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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
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    does 10 or 100mb port matter in website hosting?

    if you get 1000gb of bw with your dedicated server, does it matter if your server port is 10 or 100?

    does 100mb port make much of difference?

  2. #2
    If you basically do quite a lot of file transfers between servers especially within the same datacenter or datacentere-hosted backup storage systems, you definitely benefit from the faster port.

    If your external traffic is heavy and if you basically peak close to 10mbps now then you might benefit from the 100mbps port. If it is always way beyond that then there is no benefits.

    Generally speaking if your server is doing a lot of file transfers or streaming media, the bigger port would be able to accommodate the higher traffic level as and when it is needed and provided your server resources can handle the increased activities.

    Most of the time, the 10mbs port is plenty.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
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    It shouldn't matter for most web hosting purposes, but I run daily in-datacenter backups to another server, and the 100 mbit really cuts down the time this takes.

    If you don't need super fast backup times, and you don't need the burstability, 10 mbit is just fine.
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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
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    Rochester, NY
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    I strongly disagree. If you have 10 customers downloading and uploading large files it takes up most of the bandwidth, needing the 100mbps port.

  5. #5
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    Jun 2003
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    I strongly disagree. If you have 10 customers downloading and uploading large files it takes up most of the bandwidth, needing the 100mbps port.
    Most residential DSL are 1.5mbps downlink, less than 100kbps uplink. 10 customers downloading at the same time would use 15mbps. A 10mbps will reduce the speed by 1/3.

    And if your average bandwidth usage is 2 - 3 mbps, it would be extremely rare that you have 10 broadband customers downloading large files at the same time.

    However, if your average bandwidth is over 5bmps, then there will be times you need more than 10mbps.

  6. #6

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
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    United Kingdom
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    jt2377,

    as others have mentioned if you have 15-20 users downloading/uploading at the same time you are quite likely to cap your 10mb port for that amount of time, taking into consideration that dsl/cable is now easily available upto 2-4mb.

    If you expect alot of usage on your server then a 100mb is definately a more viable option.
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  8. #8
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    Mar 2005
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    You could debate this all day long. Best solution is to look at your current bandwidth load. If it's high get the 100mbps because you are obviously needing to push a lot of information. If not, get the 10mbps port.

    If you are just starting out you can get a 10mbps port and upgrade if needed.

    Note: Just because people have 1.5mbps-5mbps lines, does not mean then need to pull that exact speed from your site at all time. I personally think that anything over 40-50k transfer speeds from a basic site is pretty damn good. However, if you are running a site like download.com i'd expect more.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
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    according to theplanet rought bw...my usage is around 29gb...so around 30gb per month for now.

    is that high? i don't think it's high.

    around 37.7gbs to be exact...

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
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    United States
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    10mbps port would be fine for site like that.

  11. #11
    Because of the need to deal with spikes and heavy load, I won't even consider 10Mbps anymore. Its just too slow if you keep getting hits from high-end cable/DSL or university connections.

    Then again, most of my sites are media-heavy. I agree with what was posted above that anyone who routinely sustains more than 5Mbps for appreciable amounts of time go to the 100Mbps to avoid bottlenecks.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
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    North Yorkshire, UK
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    Don't forget if you do remote backup, your connection may well be hammered for a good few hours at 10mbit, and that *will* cause mass packet loss. Trust me I've been there ...

  13. #13
    Good info. So i'm interested in a server from servermatrix (unmetered) and it doesnt mention the what speed port it is, whys that?

  14. #14
    Originally posted by smoove.
    Good info. So i'm interested in a server from servermatrix (unmetered) and it doesnt mention the what speed port it is, whys that?
    The port speed is equal to your bandwidth - thats why they call it "unmetered" - they don't measure how much bandwidth you use, since you're free to use as much of the 20, 50, or 100Mbit line that you've purcahsed as you please.

    Imagine a 20, 50, or 100Mbit line that you can max out 24/7 - thats what unmetered is - the line is all yours.

  15. #15
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    Remote Desktop uses little bandwidth, unless you are running a video playback on your server.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
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    Originally posted by RazorBlue - Dan
    Don't forget if you do remote backup, your connection may well be hammered for a good few hours at 10mbit, and that *will* cause mass packet loss. Trust me I've been there ...
    Backing up is kinda a GREAT subject. For fun, let's say you have 100 GB of data you wish to remotely back up. Just how many times do you want to do this per month on your 1000GB quota anyway?

    10 is a nice round number.

    Or for you math scholars, what would Dan's backup be for "serveral" hours over a 10 mpbs connection?

    I'm not sure, but I will wouldn't want to receive the bill at the end of the month.
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  17. #17
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    We run at about 120gb/day per box onto a NAS inside our own network so that doesn't cost anything. We then run weekly offsite backups, which doesn't amount to too much really cost wise, probably around 500gb/mo ish.

    Dan

  18. #18
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    Jun 2003
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    San Francisco
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    oh, i misread "remote backup" to "remote desktop".

    Yes, remote backup will use some bandwidth, especially if you are hosting video files. However, assuming the server is for one site only, I see little need to backup anything other than the mysql database. I am sure the site owner has a copy of all the pages and video files.

    If it is a hosting machine, you should go with 100mbps anyway because you never know if/when one of your customers would need to push the bandwidth to 100mbps.

  19. #19
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    Feb 2004
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    I don't think most web hosting servers really need a 100mbit/sec port.. most can easily work with 10mbit/sec.
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