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Thread: Bring back DDT

  1. #1

    Bring back DDT

    The myth of DDT versus the reality of malaria in Africa

    "Malaria has killed more people, especially children, than any other infectious disease in history. Annual deaths from malaria, mostly in Africa, Asia and Central America, have long been estimated at between 1 million and 2.7 million."

    "British scientists at Oxford University recently reported that in 2002 there were 515 million people infected with the most dangerous strain of malaria. Malaria deaths could easily exceed the 3 million people killed annually by AIDS."

    "Since 1972 more than 50 million people have died from malaria."



    DDT can save millions of lives every year!

  2. #2
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    DDT can also kill millions of animals each year!
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  3. #3
    Originally posted by elix
    DDT can also kill millions of animals each year!
    You didn't read the article.

  4. #4
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    Very interesting article, makes you think.

    But I'd like to see some other sources of scientific research regarding DDT.

  5. #5
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    Another mosquito-borne disease, West Nile virus, which was unheard of in the United States prior to 1998, has come to our country from Africa. It now infects tens of thousands of people in 21 states, and many have died.
    Well the article is totally **** since this part of it is a lie.
    West Nile Virus has only infected maybe a dozen people and very few have died from it.
    Kerry Jones

  6. #6
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    Originally posted by Kerry Jones
    Well the article is totally **** since this part of it is a lie.
    West Nile Virus has only infected maybe a dozen people and very few have died from it.
    What makes you say that, Kerry?
    According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), over 15,000 people in the U.S. have tested positive for WNV infection since 1999, including over 500 deaths. Many more people have likely been infected with WNV, but have experienced mild or no symptoms
    Source: http://westnilevirus.nbii.gov

    Interesting read, tekky60
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  7. #7
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    WNV infection since 1999,
    Kerry Jones

  8. #8
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    No study has been able to link the use of DDT with any negative human health impact, even though sprayers have worked with the chemical many hours a day.
    --

  9. #9
    Originally posted by Kerry Jones
    Well the article is totally **** since this part of it is a lie.
    West Nile Virus has only infected maybe a dozen people and very few have died from it.
    Take a look:

    2004 West Nile Virus Activity in the United States (Center for Disease Control)


    In 2003, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported more than 9,800 human infections in the United States and more than 250 human deaths

  10. #10
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    I watched a BBC documentary about Malaria a few weeks ago and it said they had found a cure, that was based on a Chinese herbal anti-malarial recipe from 2000 years ago.

    The only problem was, it relied on a plant and they could not grow enough of the plant to supply the high demand. So they are supposed to have designed a man-made version of the drug, which has the same properties and effectiveness, but that they can make in huge quantities. The success rate is 100% at the moment, but there have been a lot of other drugs which have had similar success, but the infection has learnt to fight it. The only hope is, is that this drug is natural and not man-made.

    Also, they are supposed to be getting closer to an anti-malarial immunisation, which is based on the fact that when the malaria infection flows around the blood, the reason our bodies immune system can not detect it is because is camoflauges itself to same as the blood. So this immunisation works in that it changes the properties of the infection so it makes them detectable by our immune system. I think the success rate of it was between 30 and 60%.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/sn/tvradio/prog..._summary.shtml
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  11. #11
    Originally posted by UK PC Net Matty
    I watched a BBC documentary about Malaria a few weeks ago and it said they had found a cure, that was based on a Chinese herbal anti-malarial recipe from 2000 years ago.

    The only problem was, it relied on a plant and they could not grow enough of the plant to supply the high demand. So they are supposed to have designed a man-made version of the drug, which has the same properties and effectiveness, but that they can make in huge quantities. The success rate is 100% at the moment, but there have been a lot of other drugs which have had similar success, but the infection has learnt to fight it. The only hope is, is that this drug is natural and not man-made.

    Also, they are supposed to be getting closer to an anti-malarial immunisation, which is based on the fact that when the malaria infection flows around the blood, the reason our bodies immune system can not detect it is because is camoflauges itself to same as the blood. So this immunisation works in that it changes the properties of the infection so it makes them detectable by our immune system. I think the success rate of it was between 30 and 60%.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/sn/tvradio/prog..._summary.shtml
    Sounds good, but a drug would be way more expensive than a currently wel-known and very effective solution: DDT.

    If the government or drug companies have to invest in research, then chances are that it would take a long time to bring it to market. And, once the drug comes to market, too many health agencies and doctors and governments and drug companies would become involved to the point where the drug becomes very expensive and vey difficult to manage and dispense.

    A well-known and effective and comparatively inexpensive solution already exists: DDT. There is no real reason to keep it from being used again to combat malaria and save millions of lives every year..

  12. #12
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    If the government or drug companies have to invest in research, then chances are that it would take a long time to bring it to market. And, once the drug comes to market, too many health agencies and doctors and governments and drug companies would become involved to the point where the drug becomes very expensive and vey difficult to manage and dispense.
    The drug is already in usage and is currently the only drug that can fight and defeat malaria (all the past drugs are now obsolete and useless against it).

    I am pretty sure that usage of DDT was stopped because the mosquito, which carrys the malaria infection, adapted and became immune to it.

    There were hopes in the 50's that by the 90's, Malaria would be wiped out by DDT, but because it became ineffective in the 60's, the WHO gave up on this idea and target.
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  13. #13
    Originally posted by UK PC Net Matty
    The drug is already in usage and is currently the only drug that can fight and defeat malaria (all the past drugs are now obsolete and useless against it).
    The anti-malaria drug may already be available but everything else about it applies: government involvement, drug companies, doctors, health organizations and costs.


    I am pretty sure that usage of DDT was stopped because the mosquito, which carrys the malaria infection, adapted and became immune to it.
    That is absolutely not true.

    You didn't read the article carefully.


    There were hopes in the 50's that by the 90's, Malaria would be wiped out by DDT, but because it became ineffective in the 60's, the WHO gave up on this idea and target.
    That's another lie about DDT.

    DDT was quite effective and had virtually wiped out malaria in many parts of the world. The reason that DDT use was stopped is explained in the article.

    Re-read the article carefully.

  14. #14
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    In the 1950s and 60s scientists attempted to wipe out malaria by using DDT to kill the mosquito that transmitted it. But the mosquito fought back, by evolving resistance to DDT. Scientists also developed drugs to attack the parasite that causes the disease, but these too lost their effectiveness when the parasite evolved resistance to them. By the 1980s the battle against malaria seemed to have been lost.
    That was taken from the BBC. All I know is what I have read and watched so I am not an expect or in a position to confirm anything, but the BBC are usually right about things, especially about things such as this.

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  15. #15
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    This argument has been used for years in the case of Malaria in third-world countries. The use of DDT in high risk areas should have continued - The human death toll from the banning of DDT has been way too high. Frankly, DDT is the cheapest, and easiest way to control the mosquito and malaria problem in high risk areas. There was a very good commentary on this issue in the New York Times a few months back, but I cannot find it online. Another good article on ths topic can be found at http://www.spiked-online.com/Printable/0000000CABF5.htm .

  16. #16
    Originally posted by Joshua
    This argument has been used for years in the case of Malaria in third-world countries. The use of DDT in high risk areas should have continued - The human death toll from the banning of DDT has been way too high. Frankly, DDT is the cheapest, and easiest way to control the mosquito and malaria problem in high risk areas. There was a very good commentary on this issue in the New York Times a few months back, but I cannot find it online. Another good article on ths topic can be found at http://www.spiked-online.com/Printable/0000000CABF5.htm .
    Great post, and great link.

    Thanks.

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