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Thread: Backup server

  1. #1

    Backup server

    Hi there. We've been approached by someone wanting to do some remote backups. I'm presuming if we set up a server with rsync and set their client up with the same this would be a good way to do it. They're looking for about 90Gb of space, so wondering what kind of server we would need to do that - it would purely be used for backups - not web hosting. Would it be OK to go for a low-end server, but put some large disks into it? If so, any providers recommended?

    Thanks

    mark

  2. #2
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    buy a reseller space from bqbackup.com and save some hassle
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  3. #3
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    How frequently are they planning to do backups and are you looking to only keep a most recent copy or are you also planning to archive? If you're planning to archive, how many copies are you planning on keeping, etc.?
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  4. #4
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    If you're just looking to do simple backups with Rsync, just about any low-end server with the appropriate size hard drive should work fine. The processor speed isn't very important, but I would shoot for 512MB of RAM, since Rsync can be somewhat of a memory hog on data sets of that size.

    In the early days of BQ Backup, we used standard dedicated servers quite successfully, with processing resources to spare. If you just need somewhere to store a copy of your data, it's a viable solution.
    Scott Burns, President
    BQ Internet Corporation
    Remote Rsync and FTP backup solutions
    *** http://www.bqbackup.com/ ***

  5. #5
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    Yeah, only things you MIGHT need to worry about are bandwidth and disk space..
    Karl Zimmerman - Steadfast: Managed Dedicated Servers and Premium Colocation
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  6. #6
    Thanks guys. Bqinternet, so what do you do now if you don't use standard dedicated servers? I've just spoken with my client and they might want to have multiple archives - is it possible to get hard drives larger than 200-250Gb ? Most hosts that I look at don't seem to offer anything larger

  7. #7
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    You can get drives up to 500 GB each. Economically, 200 GB SATA drives are rather cheap these days.

    You may want a solution for example,

    Celeron CPU, 512 MB RAM.
    2x 250 GB Raid 1

    2x 250 GB Raid 0 = 500 GB total (you lose the ability to mirror)

    Most standard boards have 2 sata on board connectors for low end servers.
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  8. #8
    That sounds great. I thihnk I'll try that out

    Thanks for the help everyone

  9. #9
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    Originally posted by mwright
    Thanks guys. Bqinternet, so what do you do now if you don't use standard dedicated servers? I've just spoken with my client and they might want to have multiple archives - is it possible to get hard drives larger than 200-250Gb ? Most hosts that I look at don't seem to offer anything larger
    While dedicated servers come with standard sizes such as 120GB or 250GB, this is due to the price/GB for mid-size drives. You can get single drives up to 400GB (and soon, 500GB), but they're not as cost effective. This is the reason why you don't see dedicated server providers offering them as a standard feature, but most should be able to install such a larger drive on request.

    Once you get beyond the capacity of a single hard drive, you'll want to start using RAID5 to take advantage of multiple drives. We have 1U servers with as much as 1.2TB of storage. Using 3U servers, we're able to achieve up to 5TB per server.
    Scott Burns, President
    BQ Internet Corporation
    Remote Rsync and FTP backup solutions
    *** http://www.bqbackup.com/ ***

  10. #10
    thanks again. BQinternet - recommended you to a client in the UK

    Ade

  11. #11
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    fwiw, sprintserve has an 800 gig server offered in the ded/colo section .

  12. #12
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    bqinternet has great service at very affordable prices! I would recommend them. You guys should add more than 100GB backup plans.

  13. #13
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    Just as a note, backing up onto a disk in the same server as the other disk with your data on is NOT a good idea.

    I've seen too many PSU blowouts, fried motherboards, etc etc that have taken out both disks, and left people without data. You need to back up to REMOTE location, where nothing else can affect your backups.

    If you're the one actually doing the remote backups then that's fine

  14. #14
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    Originally posted by RazorBlue - Dan
    Just as a note, backing up onto a disk in the same server as the other disk with your data on is NOT a good idea.

    I've seen too many PSU blowouts, fried motherboards, etc etc that have taken out both disks, and left people without data. You need to back up to REMOTE location, where nothing else can affect your backups.

    If you're the one actually doing the remote backups then that's fine
    Dan is absolutely correct. Any number of things can cause BOTH hard drives in a server to fail (or even a mirrored RAID array).

    If you're really serious about backup, you should always have more than one backup... a local copy on the server, and a remote copy in another data center. If you want to take it a step further, you might want to keep an additional read-only backup (on tape, DVDs, or similar media) in that event that someone gains access to your server and deletes both your current copy and your remote backups.
    Scott Burns, President
    BQ Internet Corporation
    Remote Rsync and FTP backup solutions
    *** http://www.bqbackup.com/ ***

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