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  1. #1

    how 2 determine email server spec.

    How to determine email server hardware spec if number of user increment is like this:
    Y1 - 3,000
    Y2 - 30,000
    Y3 - 100,000
    Y4 - 190,000
    Y5 - 250,000
    Y6 - 320,000
    Y7 - 400,000
    Y8 - 500,000

    and every user will be given 10Mb each. user can assess email thru webmail or desktop application.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    226
    Here's a rough way to figure this out. You don't want to use servers over 3 years old, so let's only worry about 100k users.

    You really need SCSI drives in any important machine, especially one that's I/O intensive, like any mail server. Throw the webmail and mail access services on other machines, to split the load, and keep things running fast, as well as allow for maintenance. You can stop your webmail machine and upgrade OS or software and still receive mail on your incoming mail/storage machine.

    Start with 2 servers, put the fastest drives you can in the incoming mail server. CPU isn't really a big deal for such a machine, but I/O is. Mirrored SCSI drives are ideal. Good machines like HP Proliants are truly hot swap, unlike some more generic hardware, where the cages may be hot swap but the RAID controller isn't.

    Memory and CPU are important in webmail machines. Cheaper machines are passable for this. If you use the Maildir mail format for storage, the machines can chat over NFS without any problems.

    The slowest servers you can get are over 2GHz Xeon class, and should be fine for such an application. Tuning such systems will be important as the load increases, and you can always get more machines as the userbase increases, but two is a good start.
    Ken

    CROWHOST hosting+colocation services | 877-CROWHOST | support at crowhost.com
    Independent remote-hands serving all Chicago data centers

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    India
    Posts
    292
    Nice CROWHOST,
    You summerised it well ...and all that is necessary is there....
    The IMP thing noted ,putting Webmail on other machine which is a utmost necessary...and having good RAM ,n/w and CPU,Disk I/O and Tuning of IMAP ..for WebMail purpose is very very IMP..
    Otherwise...5,00,000 users accessing a single machine having all including Webmail....I think U can imagine...even 10000 users are the worst ...
    Anyway...it is good if you follow what CROWHOST he said..
    bye..
    thelinophile
    Thinking Different !!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    2,560
    i work on a system that has somewhere between 1.5 & 2 mil active mailusers

    we separate everything - the front ends (web, pop, imap), the storage, the mta's (we have separate "anti abuse" mta's first, which check things like whether a sender is on a spamlist, followed by a delivery mta which also carts the mail off to a different set of machines that do antivirus). we also have separate queue servers..

    now this might be a lot more than you'll use, but hte point is to have a efficient, stable system you should make sure you have a lot of redundancy - you'll get hardware failures, bugs, breakages etc. and so you want to be able to handle each of these. splitting the processes onto different machines will allow you to tune the machines to specific needs as well

    oh, and pick an os that can handle it!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Hong Kong
    Posts
    417
    Originally posted by Slidey
    i work on a system that has somewhere between 1.5 & 2 mil active mailusers

    we separate everything - the front ends (web, pop, imap), the storage, the mta's (we have separate "anti abuse" mta's first, which check things like whether a sender is on a spamlist, followed by a delivery mta which also carts the mail off to a different set of machines that do antivirus). we also have separate queue servers..

    now this might be a lot more than you'll use, but hte point is to have a efficient, stable system you should make sure you have a lot of redundancy - you'll get hardware failures, bugs, breakages etc. and so you want to be able to handle each of these. splitting the processes onto different machines will allow you to tune the machines to specific needs as well

    oh, and pick an os that can handle it!
    hello Slidey,

    just curious to know, for a 1.5&2mil active email user base, how many incoming you get per/sec

    thanks

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    2,560
    couldnt tell you per sec, but the last stats were around 30mill emails a day, of which 18mill were dropped

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Hong Kong
    Posts
    417
    thanks

    i believe those 18mil are dropped at connection level? (before EHELO/HELO)

    it may still reach 1,000+ per/sec in peak hours

    since i'm not yet able to work for a project w/ such user base, your figure really enrich my knowledge

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    2,560
    mostly dropped by realtime blacklists (ie sorbs/spamhaus) and the like, but some internal blacklists with domains/ips.

  9. #9
    Hi Slidey,

    Can you share with us exact or details specification of your servers and connectivity ?

    Or better, if you can give me some hints where to look for more details on this.

    Thanks

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