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  1. #1

    bandwidth question

    I am looking at two colocation facilities. And I am confused at the bandwidth overage charging method. Could someone equate these two quotes for me?

    Company 1

    Price - $99.95 per month
    Tranfer - One Megabit (1,024 kilobits) per second in bandwidth
    (Each additional 128 kbps is $20.00/per 128 kbps/month.)
    method - 95th %


    Company 2

    Price - $109/month
    Tranfer - 1 Mbps
    bandwidth overages $.50/GB
    method - 95th %


    I don't follow how to equate 128 kbps/month @ $20 vs the $.50/GB.


    Thanks for the help.

  2. #2
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    Company 2 seems to be using two billing methods, which is somewhat confusing. I'd ask them as to how they calcluate per GB usage on 95%....
    Karl Zimmerman - Steadfast: Managed Dedicated Servers and Premium Colocation
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  3. #3
    Thanks for the quick response. I will do that.

  4. #4
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    Generally that means because 1mbps of 95th (if used 100% 24x7, uni-directionally) can produce 328gb/mo of bandwidth, their price per mbps is relative to that figure.

    If that assumption is correct, it would indicate that they bill overages at $164/mbps, in 1/328mbps increments (aka very small increments).

  5. #5
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    Originally posted by porcupine
    Generally that means because 1mbps of 95th (if used 100% 24x7, uni-directionally) can produce 328gb/mo of bandwidth, their price per mbps is relative to that figure.

    If that assumption is correct, it would indicate that they bill overages at $164/mbps, in 1/328mbps increments (aka very small increments).
    If that were the case it may make sense, but by saying it is 95th that definiely isn't the case, as in 95th you can never say that 1 Mbit/sec will equal a certain number of GB. If they are saying that 1 mbit/sec equal 324GB or whatnot, then they are not doing 95th percentile, although that is what was stated.
    Karl Zimmerman - Steadfast: Managed Dedicated Servers and Premium Colocation
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  6. #6
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    Originally posted by KarlZimmer
    If that were the case it may make sense, but by saying it is 95th that definiely isn't the case, as in 95th you can never say that 1 Mbit/sec will equal a certain number of GB. If they are saying that 1 mbit/sec equal 324GB or whatnot, then they are not doing 95th percentile, although that is what was stated.
    Yeah, I'd agree (in theory its predictable granted based on utilization statistics, but then so is the chaos theory, thats why theories, are well.. theories). A lot of providers recently have switched however to metering by the GB method, or expressing numbers in that manner (ourselves included), due to general market ignorance on the customer side.

  7. #7
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    Originally posted by porcupine
    Yeah, I'd agree (in theory its predictable granted based on utilization statistics, but then so is the chaos theory, thats why theories, are well.. theories). A lot of providers recently have switched however to metering by the GB method, or expressing numbers in that manner (ourselves included), due to general market ignorance on the customer side.
    But these are the types of things that make it even more confusing... When people start saying they bill 95th, but don't actually follow 95th percentile billing it just creates added confusion. if you are billing per GB then say you're billing per GB and if you're billing on 95th say you're billing on 95th.
    Karl Zimmerman - Steadfast: Managed Dedicated Servers and Premium Colocation
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  8. #8
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    Argee with Karl here, it's just plain silly to do what they are doing. I'd definately avoid the 2nd quote, as they're obviously either:

    a) Not understanding 95th percentile themselves

    or

    b) Hoping customers won't, so they can potentially charge more money.

    The first one isn't technically correct either, as it is 1000Kbit/s per Mbit/s.
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  9. #9
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    I think what they're doing is you get 1mbps to use as you will with the server. After 1mbit, every GB will be billed at 0.50

    This is sorta not confusing because after you get your MRTG graphs, take your 1mbps (324 gb theoretically) and shave it off.
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  10. #10
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    The point is, how are they converting from 95th percentile to GB? If they measure both 95th percentile and actual usage (As we do), are they going to say, right, you've gone over your 1Mbit/s on 95th, so we'll subtract 324 (Which is wrong anyway) from your actual usage and bill you at $0.50 per GB over that? If so, then that is just plain wrong and actually fraudulant - A customer could quite easily do 400GB on 1Mbit/s 95th percentile - In which case they'd get billed for an additional 76GB which they shouldn't be getting billed for.
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  11. #11
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    Originally posted by The Broadband Man
    I think what they're doing is you get 1mbps to use as you will with the server. After 1mbit, every GB will be billed at 0.50

    This is sorta not confusing because after you get your MRTG graphs, take your 1mbps (324 gb theoretically) and shave it off.
    But that doesn't make any sense. You would have to do some rediculous calculations (making use of calculus) to do anything with that.

    I would avoid the second company. If they somehow do know what they're doing, they should explain their new method of billing.
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  12. #12
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    i don't know about calculus ... more like algebra 2 but yeah its kinda silly
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  13. #13
    Wow, I would stay away from #2 as well....

    Also number #1 ends up costing about $160/Mbps on burst...that's pretty high, I would not go that way unless you know your going to use 1 Mbps or less.

    The billing some of these shops offer is getting out of control...

    Long live 95/5%!

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