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  1. #1
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    Has the hosting industry peaked?

    I was talking with a client this morning, who brought up an interesting point: Has the hosting industry reached its peak?

    The industry is relatively new -- it has little regulation, is nearly flooded, and is fully supplied. So will it continue to grow? Will more conferences be added? New suppliers show up? Or has growth slowed?

    Or will it continue to grow rapidly as more and more people set up websites for the first time?
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  2. #2
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    Or will it continue to grow rapidly as more and more people set up websites for the first time?
    Of course, In my opinion anyway, More people getting on the net, more broadband thats cheaper. I would say its knowhere near its peak.
    Regards

  3. #3
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    I say it's still a long way to go yet. I know we are still growing as are many others around here.
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  4. #4
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    Originally posted by JHosts
    What needs to happen, is the cost of starting a web hosting company needs to go up. And it needs to become more regulated. The government should make it as hard to start a web hosting company, as it is to start a brick and mortar store. You don't see any little "sniper devils" running around opening up brick and mortars do you? No, only online can that be achieved.
    I cant tell you how much i agree I doubt they could stop people doing it though if they can get a domain and a paypal account thats it there away.

  5. #5
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    We're nowhere near peaked. We have several countries just now opening to the market.
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  6. #6
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    I never thought the web hosting business was very lucrative, by any means, and I still don't. Bandwith still costs money, computer hardware still costs money, and, most importantly and unfortunately, the industry has been saturated beyond belief with unbelievably low prices, god-awful support, and even worse business policies and practices. With the ability of any twelve-year-old with a parent who has a credit card to enter the hosting business fairly easily, the market is just becoming more insanely polluted with kids who just want to earn a quick buck. I may sound bitter, which would be rather uncalled for, considering my age, but I'm just stating the reality; the market just isn't conducive for entrepreneurs who are looking to start up a brand new hosting business and actually compete with some of the already established and well reputed businesses.

    Far more profitable than products are human services: design, development, consulting, etc. One can make a decent salary offering his services many times more easily than by offering hosting because services are what people want, and good ones are much harder to find.

  7. #7
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    Originally posted by SniperDevil
    I never thought the web hosting business was very lucrative, by any means, and I still don't. Bandwith still costs money, computer hardware still costs money, and, most importantly and unfortunately, the industry has been saturated beyond belief with unbelievably low prices, god-awful support, and even worse business policies and practices. With the ability of any twelve-year-old with a parent who has a credit card to enter the hosting business fairly easily, the market is just becoming more insanely polluted with kids who just want to earn a quick buck. I may sound bitter, which would be rather uncalled for, considering my age, but I'm just stating the reality; the market just isn't conducive for entrepreneurs who are looking to start up a brand new hosting business and actually compete with some of the already established and well reputed businesses.
    I don't think many people would disagree. There's a lot of people that grab high bandwidth/space reseller packages or dedicated servers, slap on Cpanel and call it a hosting business. There's money to be made and there's a lot of people saturating the market and almost everyone is overselling. My personal view, is have a real hosting company that doesn't oversell, but still has reasonable prices. I.e., no 90 gig bandwidth, 5 gig disk space plans for $5/mo.

    It's not economical and the business survives solely on the assumption that most clients will not use their allowed limits--and it's true most of the time, which is why any of these people are still alive and running a business. In my opinion, attitudes, skill sets of staff and things like the generic control panels and software that everyone uses needs to change. At this point, few to none of the web hosts are really any different from the other, other than the data center they use and the skill levels of their staff members, or the market of just trying to undersell each other with impossible limits per plan (almost like they would rather not make any money than to lose a client that wants to nickel and dime everything to literally save $1 a month).

    I figure, who wants those clients--they want cheap, not quality service, and selling in bulk and underselling everyone else, ends up making very little money for a lot of work and accounts for a lot of company's lack of money to hire skilled support and administrative staff members, where the service inevitably sucks no matter what their business strategy. So, there's always going to be those type of hosts, those type of clients and not really anything to set one host apart from the other, and this sort of reflects poorly on web hosting in general. However, people that offer the rare, truly quality service and not the cookie-cutter host, at least have the ability and potential to grow into a business that will stay around (by making a profit, that is), having quality staff and making their clients happy--provided they continue to offer good plans at a still good, reasonable price.

  8. #8
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    I never thought the web hosting business was very lucrative, by any means, and I still don't.
    If one goes for the budget hosting market I guess it's not. However, hosting is a service and that means it can actually support high markups if the right image/value is projected to the right potential customers.

    As for the hosting industry peaking, that may be somewhat true for certain countries. However, in most developing countries things are just now starting to move.

  9. #9
    Truth be told, I think the web hosting industry, and I might be considered extreme for saying so, is sort of in disarray.

    I feel a little bit disgusted whenever I see web hosts that offer 100gb of bandwidth and 10 gb of disk space for $5; it is hard to imagine how people are able to turn a profit. You figure companies spending money on dedicated servers are spending anywhere between $100-200+ per month. At those rates, you've already allotted your terabyte of bandwidth before you've even made back half of thr cost per server. Then they put in their Terms of Service that they will suspend your account if you use too many resources.

    It seems like highly unethical business practice if you ask me, and something I would correlate with outright lying. The sad part is, many people who don't know better fall for it every time. Partially joking, I don't think there are many other industries besides the web hosting industry and the cell phone industry where you always have to worry about shady characters running businesses.

    But this is capitalism and the free-market place for you. We wouldn't have this opportunity if it weren't for it. But when people try to win on quantity, you beat them out on quality instead.
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  10. #10
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    It's actually not webhosting that's risking so many shading dealings, though it's one of many, but any business online. There's no debating it. Every time you order from a company that isn't a major player, you're risking several things (CC info being logged or stolen based on how they store the information/data, if they do at all, getting the item at all, getting the right item, getting the item in the condition you were supposed to get it in, dealing with additional and unexpected charges/fees and hidden clauses, outright fraud, scams, etc.) The Internet/WWW creates such a higher amount of risk.

    Some companies are not a risk to deal with and CC companies help make fraud easier to deal with, but I have personally gotten bit when I researched a company to order a Christmas gift for my wife a couple of years ago and they were around for a long time, fairly large and didn't have a lot of complaints. They screwed around for a couple of months, saying the item wasn't in yet, and how they were waiting on the supplier. When I tried to get my order canceled (I had to go through someone else after they were taking so long), they kept saying they'd refund the money, I had to scream and yell about it and they said they'd do it for sure, then they said they forwarded it to their billing department, then they had something else, then stopped answering phone calls, faxes, emails, etc. altogether.

    A month later they had messages saying they filed for bankruptcy and all that good stuff. I had to do a chargeback at the end of it. So, sometimes it's still a risk. Some sites will not go bankrupt, but most can go under at any time. The web hosting industry has many companies that just vanish overnight and you suddenly hear all these horror stories. It really sucks. People can't always investigate the host as in-depth as they'd like, but that's the only way to really help prevent it from happening and all the overselling of impossible plans is a good indication to me that they either don't know what they are doing or have no long term plans.

    Those hosts just cater to people by making the plans as low as they can get away with and overselling every resource they have--those type of hosts have absolutely no intention of being around long term, they only want to make as much as they can, as quick as they can. Some that stay around are just lucky and as mentioned before, they have no real foundation to stay alive other than month to month and they certainly aren't making enough of a profit to hire quality staff and everyone suffers due to it.

  11. #11
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    Originally posted by aixagent
    Truth be told, I think the web hosting industry, and I might be considered extreme for saying so, is sort of in disarray.
    The same thing can be said for anything online. The web design industry was even worse a few years ago than it is today. However, as more and more people come online I think they become more discerning. I don't think there are more crooks or fly-by-nighters in hosting than there is in any other industry. It's just a fact of life that some businesses are worth dealing with and some aren't. The big difference online is that there are just so many to choose from and there are no geographical limitations (well, some, but I won't get into that right now).

    It's a shifting landscape and I think that hosting is still very far from reaching its peak. More countries are coming online and more people are coming to the Net, and a host is not limited to any geographical area. Businesses that only a few years ago could not see any advantage in having websites are now coming around.
    We have a way to go yet before hosting starts reaching a peak.

  12. #12
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    Why would it every peak? As more people browse the web, more often, on every faster broadband connections, there will always be a greater demand on the server end for more servers, in more locations, on ever faster backbone connections.
    bigwrench

  13. #13
    I never thought the web hosting business was very lucrative, by any means, and I still don't.
    The web hosting industry possesses enormous potential - even still- for new startups...

    I feel a little bit disgusted whenever I see web hosts that offer 100gb of bandwidth and 10 gb of disk space for $5; it is hard to imagine how people are able to turn a profit.
    Truth be told - most of them arent - and even the ones that are succeeding with this business model can have the customers they are attracting and can keep the associated headaches - personally, I have no intentions to market or target this market segment - and hence, am not bothered by what the companies who target this segment are doing to attract clients

    but any business online. There's no debating it. Every time you order from a company that isn't a major player, you're risking several things (CC info being logged or stolen based on how they store the information/data, if they do at all, getting the item at all, getting the right item, getting the item in the condition you were supposed to get it in, dealing with additional and unexpected charges/fees and hidden clauses, outright fraud, scams, etc.) The Internet/WWW creates such a higher amount of risk.
    This, in my opinion, is the proverbial "hitting the nail on the head" comment. The real area of growth for the hosting industry is beyound simple web site hosting (though there will always be a market for this - and for the moment, that market is still growing). The real value of the internet - and one that has yet to be fully realized or exploited - is leveraging internet technologies to directly influence a businesses bottom line. To date, only the real large players have been able to capitalize on this statement - as consumer and business confidence in overall internet security is low - and rightfully so... The hosting industry is one of the worst culprits - but, by no means is it the only one...

  14. #14
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    The way I see it, the hosting market is going to split into two sectors over time... One is the personal hosting sector for first-
    timers looking to open a simple website.. Here, hosts will primarily fight over disk space and bandwidth..

    The second sector would be a technology-oriented sector where hosts try offering the best platform and features (not space & bandwidth).. This segment would remain competitive and grow fast, but the entry barrier being a little higher would keep kiddy hosts out of the fray..
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  15. #15
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    the industry has not reached its peak or never came down, it is 50 - 50 all time

  16. #16
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    the hosting market has definately not reached its peak... there is huge growth potential in the coming years. The US hosting market is growing not rapidly but steadily at about 10 to 20% each year if I am correct.. That is good growth.. However the real rapid growth over the next 10 years will come from developing countries in Asia, eastern europe, etc.. The developed countries will however continue to form the foundation of the hosting market with steady growth...

    If you look at countries such as India, they have a huge potential market.. There are lot of potential consumers, developers and small businesses looking for an online presence.. Already I'm sure many hosting companies have seen a flood of Indian customers in the last few years, at least we have.. This trend is likely to grow quite fast

    the market may appear saturated from the point of webhosts.. It may appear to be over competitive...but the fact is that 90% of these hosts are little competition to the bigger and more innovative ones. The key in the hosting industry is being innovative with marketing, innovative with your product and ensuring you adhere to good business practises. If you can do that, the remaining 90% wouldn't bother you. i've seen such an incredible lack of ideas in the last few years that it's kind of pathetic
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  17. #17
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    Would it be at all reasonable to assume that a lot of the clients in the developing countries will not necessarily be looking for hosting in the US, especially as their own countries connections and hosting options grow along with it? I've not seen a huge influx of such clients, though I've seen a growing number over the years, I've not known of any companies in the US to ever see any significant increase, and perhaps that's because the business interests might be more localized to that region in a lot of cases (maybe not).

    As for the lack of anything new or innovative in the hosting industry, I think we can all agree there. Nothing new, everyone offering the same features, control panels (and thus, the same limitations and problems and bugs, in a lot of aspects), and basically the same cookie-cutter, generic service with the same features and nothing sets them apart a lot of the time (at least that's what I've seen over the more than a decade I've been in the web hosting industry).

  18. #18
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    Originally posted by Tim_Greer
    Would it be at all reasonable to assume that a lot of the clients in the developing countries will not necessarily be looking for hosting in the US, especially as their own countries connections and hosting options grow along with it? I've not seen a huge influx of such clients, though I've seen a growing number over the years, I've not known of any companies in the US to ever see any significant increase, and perhaps that's because the business interests might be more localized to that region in a lot of cases (maybe not).
    Traditionally, yes, consumers in developing countries would go towards hosting in their own country. But because of little competition in such countries, and high bandwidth prices.. consumers in developing countries are increasingly looking towards the international market...

    The influx is not huge, percentage wise under 5% right now... But 10 years ago it may have been under 1%... but my main point is that the # of consumers from developing countries is growing fast.. I estimate that within 10 years, you'd see the percentage rise quite rapidly..

    This is what I see as ensuring the hosting industry continues to grow strong and never be near its peak...
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  19. #19
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    I see, I'm not familiar with their costs. No doubt that IT and Internet related businesses are growing pretty quickly in developing countries. I also assume that in the next few years that unless bandwidth prices drop considerably, a lot of these bulk dedicated server plans that offer high spec systems with a terabyte or two (or more) a month for $200 are not going to be around or offer such great service (not that many of them are now, if any).

  20. #20
    Webhosting industry is travelling right now from the growth stage to it's maturity level, yet it has not reached the maturity period, it will take around another ten years for a saturation level to be reached.
    Big companies will continue to grow and small companies will be taken over by the bigger ones due to increasing competition and reducing prices.
    Only Quality Service providers will survive in long run in this industry and others will have to quit.

  21. #21
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    There is no such thing as a peak in this industry: Hosting is a service
    The same way as there will always be carpenters, there will always be webhosts.
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  22. #22
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    Originally posted by SniperDevil
    I never thought the web hosting business was very lucrative, by any means, and I still don't.

    IMO the market is very lucrative, but it's all about perceptions and attitudes. I'm a very upbeat and positive person, so for me the glass is always half full. That's my years of Tony Robbins training there.
    . . . the market just isn't conducive for entrepreneurs who are looking to start up a brand new hosting business and actually compete with some of the already established and well reputed businesses.
    I would challenge that statement.

    Hosting is a good business model. You have a product that anyone on the planet (with a PC + net access) can purchase. You can interact with them in seconds. Your product is delivered in seconds, and you can disable their service in seconds, if you have to.

    You also build your client base from month to month, so it's like climbing a set of stairs. You start out at the bottom of the stairs, and each day/week/month, you climb one step. So the clients you gain this month, you add ontop of your existing clients. This allows you to safely increase your expenditure, to keep up with the revenue.

    Sure, hosting has its downside, that's for sure, but all businesses do. There is plenty of life left in the market yet, and those who are talented enough will succeed and prosper.
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  23. #23
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    Originally posted by Tim_Greer
    . . . As for the lack of anything new or innovative in the hosting industry, I think we can all agree there. Nothing new, everyone offering the same features, control panels (and thus, the same limitations and problems and bugs, in a lot of aspects), and basically the same cookie-cutter, generic service with the same features and nothing sets them apart a lot of the time (at least that's what I've seen over the more than a decade I've been in the web hosting industry).
    Tim, maybe this is tangenting slightly but what, in your opinion, could a new hosting service do to really differenciate itself?

    This is something that I've thought long and hard about, and there's really not too far you can go, outside of what is conventionally known as hosting.
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  24. #24
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    Originally posted by Aussie Bob
    Tim, maybe this is tangenting slightly but what, in your opinion, could a new hosting service do to really differenciate itself?

    This is something that I've thought long and hard about, and there's really not too far you can go, outside of what is conventionally known as hosting.
    I agree that it may be difficult do differentiate your product offerings, specially with a limited budget, but it can be done. One way would be to concentrate on a niche. Some areas that come to mind are:
    1. Offer a technology that many don't provide because of a high upfront cost or complexity.
    2. Develop proprietary tools to manage or monitor your sites.

    A company that I admire has done just this. They specialize on a specific Windows configuration not usually found and greatly limit the number of customers per box. They also have proprietary software to ensure system stability and a custom control panel so powerful that you can track your database queries and see how they are executing.

    This obviously means that one would have to take the risk and pay a premium to acquire the technology and or develop the proprietary tools. But once the investment is made you can in turn charge a premium and enjoy the lack of true competition.

    If such specialization is not possible you can always promote the one thing others cannot have, yourself. If you are truly committed and service oriented this can be the differentiating factor. But this is harder to sell because everyone claims to provide great service.

    To get back on topic, the industry is still young and seems to be a long way from peaking.
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  25. #25
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    Originally posted by Aussie Bob
    Tim, maybe this is tangenting slightly :angel: but what, in your opinion, could a new hosting service do to really differenciate itself?

    This is something that I've thought long and hard about, and there's really not too far you can go, outside of what is conventionally known as hosting. :uhh:
    Give me a few months and I'll answer that question. I'm not at all joking or being sarcastic when I say that this is a very fair question and I don't mean to sound like I'm evading the question. However, I'm not wanting to disclose my view on what can or should be done, yet. I don't want to start any hype, but also I'm not claiming anything is ground breaking and never have been done before either. That said (being vague), I won't say anything again for probably 4 or 6 months about it. :-)

  26. #26
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    Originally posted by Aussie Bob
    Tim, maybe this is tangenting slightly but what, in your opinion, could a new hosting service do to really differenciate itself?

    This is something that I've thought long and hard about, and there's really not too far you can go, outside of what is conventionally known as hosting.
    There are such things, Rob...If I hadn't been screwing around with my far too eventful personal life these last three months, you'd already have smacked yourself on the head and gone after competing with me!

    <edit> And I'll add that if Tim is thinking of new and innovative things, it's likely that he'll come across our idea, so it's good to know that we've got a few more months to actually bring it to the public. </edit>
    Last edited by Andrew; 06-28-2005 at 09:11 PM.

  27. #27
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    I think the hosting market will "mature" leaving plenty of room. Internet & web site use will continue to grow, be it business where people have almost figured out a site is necessary to personal or new ideas from people trying to generate "e-revenue" from new concepts for sites.
    I also agree totally with the previous about niches, and building a step at a time.

    What I feel will be the "maturity factor" is that sooner or later the "average" customer will start to understand overselling & why that $2 for 20 GB deal just won't work. They will also come to understand about resellers & little VPS outfits (nothing against them if used for suitable purposes) that are really somebody jumping in "cheap" throwing up a fancy web site, promising the world for $25 per year in advance, making a quick $1,250 before the bottom falls out of their set up, buying that new HDTV or whatever they have been wanting, then opening shop again with a different name & repeating the process.

    Maybe then we will stop seeing so many "this host stinks" and "this host ripped me off" posts here everyday.

    Also I personally think as the market matures there will be an increased demand for more personalized service. I think we are all already well burned out on calling the local pharmacy chain and having to select from a dozen menu options just to order a refill or calling some company, doing the dozen menu entries, only to get a message to leave a message "all agents are busy helping other customers" (and no matter when you call you always get that message).
    I also know I wish I could get some service providers to let me tell them what I need from that service, not be stuck with choosing between less than I want or more than I need.

    Just my 2 cents, for my sake I hope I'm close to right. If it's all over as it is now there is no hope for anybody with less than 100,000 accounts or several hundred servers...
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  28. #28
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    Originally posted by Andrew
    There are such things, Rob...If I hadn't been screwing around with my far too eventful personal life these last three months, you'd already have smacked yourself on the head and gone after competing with me!

    Well you better get cracking.

    Hosting is a pretty basic product though, although with complex undertones. I really tried to differenciate HTTPme, with the .COMmunity platform etc, but was innovation in the communications/support/customer interaction side, whereas the hosting product was basically the same (whm/cpanel) as everyone else in that niche.

    Don't get me wrong, HTTPme stood out and got a lot of folk's attention, and is a great brand, but I also think some folks missed the ideology/concept behind it, and couldn't understand it, hence we lost them as potential clients. So there is a warning for those who want to push the envelope, as not to color too far outside of the lines.

    I for one am done with envelope pushing. I'm coloring between the lines, playing it safe, keeping everything as simple and perfectly functional as possible. But maybe that's more an indication of me, in this cruising phase of my life, be that business or personal.

    I await with much interest what you chaps have cooking. Let's hope it makes for some lively discussion.
    Last edited by Aussie Bob; 06-29-2005 at 12:05 AM.
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  29. #29
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    Originally posted by DDT
    Maybe then we will stop seeing so many "this host stinks" and "this host ripped me off" posts here everyday.
    They are much fewer and farther between these days, which is good. What's more IMO, is that the complaints we see nowadays are more often about an established provider, and it turns out to be a mistake/oversight that gets cleared up (on here, or in private where it should be done).

    I'd say the industry paints itself a much nicer picture these days. Less people bother to try, and fewer get away with, the nasty tricks they could pull off 2 - 3 years ago.

    Gary

  30. #30
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    You've all said that it's too easy to get going, and too easy to get out.

    If people started holding their 'dead' hosts responsible, then maybe it would be less attractive.
    If a host goes bust, then they a liable for their debts (unless they are limited company), and if people followed them up, maybe it would work.

    But then again it's very expensive too sue someone over $5.
    Andrew Thomas

  31. #31
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    Originally posted by SniperDevil
    I never thought the web hosting business was very lucrative, by any means, and I still don't. Bandwith still costs money, computer hardware still costs money, and, most importantly and unfortunately, the industry has been saturated beyond belief with unbelievably low prices, god-awful support, and even worse business policies and practices. With the ability of any twelve-year-old with a parent who has a credit card to enter the hosting business fairly easily, the market is just becoming more insanely polluted with kids who just want to earn a quick buck. I may sound bitter, which would be rather uncalled for, considering my age, but I'm just stating the reality; the market just isn't conducive for entrepreneurs who are looking to start up a brand new hosting business and actually compete with some of the already established and well reputed businesses.

    Far more profitable than products are human services: design, development, consulting, etc. One can make a decent salary offering his services many times more easily than by offering hosting because services are what people want, and good ones are much harder to find.
    I disagree. I started out in the design biz and, after about a year, realized that I was making the same amount of money for 1 hour working hard on a design that I could make with a few mouse clicks (setting up a new hosting account) in the hosting biz. Granted, you have expenses with hosting...but if you have a solid business plan and make allowances for those expenses, you should come out quite a bit ahead.

    Hosting, if done correctly, can be very lucrative.

    --Tina
    ||| 99.999% Uptime SLA!!!
    Plenty of space and bandwidth to fit your needs!
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  32. #32
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    Originally posted by AH-Tina
    I disagree. I started out in the design biz and, after about a year, realized that I was making the same amount of money for 1 hour working hard on a design that I could make with a few mouse clicks (setting up a new hosting account) in the hosting biz. Granted, you have expenses with hosting...but if you have a solid business plan and make allowances for those expenses, you should come out quite a bit ahead.

    Hosting, if done correctly, can be very lucrative.

    --Tina
    I agree- designing is an absolute pain in the ***.

    Hosting is a lot more profitable if you can fill your time.
    The amount you get paid in hosting is a lot higher per hour than for design work- IF you can get enough work in hosting to work for a full hour.
    You can make $1000/month with only 100 customers- and most of them will only contact you once a month or so. But of course, you've got to get 100 customers- easier said than done.

    Hosting is a recurring product- people come back every month (normally), whereas with design, you need fresh customers every month.
    Andrew Thomas

  33. #33
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    Originally posted by AH-Tina
    I disagree . . . . Granted, you have expenses with hosting...but if you have a solid business plan and make allowances for those expenses, you should come out quite a bit ahead.

    Hosting, if done correctly, can be very lucrative.
    I agree 100%. Hosting is a great business model, but only works great when done correctly, or as correctly as you can get it.
    AussieHost.com Aussie Bob, host since 2001
    Host Multiple Domains on Fast Australian Servers!!

  34. #34
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    Jan 2004
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    The hosting business is growing every day. Reason is there are people all over the world coming to the internet for the first time ever. These people I like to call "new fish" in which guessing that a good certain amount of thoughs people will be needing a website at that point or in the future.

    As well I do not see to many downsides of this business compared to other businesses. Though with this business that many do not factor in is it takes time as well money to build it up. As well there are times when you need to stay up for 18+ hours at a time fixing a problem. Or a server goes down and the back up is not working right.... Or you get a major Ddos attack on your server.

    Or do not forget the customer that will say they will "sue" you . Besides that it is great fun though some people call me crazy....

    Oh and do not forget your personal life tends to go down hill for a while .

    Originally posted by Aussie Bob

    Hosting is a good business model. You have a product that anyone on the planet (with a PC + net access) can purchase. You can interact with them in seconds. Your product is delivered in seconds, and you can disable their service in seconds, if you have to.

    You also build your client base from month to month, so it's like climbing a set of stairs. You start out at the bottom of the stairs, and each day/week/month, you climb one step. So the clients you gain this month, you add ontop of your existing clients. This allows you to safely increase your expenditure, to keep up with the revenue.

    Sure, hosting has its downside, that's for sure, but all businesses do. There is plenty of life left in the market yet, and those who are talented enough will succeed and prosper. [/B]
    Last edited by Torith; 06-29-2005 at 07:21 PM.

  35. #35
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    Originally posted by Torith
    . . . Oh and do not forget your personal life tends to go down hill for a while .
    Mine didn't. Things stayed pretty even throughout.
    AussieHost.com Aussie Bob, host since 2001
    Host Multiple Domains on Fast Australian Servers!!

  36. #36
    Many of the european countries havent even heard of web hosting or how it works ;-) so web hosting and this industry has a looong way to go ;-)

  37. #37
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Atlanta Ga
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    No Way

    No way has it peaked.

    Think about it. How long will it be before users store there files in a database instead of the filesystem.

    I think the hosting industry is on the verge of an explosion, rather than peaking.

    Just my 2 cents.

    Richard M.

  38. #38
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
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    Originally posted by Aussie Bob
    Mine didn't. Things stayed pretty even throughout.
    Well you are the master of web hosting. You use to own HTTPme which is a great company and of a nice size. Now you have a new one. So you got the ins and outs of the business already. Or you are just plain out lucky... .

  39. #39
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    Maybe Bob had the right price point to ensure that funds were available and help could be hired when needed... I suppose that staying out of the "kiddie hosts" market also helped. It's no news that kids tend to whine a lot, with or without enough reason.

  40. #40
    Join Date
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    I was talking about Aussie Bob's previous business, HTTPme, Bob being a contraction of his name, Robert. I tried to address him with "Robert" before, but he didn't like it much. As such, I refer to him as simply Bob.

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