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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
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    673

    Access point vs Router

    What is the difference between an access point and a router when it comes to WLAN?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    The Shadows
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    2,913
    A access point will get you onto your "network" and won't have any advanced features, like a firewall, NAT, etc So you would only really be able to use one computer at a time, if you are using it for cable internet access.

    A router has advanced features like NAT, a firewall, DHCP, etc... Probably what you are looking for unless you are using it in a corperate envrioment which has dedicated machines to do these different tasks
    Dan Sheppard ~ Freelance whatever

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Roswell, GA
    Posts
    508
    think of an access point like a hub... it's the same as plugging an ethernet cable into a hub, but instead of an ethernet cable you are using wireless.

    a router routes :-p (ie. acts as a gateway (mainly) to your ISP, allowing multiple computers to access the ISP connection simultaneously.)

    So if you already have a wired router, and you simply need to connect a wireless laptop or some other wireless device, you can pickup an access point and plug it into the router to extend the network.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    673
    Thank you, now I know I need to buy a router.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    673
    can't edit any more

    But is it possible to connect 2 routers?

    1. My current ADSL router
    2. The new wireless router connected to the first router?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Miami, FL
    Posts
    3,262
    Originally posted by Johnburk
    can't edit any more

    But is it possible to connect 2 routers?

    1. My current ADSL router
    2. The new wireless router connected to the first router?
    You can turn a wireless router into an Access Point and connect it to an exist router.

    However, I'm going on a guess here and say you have a Westell Modem (or Speedsteam), in that case, you can easily put the modem in "bridge mode" and allow the router to handle the PPPOE requests, as well as assign DHCP IPs to each computer on your network. Plus it'll handle the wireless aspect.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    1,030
    Cascading routers usually is not a problem. Depending on the hardware, there could be a speed sacrifice when doing this.
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  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    1,082
    Originally posted by CybexHost
    Cascading routers usually is not a problem. Depending on the hardware, there could be a speed sacrifice when doing this.
    It's just silly and a bad idea. Multiple levels of NAT gets very hairy. Use access points if you already have all the routing capability you need. Or buy a router (because they're generally cheaper) and sacrifice a switch port for an uplink, then turn off DHCP, and you've got yourself an AP.

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