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  1. #1

    some CPU questions

    Hi

    Thanks to the kind souls here.

    I am reading some articles about HT, and they mentioned about clock cycles. Is there a specific period of time to define clock cycles? e.g. 1 clock = 5 seconds. Or clock cycles is the amount of time taken by each task?

    The next thing is, i see P4 2.8A, C, E. I understand that the alphabets represent their "functions".
    1. Is there a more technical term to call the alphabets?
    2. Also, is there a list of all the alphabets vs their functions?
    3. How have of such "alphabets" are there?
    4. Are they all the same for all the CPU(perhaps provided that CPU supports that, i mean is it going to be the same, if there is).


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    772
    hi,

    *The number of clock cycles per instruction is the same as the number of machine cycles for a clocked implementation.
    *P4 2.8A, C, E same for all cpu's.
    Bright Info Solutions

  3. #3
    Hi

    Can you point the exact page that contains the definition of the A,C,E etc for the CPUs? I've browsed through intel.com but can't seem to find anything specific.

  4. #4
    Hopefully this post can draw some more attention to this. Intel website is simply too broad for me to search for anything specific.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Bohemia, NY
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    61
    Originally posted by Uncle Mad
    Hopefully this post can draw some more attention to this. Intel website is simply too broad for me to search for anything specific.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pentium...cal_highlights

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    1,715
    As JeffG's link indicates, the technical term for the lettering is 'revisions.' All chips of the same revision have the same feature set. A revision may have multiple subversions ('stepping'). People building multi-CPU systems need to make sure all CPUs have the same speed, revision, and stepping.

    Clock cycles are measured in GHz (billions of cycles per second). No instruction may take less than one clock cycle, but processors can and do run more than one instruction at once, and some instructions can take multiple cycles. In other words, frequency (cycles per second) helps you compare CPUs within a revision, but won't help comparison between revisions, families, or brands.
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  7. #7
    You're great!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Southern CA
    Posts
    170
    C = 800Mhz fsb, HT, northwood core, runs relatively cool
    A = 533Mhz fsb, prescott core, runs hot, slow fsb, not recommended
    E = 800Mhz fsb, HT, prescott core, runs hot, about same performance as C chip, but possibly cheaper.

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