which AMD mobo with the following set of features would you recommend:
    • Supports SATA RAID
    • Has integrated 1000/100mbit ethernet port(s)
    • Has good Linux support (RAID and ethernet working flawlessly)


    This is meant for a 'starter' server that's gonna host a few smaller sites so I can't really afford an expensive Opteron CPU + TYAN mobo combination.
    Last edited by Chiyo-Chan; 08-06-2005 at 12:02 PM.
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  2. #2
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    might want to go dedicated instead of colo if you are just getting into this segment. Tyan has some good offereing and so does MSI, do you need 1u compatible or is that not an issue

  3. #3
    Actually I'm going to colocate a regular ATX box for now (I know someone in a DC) and I'll switch to a 2U rack when the need arises.

    I thought about dedicated but I'd rather go with my own box...
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  4. #4
    What Amd cpu do you want and you said your going to put this into a regular tower?

  5. #5
    Yup, regular ATX tower. I'll probably put in Athlon64 3000+, 2x 512MB 400Mhz and 2x 200GB SATA Seagate in RAID1.
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  6. if just for tower case, take a look at Gigabyte K8VM800M, then add a Intel gigabit NIC for about $40.

    all on-board SATA ports available out there are not 'real' hardware RAID. they may have some BIOS level software RAID for windows, but for linux, you can only implement OS software RAID1.

    to date, 3ware 8006-2LP is still THE only 2-channel SATA hardware RAID1 card out there. it's rather over-priced because lack of competition.

  7. #7
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    Originally posted by [email protected]


    all on-board SATA ports available out there are not 'real' hardware RAID. they may have some BIOS level software RAID for windows........
    I'm not sure why you refer to built in RAID on mobo chipsets as "software" raid. Even the 3Ware card you mentions requires a driver just like the ones built into the motherboards.

    I would like a more detailed explanation of your point of view on what "software" raid is vs "hardware" raid.
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  8. right, both software and hardware RAID require driver. however, software RAID use system CPU to do RAID processing, but hardware RAID comes with dedicated RAID processor on controller to do nothing else but RAID processing, therefore system CPU is free up for the real computing business.

    some go as far as calling those on-board RAID (Intel ICH5R/6R, Silicon Image 3112/14, Promise) as 'fake' RAID.

  9. #9
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    Originally posted by [email protected]
    right, both software and hardware RAID require driver. however, software RAID use system CPU to do RAID processing, but hardware RAID comes with dedicated RAID processor on controller to do nothing else but RAID processing, therefore system CPU is free up for the real computing business.

    some go as far as calling those on-board RAID (Intel ICH5R/6R, Silicon Image 3112/14, Promise) as 'fake' RAID.
    Yeah, I'm still not sold. Onboard video would be considered "fake video"

    I don't know as much about these things as I should, this is why I am probing. I'm not trying to be rude.

    I think we all know what classical software raid is. Windows has it, *nix has it, any motherboard can do it.

    I just figured that there was something else on the mobo that handled the task for raid enabled mobo's. At one time we benched a bunch of servers, some using 3ware cards, and others using Asus boards with onboard raid. I don't recall any significant difference in performance, or CPU utilization using IOMETER on windows.
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  10. I won't call video card 'fake' because like hardware RAID card, it comes with dedicated Video processor to do video things. your CPU doesn't do video processing at all.

    for linux, you don;t really have a choice, there is no kernel RAID driver whatsoever for all those on-board "RAID", not even the latest FC4/CentOS4/SuSe9.3/FreeBSD 5.4. instead, the on-board SATA ports are seen by kernel as non-RAID IDE controllers regardless how you set it up in system or RAID BIOS. the best you can do still is use Linux OS software RAID (md.o)

    right, today's CPUs are so fast, I guess it can spare some cycles to do RAID-1 processing under software RAID without hurting too much performance. but if you require RAID-5/10/50, on-board RAID just don't offer the options at all, partly because RAID-5/10/50 will use too much CPU cycles.

  11. #11
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    Originally posted by PSFServers
    Yeah, I'm still not sold. Onboard video would be considered "fake video"

    I don't know as much about these things as I should, this is why I am probing. I'm not trying to be rude.

    I think we all know what classical software raid is. Windows has it, *nix has it, any motherboard can do it.

    I just figured that there was something else on the mobo that handled the task for raid enabled mobo's. At one time we benched a bunch of servers, some using 3ware cards, and others using Asus boards with onboard raid. I don't recall any significant difference in performance, or CPU utilization using IOMETER on windows.
    Even if you didn't notice it, it's always a good idea to use a hardware raid solution. I never use raid 0 or 1 anyways, I always use raid 5. From what I've seen most boards do 0 or 1, so that puts them out from the get go.
    I wish all my traffic went through AS174.

  12. #12
    Hmm, I'm kind of confused now.

    I know that I only get 'true' hardware RAID with controllers like 3Ware that do the RAID processing themselves.

    Since I can't afford it, I'm going for software RAID - let it with by the motherboard itself or with a controller ala Promise, Adaptec, ... I don't really care as long as it works flawlessly under Linux (w/ md.o loaded) and is easy to setup.

    [email protected]: thanks for the suggestion but that mobo is not avaliable in my country, would a different model of Gigabyte still do? What's the reason you suggested this mobo - what do I need to look at when choosing it?

    Or would it be better to go for a SATA controller? These are the ones I can get here:
    - FastTrack 2200 RAID sata PCI RAID 0,1,10 controller
    - FastTrack150 TX2+ SATA RAID 0,1,10
    - PROMISE Fasttrak TX2200 2xSATA
    - Adaptec S-ATA RAID adapter, RAID 0, 1, 0/1 4 HD's AR1210SA
    - PrSata II 150TX4 S-ATA /ATA 133 PCI
    - PrSata II 150TX2-plus S-ATA /ATA 133 PCI
    -
    Last edited by Chiyo-Chan; 08-07-2005 at 06:29 AM.
    In the beginning the Universe was created.
    This has made a lot of people very angry and been widely regarded as a bad move.

  13. #13
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    Basically, hardware raid embedded in most motherboards isn't actually a separate peice of hardware. It is just a peice of software in the bios which emulates what a hardware card would do. In most cases (Windows) this works perfectly adequately, but as soon as you want something a bit more technical (Linux etc.) it falls over. Linux has difficulty reading from some hardware raid controllers (especially the MB kind).

    Anyway, OS software raid is often faster.
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  14. #14
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    Originally posted by Chiyo-Chan
    Since I can't afford it, I'm going for software RAID - let it with by the motherboard itself or with a controller ala Promise, Adaptec, ... I don't really care as long as it works flawlessly under Linux (w/ md.o loaded) and is easy to setup.
    Just read that bit, if you are using software raid I think i'm right in saying you don't need a raid controller as well.
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  15. #15

    Post

    The reason I am even thinking about this 'software' RAID controllers is that they might work better under Linux than RAID handled directly by a mobo...

    ... but I also may be way off track here

    Thats the reason I'm posting here [:
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  16. #16
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    I have a tyan s2882 and using it with Centos. I gave up on trying to do raid with it. Luckily I don't really need it. As even if you do setup some sort of software raid it still, I believe, will not be redundant. Most of what I read said that the /boot partition will not be setup via the raid1. Centos 4 won't even see a raid partition if you have set it up with your raid bios. Although windows saw it as raid just fine.

  17. #17
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    i recomend

    Supports SATA RAID

    Has integrated 1000/100mbit ethernet port(s)

    Has good Linux support (RAID and ethernet working flawlessly)

  18. #18
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    Look at http://www.webhostingtalk.com/showth...ight=sata+raid for some info on SATA RAID.

    Look at http://linux.yyz.us/sata/faq-sata-raid.html for info on Linux SATA RAID.

    Anyway, your choice of motherboard - any really. I like Asus ones, but Gigabyte have a good reputation too. I'd suggest you ignore nvidia chipset boards as nvidia does not provide hardware information to the linux developers.

    I'd also suggest you stick with software RAID until you need some performance, in which case, migrate to a proper raid card.

  19. #19
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    I want to learn more about SATA RAID too.

    From what is discussed here, it seems to tell whether a SATA RAID card is real HW based:
    1. If it supports only 0 and 1, it is software RAID. If it supports 5, it is hard RAID

    or

    2. If the RAID card is supported by Linux, it is most likely HW based.

    Is this correct?

  20. #20
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    No, I don't think you can draw any conclusions from the raid type supported.

    This link has a list of cards and their status. I'm not sure how up to date it is though.

    http://linuxmafia.com/faq/Hardware/sata.html

  21. #21
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    thanks for the link. it is very informational

  22. #22
    Yup, this thread is most helpful to me thx!
    In the beginning the Universe was created.
    This has made a lot of people very angry and been widely regarded as a bad move.

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