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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    44

    fedora eating memory !!

    i tried redhat 9 it consume about 80 MB of the ram leaving space "for breathing"

    i installed fedora core 1 ... wooow see :

    [[email protected] root]# free
    total used free shared buffers cached
    Mem: 255504 248784 6720 0 51000 132796
    -/+ buffers/cache: 64988 190516
    Swap: 522104 492 521612
    [[email protected] root]#


    is that normal almost 246 mb consumed , any comments ?
    Last edited by docesam; 05-21-2005 at 04:50 AM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Miami, FL
    Posts
    2,762

    Re: fedora eating memory !!

    Originally posted by docesam
    i tried redhat 9 it consume about 80 MB of the ram leaving space "for breathing"

    i installed fedora core 1 ... wooow see :

    [[email protected] root]# free
    total used free shared buffers cached
    Mem: 255504 248784 6720 0 51000 132796
    -/+ buffers/cache: 64988 190516
    Swap: 522104 492 521612
    [[email protected] root]#


    is that normal almost 246 mb consumed , any comments ?
    Hi there!

    I'm just wondering 1 small little thing. Is this your 1st time using Linux? If it is, then I suggest that you take a look at how linux works before telling everyone that Fedora or any other linux distros "eat memory".

    If you're actually looking at that and then you're comparing or etc, then I should be in TONS of trouble by now coz about all of my servers usually go to about 98%.

    I'm sure you're wondering what's going on by now, so before I go on and say anything else, I suggest you take a look at how linux works compared to Windows.

    If that statistic was for a window server, I'd say you're in BIG trouble but if it were Linux, then all I'm gonna say is you're safe!
    Aaron Ong
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    44
    you are correct ... 1 month hands in linux

    can you explain more please ?

  4. #4
    It's normal for linux.

    You really have nothing to worry about

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    44
    Originally posted by GoManaged.com
    It's normal for linux.

    You really have nothing to worry about

    ok , then how do i know my server is "breathing well" or not ?

    do i need more RAM ?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Miami, FL
    Posts
    2,762
    Originally posted by docesam
    ok , then how do i know my server is "breathing well" or not ?

    do i need more RAM ?
    Traditional Unix tools like 'top' often report a surprisingly small amount of free memory after a system has been running for a while. For instance, after about 3 hours of uptime, the machine I'm writing this on reports under 60 MB of free memory, even though I have 512 MB of RAM on the system. Where does it all go?

    The biggest place it's being used is in the disk cache, which is currently over 290 MB. This is reported by top as "cached". Cached memory is essentially free, in that it can be replaced quickly if a running (or newly starting) program needs the memory.

    The reason Linux uses so much memory for disk cache is because the RAM is wasted if it isn't used. Keeping the cache means that if something needs the same data again, there's a good chance it will still be in the cache in memory. Fetching the information from there is around 1,000 times quicker than getting it from the hard disk. If it's not found in the cache, the hard disk needs to be read anyway, but in that case nothing has been lost in time.

    To see a better estimation of how much memory is really free for applications to use, run the command:
    Code:
    free -m
    The -m option stands for megabytes, and the output will look something like this:
    Code:
                 total       used       free     shared    buffers     cached
    Mem:           503        451         52          0         14        293
    -/+ buffers/cache:        143        360
    Swap:         1027          0       1027
    The -/+ buffers/cache line shows how much memory is used and free from the perspective of the applications. Generally speaking, if little swap is being used, memory usage isn't impacting performance at all.

    Notice that I have 512 MB of memory in my machine, but only 503 is listed as available by free. This is mainly because the kernel can't be swapped out, so the memory it occupies could never be freed. There may also be regions of memory reserved for/by the hardware for other purposes as well, depending on the system architecture.
    Aaron Ong
    Dedicated Servers - 100TB Servers - 100Mbps Unmetered Servers - Web Hosting - CDN Network
    Servers in Central, East/West Coast USA, EUROPE and ASIA
    Welltodo Century
    - www.welltodocentury.com

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    44
    [[email protected] root]# free -m
    total used free shared buffers cached
    Mem: 249 243 6 0 49 129
    -/+ buffers/cache: 63 186
    Swap: 509 0 509
    [[email protected] root]#

    so ... 63 mb used and 0 swap used means i am safe ?

  8. #8
    Yes.

    I get this all the time from customers wondering why their server is 98% RAM used. This isn't Windows, to determine actual usage you need to subtract the cached memory from the equation; as that is what you would consider "free" memory in a UNIX environment.
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  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
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    1,715
    Yes. For good performance, about half the RAM should go to cache.
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  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    44
    really thanks for your help .. NICE people

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