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Thread: SSL Certificate

  1. #1

    Question SSL Certificate

    Anyone knows where I can get a SSL certificate for a maximum of 20$ / year.
    Oh, and must be able for someone at from portugal to buy it.
    I understand that some locations are unable to buy certain certificates.

    Thank you,
    Johnny

  2. #2

  3. #3
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  4. #4
    Join Date
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    I know where you can Get FREE Platinum SSL Certificates value of $399

  5. #5
    Join Date
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    How about posting the link to the free Platinum SSL
    Synergy Blue LLC
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  6. #6
    Yes, Please post the link to the Free Premium SSL.

  7. #7
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    can anyone explain me what is an SSL certificate and what does it do.

  8. #8
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    Originally posted by spechackers
    can anyone explain me what is an SSL certificate and what does it do.
    I dont mean to sound harsh or anything here, but i do find it quite amusing that you asked that and run a web-developers forum...

    Anyway, a SSL (or Secure Socket Layer) certificate provides a secure connection between the server and the computer... designed for safe transfer of things like personal information and credit card details.
    Rob G.
    ShopManager - Sales & Repair Business Management Software

  9. #9
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    Originally posted by LSChosting
    I dont mean to sound harsh or anything here, but i do find it quite amusing that you asked that and run a web-developers forum...

    Anyway, a SSL (or Secure Socket Layer) certificate provides a secure connection between the server and the computer... designed for safe transfer of things like personal information and credit card details.

    My signature though indicates a webdev forum, i am an member of SpecHackers Team! which runs the forum.

    i am not the owner, but an member of that particular group.

  10. #10
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    Originally posted by LSChosting
    I dont mean to sound harsh or anything here, but i do find it quite amusing that you asked that and run a web-developers forum...

    Anyway, a SSL (or Secure Socket Layer) certificate provides a secure connection between the server and the computer... designed for safe transfer of things like personal information and credit card details.
    Ouch! how wrong that statement is - biggest load of FUD I have heard for a long time.

    SSL is the protocol that secures the connection between a web browser and web server. -goolge-> http://tiniuri.com/f/Ti for full explanation.

    The SSL Certificate is basically the key that is used to decode the encrypted stream.

    Now, a Signed Certificate is simply an indication that the organisation who runs the server (owner of the domain name) is who they say they are - and it has been verified by the Organisation who signs the certificate.

    I can go out and create a self-signed certificate and it offers exactly the same Server-Browser protection as does a 3rd Party Signed certificate. the difference with a signed certificate is that the certificate signer guarantees you are who you say you are, and when I self-sign a certificate, you have to trust that I am who I say I am. The signing of a certificate has nothing at all to do with the encryption of the data stream.
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  11. #11
    Is there any reason why you should not use OpenSSL for security certificates? Doesn't it work the same?

  12. #12
    Originally posted by AwoL
    Is there any reason why you should not use OpenSSL for security certificates? Doesn't it work the same?
    It's perfectly ok to generate your own certificates using OpenSSL. In fact, you should generate your own certificates to keep your private keys secret. The role of the certificate authorities is to guarantee that the information contained in the certificate (company name, for instance) is legitimate.

    Web browsers have a default set of certificate authorities which they trust, meaning that when the browser encounter a certificate "issued" by them, it trust that the certificate is legitimate. Otherwise, it will prompt the user to examine the certificate and manually accept or deny it.

  13. #13
    Originally posted by thestreet
    It's perfectly ok to generate your own certificates using OpenSSL. In fact, you should generate your own certificates to keep your private keys secret. The role of the certificate authorities is to guarantee that the information contained in the certificate (company name, for instance) is legitimate.

    Web browsers have a default set of certificate authorities which they trust, meaning that when the browser encounter a certificate "issued" by them, it trust that the certificate is legitimate. Otherwise, it will prompt the user to examine the certificate and manually accept or deny it.
    Agreed. Remember, though, your users will still receive that message. It's annoying, but it is free.

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